Science.gov

Sample records for thermal recovery unit

  1. Hydrogen recovery from the thermal plasma gasification of solid waste.

    PubMed

    Byun, Youngchul; Cho, Moohyun; Chung, Jae Woo; Namkung, Won; Lee, Hyeon Don; Jang, Sung Duk; Kim, Young-Suk; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lee, Carg-Ro; Hwang, Soon-Mo

    2011-06-15

    Thermal plasma gasification has been demonstrated as one of the most effective and environmentally friendly methods for solid waste treatment and energy utilization in many of studies. Therefore, the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification (paper mill waste, 1.2 ton/day) was applied for the recovery of high purity H(2) (>99.99%). Gases emitted from a gasification furnace equipped with a nontransferred thermal plasma torch were purified using a bag-filter and wet scrubber. Thereafter, the gases, which contained syngas (CO+H(2)), were introduced into a H(2) recovery system, consisting largely of a water gas shift (WGS) unit for the conversion of CO to H(2) and a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit for the separation and purification of H(2). It was successfully demonstrated that the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification, combined with the WGS and PSA, produced high purity H(2) (20 N m(3)/h (400 H(2)-Nm(3)/PMW-ton), up to 99.99%) using a plasma torch with 1.6 MWh/PMW-ton of electricity. The results presented here suggest that the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification for the production of high purity H(2) may provide a new approach as a future energy infrastructure based on H(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The study of the mobile compressor unit heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusha, V. L.; Chernov, G. I.; Kalashnikov, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The paper examines the mobile compressor unit (MCU) heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger prototype external thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency. The study is conducted by means of the numerical method through the modellingof the heat exchange processes carried out in the waste heat exchanger in ANSUS. Thermaflex, mineral wool, penofol, water and air were applied as the heat exchanger external insulation. The study results showed the waste heat exchanger external thermal insulationexistence or absence to have a significant impact on the heat exchanger operational efficiency.

  3. Claus sulfur recovery unit startups

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, D.C.

    1973-08-01

    Because of the recent emphasis on reducing sulfur emissions to the atmosphere, Claus-type sulfur recovery units are becoming more prevalent throughout the industry. Many plants, including refinery, chemical, and natural gasoline units, are being required to install Claus sulfur recovery facilities to meet pollution requirements. Although Claus units in some cases cannot alone meet the most rigid air pollution codes currently being enforced, they are still the most economical and practical method for recovering about 94 to 97% of the sulfur from hydrogen sulfide rich gases. For best operation and longer service life, proper startup and shutdown procedures for thesemore » sulfur recovery units should be followed. On all startups and shutdowns, these units require considerable operator attention; improper operation during these critical phases can affect overall plant efficiency.« less

  4. Mercury recovery from mercury-containing wastes using a vacuum thermal desorption system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Rim; Eom, Yujin; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2017-02-01

    Mercury (Hg)-containing waste from various industrial facilities is commonly treated by incineration or stabilization/solidification and retained in a landfill at a managed site. However, when highly concentrated Hg waste is treated using these methods, Hg is released into the atmosphere and soil environment. To eliminate these risks, Hg recovery technology using thermal treatment has been developed and commercialized to recover Hg from Hg-containing waste for safe disposal. Therefore, we developed Hg recovery equipment to treat Hg-containing waste under a vacuum of 6.67kPa (abs) at 400°C and recover the Hg. In addition, the dust generated from the waste was separated by controlling the temperature of the dust filtration unit to 230°C. Additionally, water and Hg vapors were condensed in a condensation unit. The Hg removal rate after waste treatment was 96.75%, and the Hg recovery rate as elemental Hg was 75.23%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal acidization and recovery process for recovering viscous petroleum

    DOEpatents

    Poston, Robert S.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal acidization and recovery process for increasing production of heavy viscous petroleum crude oil and synthetic fuels from subterranean hydrocarbon formations containing clay particles creating adverse permeability effects is described. The method comprises injecting a thermal vapor stream through a well bore penetrating such formations to clean the formation face of hydrocarbonaceous materials which restrict the flow of fluids into the petroleum-bearing formation. Vaporized hydrogen chloride is then injected simultaneously to react with calcium and magnesium salts in the formation surrounding the bore hole to form water soluble chloride salts. Vaporized hydrogen fluoride is then injected simultaneously with its thermal vapor to dissolve water-sensitive clay particles thus increasing permeability. Thereafter, the thermal vapors are injected until the formation is sufficiently heated to permit increased recovery rates of the petroleum.

  6. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  7. Gas engine heat recovery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasco, A. J.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of Gas Engine Heat Recovery Unit was to design, fabricate, and test an efficient, compact, and corrosion resistant heat recovery unit (HRU) for use on exhaust of natural gas-fired reciprocating engine-generator sets in the 50-500 kW range. The HRU would be a core component of a factory pre-packaged cogeneration system designed around component optimization, reliability, and efficiency. The HRU uses finned high alloy, stainless steel tubing wound into a compact helical coil heat exchanger. The corrosion resistance of the tubing allows more heat to be taken from the exhaust gas without fear of the effects of acid condensation. One HRU is currently installed in a cogeneration system at the Henry Ford Hospital Complex in Dearborn, Michigan. A second unit underwent successful endurance testing for 850 hours. The plan was to commercialize the HRU through its incorporation into a Caterpillar pre-packaged cogeneration system. Caterpillar is not proceeding with the concept at this time because of a downturn in the small size cogeneration market.

  8. Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery, (STEOR) Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P.; Shaw, H.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal enhanced oil recovery is widely used in California to aid in the production of heavy oils. Steam injection either to stimulate individual wells or to drive oil to the producing wells, is by far the major thermal process today and has been in use for over 20 years. Since steam generation at the necessary pressures (generally below 4000 kPa (580 psia)) is within the capabilities of present day solar technology, it is logical to consider the possibilities of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). The present project consisted of an evaluation of STEOR. Program objectives, system selection, trade-off studies, preliminary design, cost estimate, development plan, and market and economic analysis are summarized.

  9. Enhancing low-grade thermal energy recovery in a thermally regenerative ammonia battery using elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; LaBarge, Nicole; Yang, Wulin; Liu, Jia; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-03-01

    A thermally regenerative ammonia battery (TRAB) is a new approach for converting low-grade thermal energy into electricity by using an ammonia electrolyte and copper electrodes. TRAB operation at 72 °C produced a power density of 236 ± 8 Wm(-2), with a linear decrease in power to 95 ± 5 Wm(-2) at 23 °C. The improved power at higher temperatures was due to reduced electrode overpotentials and more favorable thermodynamics for the anode reaction (copper oxidation). The energy density varied with temperature and discharge rates, with a maximum of 650 Wh m(-3) at a discharge energy efficiency of 54% and a temperature of 37 °C. The energy efficiency calculated with chemical process simulation software indicated a Carnot-based efficiency of up to 13% and an overall thermal energy recovery of 0.5%. It should be possible to substantially improve these energy recoveries through optimization of electrolyte concentrations and by using improved ion-selective membranes and energy recovery systems such as heat exchangers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2003-04-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanismsmore » by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.« less

  11. 21 CFR 886.4115 - Thermal cautery unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4115 Thermal cautery unit. (a) Identification. A thermal cautery unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thermal cautery unit. 886.4115 Section 886.4115...

  12. 21 CFR 886.4115 - Thermal cautery unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4115 Thermal cautery unit. (a) Identification. A thermal cautery unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thermal cautery unit. 886.4115 Section 886.4115...

  13. 21 CFR 886.4115 - Thermal cautery unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4115 Thermal cautery unit. (a) Identification. A thermal cautery unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thermal cautery unit. 886.4115 Section 886.4115...

  14. 21 CFR 886.4115 - Thermal cautery unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4115 Thermal cautery unit. (a) Identification. A thermal cautery unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thermal cautery unit. 886.4115 Section 886.4115...

  15. 21 CFR 886.4115 - Thermal cautery unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4115 Thermal cautery unit. (a) Identification. A thermal cautery unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thermal cautery unit. 886.4115 Section 886.4115...

  16. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Burnley, Stephen; Phillips, Rhiannon; Coleman, Terry; Rampling, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Food availability promotes rapid recovery from thermal stress in a scleractinian coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S. R.; Lopez-Yglesias, M. A.; Anthony, K. R. N.

    2012-12-01

    Bleaching in corals due to environmental stress represents a loss of energy intake often leading to an increase in mortality risk. Successful coral recovery from severe bleaching events may depend on the rate of replenishment of algal symbiont populations following the period of thermal stress, the supply of an alternative food source, or both. Here, we explore the role of food availability in promoting the survival and recovery of a common coral ( Acropora intermedia) following acute experimentally induced thermal stress. Fed corals were provided with live rotifers daily, to maintain densities of zooplankton in tanks that are typical of coral reefs. After a 6-week acclimation phase, heated corals were subjected to a +4 °C thermal anomaly for a 7-day period (bleaching phase) then temperatures were returned to normal for a further 2 weeks (recovery phase). Results demonstrated that heated corals had higher survival when they were provided with heterotrophic food. Fed corals experienced reduced loss of chlorophyll a, relative to unfed corals. During the recovery phase, both fed and unfed corals recovered within a few days; however, fed corals recovered to pre-bleaching phase levels of chlorophyll a, whereas unfed corals stabilized approximately one-third below this level. Protein levels of fed corals declined markedly during the bleaching phase, but recovered all of their losses by the end of the recovery phase. In contrast, unfed corals had low protein levels that were maintained throughout the experiment. To the extent that these results are representative of corals' responses to thermal anomalies in nature, the findings imply that availability of particulate food matter has the potential to increase corals' capacity to survive thermally induced bleaching and to ameliorate its sub-lethal effects. They also support the hypothesis that different rates of heterotrophy are an important determinant of variation in resilience to thermal stress among reef environments.

  18. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-03-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  19. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  20. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk; Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk; Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energymore » balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.« less

  1. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  2. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  3. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  4. 40 CFR 63.1568 - What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emissions from sulfur recovery units? 63.1568 Section 63.1568 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1568 What...

  5. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  6. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. Themore » Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  7. Nutrient Recovery of Plant Leachates Under Thermal, Biological, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient recovery has always been a problem for long distance and long-term space missions. To allow humans to man these missions, a steady source of oxygen, water, and food are necessary for survival beyond Earth's atmosphere. Plants are currently an area of interest since they are capable of providing all three resources for life sustainability. We are currently interested in nutrient recovery for future plant growth and simple aqueous leachate extractions can recover some of the nutrients. However, leaching plants also removes water-soluble organic plant wastes, which inhibits plant growth if not separated properly. To combat the issues with waste and maximize nutrient recovery, we are attempting to pre-treat the plant matter using biological, thermal, and photocatalytic methods before subjecting the solution with variable-strength acid digestion. For the biological method, the inoculums: mixed heterotrophic/nitrifying bioreactor effluent and Trichoderma vessei are used in an attempt to liberate more nutrients from the plant matter. For the thermal method, plants are subjected to varying temperatures at different retention times to determine nutrient recovery. Lastly, the photocatalytic method utilizes TiO (sub 2)'s oxidizing abilities under specific pHs and retention times to reduce organic wastes and improve nutrient gains. A final acid digestion serves to liberate nutrients even further in order to maximize recovery. So far, we have tested ideal acid digestion variables for practicality and performance in our experiments. We found that a low retention time of 10 minutes and a high acid concentration of 0.1 and 1 mole HCl were the most effective at nutrient recovery. For space travel purposes, 0.1 mole currently looks like a viable acid digestion to use since it is relatively effective and sustainable from a mass and energy balance if acid recovery can be performed on waste brines. Biological pretreatments do not look to be too effective and the thermal and

  8. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Recovery Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in...

  9. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Recovery Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in...

  10. Thermal Recovery of Plastic Deformation in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Dongxiao; Yu, Xinghua; Zhang, Wei

    Stainless steel has been widely used in challenging environments typical to nuclear power plant structures, due its excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel filler metals containing high chromium concentration, including Alloy 82/182, are used for joining stainless steel to carbon steel components to achieve similar high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. However, the joint usually experience weld metal stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which affects the safety and structural integrity of light water nuclear reactor systems. A primary driving force for SCC is the high tensile residual stress in these welds. Due to large dimension of pressure vessel and limitations in the field,more » non-destructive residual stress measurement is difficult. As a result, finite element modeling has been the de facto method to evaluate the weld residual stresses. Recent studies on this subject from researchers worldwide report different residual stress value in the weldments [5]. The discrepancy is due to the fact that most of investigations ignore or underestimate the thermal recovery in the heat-affect zone or reheated region in the weld. In this paper, the effect of heat treatment on thermal recovery and microhardness is investigated for materials used in dissimilar metal joint. It is found that high equivalent plastic strains are predominately accumulated in the buttering layer, the root pass, and the heat affected zone, which experience multiple welding thermal cycles. The final cap passes, experiencing only one or two welding thermal cycles, exhibit less plastic strain accumulation. Moreover, the experimental residual plastic strains are compared with those predicted using an existing weld thermo-mechanical model with two different strain hardening rules. The importance of considering the dynamic strain hardening recovery due to high temperature exposure in welding is discussed for the accurate simulation of weld residual stresses and plastic strains. In conclsuion, the

  11. Stress recovery and cyclic behaviour of an Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy after multiple thermal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, E.; Ghafoori, E.; Leinenbach, C.; Motavalli, M.; Holdsworth, S. R.

    2018-02-01

    The stress recovery and cyclic deformation behaviour of Fe-17Mn-5Si-10Cr-4Ni-1(V,C) shape memory alloy (Fe-SMA) strips, which are often used for pre-stressed strengthening of structural members, were studied. The evolution of recovery stress under different constraint conditions was studied. The results showed that the magnitude of the tensile stress in the Fe-SMA member during thermal activation can have a signification effect on the final recovery stress. The higher the tensile load in the Fe-SMA (e.g., caused by dead load or thermal expansion of parent structure during heating phase), the lower the final recovery stress. Furthermore, this study investigated the cyclic behaviour of the activated SMA followed by a second thermal activation. Although the magnitude of the recovery stress decreased during the cyclic loading, the second thermal activation could retrieve a significant part of the relaxed recovery stress. This observation suggests that the relaxation of recovery stress during cyclic loading is due to a reversible phase transformation-induced deformation (i.e., forward austenite-to-martensite transformation) rather than an irreversible dislocation-induced plasticity. Retrieval of the relaxed recovery stress by the reactivation process has important practical implications as the prestressing loss in pre-stressed civil structures can be simply recovered by reheating of the Fe-SMA elements.

  12. Thermally-enhanced oil recovery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, Charles R.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.

    1987-01-01

    A thermally-enhanced oil recovery method and apparatus for exploiting deep well reservoirs utilizes electric downhole steam generators to provide supplemental heat to generate high quality steam from hot pressurized water which is heated at the surface. A downhole electric heater placed within a well bore for local heating of the pressurized liquid water into steam is powered by electricity from the above-ground gas turbine-driven electric generators fueled by any clean fuel such as natural gas, distillate or some crude oils, or may come from the field being stimulated. Heat recovered from the turbine exhaust is used to provide the hot pressurized water. Electrical power may be cogenerated and sold to an electric utility to provide immediate cash flow and improved economics. During the cogeneration period (no electrical power to some or all of the downhole units), the oil field can continue to be stimulated by injecting hot pressurized water, which will flash into lower quality steam at reservoir conditions. The heater includes electrical heating elements supplied with three-phase alternating current or direct current. The injection fluid flows through the heater elements to generate high quality steam to exit at the bottom of the heater assembly into the reservoir. The injection tube is closed at the bottom and has radial orifices for expanding the injection fluid to reservoir pressure.

  13. Acid rain recovery may help to mitigate the impacts of climate change on thermally sensitive fish in lakes across eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Warren, Dana R; Kraft, Clifford E; Josephson, Daniel C; Driscoll, Charles T

    2017-06-01

    From the 1970s to 1990s, more stringent air quality regulations were implemented across North America and Europe to reduce chemical emissions that contribute to acid rain. Surface water pH slowly increased during the following decades, but biological recovery lagged behind chemical recovery. Fortunately, this situation is changing. In the past few years, northeastern US fish populations have begun to recover in lakes that were historically incapable of sustaining wild fish due to acidic conditions. As lake ecosystems across the eastern United States recover from acid deposition, the stress to the most susceptible populations of native coldwater fish appears to be shifting from acidification effects to thermal impacts associated with changing climate. Extreme summer temperature events - which are expected to occur with increasing frequency in the coming century - can stress and ultimately kill native coldwater fish in lakes where thermal stratification is absent or highly limited. Based on data from northeastern North America, we argue that recovery from acid deposition has the potential to improve the resilience of coldwater fish populations in some lakes to impacts of climate change. This will occur as the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the water increases with increasing lake pH. Increased DOC will reduce water clarity and lead to shallower and more persistent lake thermoclines that can provide larger areas of coldwater thermal refuge habitat. Recovery from acidification will not eliminate the threat of climate change to coldwater fish, but secondary effects of acid recovery may improve the resistance of coldwater fish populations in lakes to the effects of elevated summer temperatures in historically acidified ecosystems. This analysis highlights the importance of considering the legacy of past ecosystem impacts and how recovery or persistence of those effects may interact with climate change impacts on biota in the coming decades. © 2016 John

  14. Plant Leachate Nutrient Recovery with Biological, Thermal, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for long term space travel: provide essential resources - oxygen, water, food; Water-soaked plants expel soluble nutrients in a leachate solution - toxins and wastes are also expelled and inhibit growth; biological, thermal, photocatalytic coupled with an acid digestion treatment will hopefully maximize recovery and remove wastes

  15. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(a)(1...

  16. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568...

  17. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(a)(1...

  18. Changes in Nannoplankton Assemblages during the recovery of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, J. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Self-Trail, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery interval of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to examine how organisms adapt to environmental change after a rapid global warming event. Calcareous nannoplankton survived the PETM, but we lack an understanding of how long it took for assemblages to adapt to a changing climate and the millennial-scale changes in their ecology. Here, we present the first high-resolution record of nannoplankton community change during the PETM recovery using a global data set (United States Geological Survey (USGS) Wilson Lake core, USGS Cam-Dor core, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 690, 1265, and 1209) to assess millennial-scale assemblage change across space and time. Preliminary multivariate analyses on assemblage changes at Wilson Lake demonstrate that within 20,000 years after the onset, the structure of nannoplankton communities shifts from an assemblage dominated by warm eutrophic specialists to one dominated by eutrophic low salinity specialists. In the late recovery, ubiquitous taxa dominate assemblages, suggesting that the shelf environment became favorable for generalists. The latest part of the recovery is marked by a slight increase in oligotrophic specialists, indicating that the shelf became less eutrophic into the early Eocene. Overall, these analyses suggest that assemblages changed rapidly in response to cooling and changing ocean circulation during the early recovery of the PETM. Future analyses will build on these data by comparing assemblage change from other PETM coastal and open ocean sites. These analyses will help us better understand the spatial and temporal changes of nannoplankton communities on a global scale, lessons that can inform how nannoplankton will respond to future climate change.

  19. A review of technologies and performances of thermal treatment systems for energy recovery from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unicusano.it; Carnevale, Ennio; Corti, Andrea

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The topic of energy recovery from waste by thermal treatment is reviewed. • Combustion, gasification and pyrolysis were considered. • Data about energy recovery performances were collected and compared. • Main limitations to high values of energy performances were illustrated. • Diffusion of energy recovery from waste in EU, USA and other countries was discussed. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to identify the current level of energy recovery through waste thermal treatment. The state of the art in energy recovery from waste was investigated, highlighting the differences for different types of thermal treatment, considering combustion/incineration,more » gasification and pyrolysis. Also different types of wastes – Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) or Solid Refuse Fuels (SRF) and some typologies of Industrial Waste (IW) (sludge, plastic scraps, etc.) – were included in the analysis. The investigation was carried out mainly reviewing papers, published in scientific journals and conferences, but also considering technical reports, to gather more information. In particular the goal of this review work was to synthesize studies in order to compare the values of energy conversion efficiencies measured or calculated for different types of thermal processes and different types of waste. It emerged that the dominant type of thermal treatment is incineration associated to energy recovery in a steam cycle. When waste gasification is applied, the produced syngas is generally combusted in a boiler to generate steam for energy recovery in a steam cycle. For both the possibilities – incineration or gasification – cogeneration is the mean to improve energy recovery, especially for small scale plants. In the case of only electricity production, the achievable values are strongly dependent on the plant size: for large plant size, where advanced technical solutions can be applied and sustained from an economic point of

  20. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery...

  1. An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage unit for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Rose, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage Unit (ITSU), that would store and utilize heat energy in a 'pulsed' fashion in space operations, is described. Properties of various radioisotopes are considered in conjunction with characteristics of thermal energy storage materials, to evaluate possible implementation of such a device. The utility of the unit is discussed in light of various space applications, including rocket propulsion, power generation, and spacecraft thermal management.

  2. Recovery-based services in a psychiatric intensive care unit - the consumer perspective.

    PubMed

    Ash, David; Suetani, Shuichi; Nair, Jayakrishnan; Halpin, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    To describe the implementation of recovery-based practice into a psychiatric intensive care unit, and report change in seclusion rates over the period when these changes were introduced (2011-2013). Recovery-based practices including collaborative care, safety care plans, a comfort room, and debriefing after coercive interventions were introduced. A carer consultant was employed. A restraint and seclusion review committee, chaired by a peer worker, was established. A consumer exit interview was introduced and these data were collected, reviewed by staff and the peer worker and used to improve the ward environment. Rates of seclusion were measured during the period when recovery-based practices were introduced. Consumer feedback indicated that positive aspects of the psychiatric intensive care unit included approachable, helpful staff and completion of a safety care plan. Negative aspects included lack of involvement in decisions about admission and about medications, the non-smoking policy, and being placed in seclusion or restraint. There was a significant reduction in the number of consumers secluded and the total number of seclusions. Recovery principles can be successfully introduced in a psychiatric intensive care unit environment. Introduction of recovery based practice was associated with a reduction in seclusion. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  3. Environmental Control Unit with Integral Thermal Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    integrated PCM Heat Exchanger (PHX) to provide thermal energy storage . By storing thermal energy during the hottest part of the day and rejecting this stored...Environmental Control Unit (ECU) that uses an integrated PCM Heat Exchanger (PHX) to provide thermal energy storage . To aid in the development of the PHX...Thermal Storage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911QX-14-C-0014 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael C. Ellis Ryan McDevitt 5d

  4. Development of a thermal scheme for a cogeneration combined-cycle unit with an SVBR-100 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Dudolin, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    At present, the prospects for development of district heating that can increase the effectiveness of nuclear power stations (NPS), cut down their payback period, and improve protection of the environment against harmful emissions are being examined in the nuclear power industry of Russia. It is noted that the efficiency of nuclear cogeneration power stations (NCPS) is drastically affected by the expenses for heat networks and heat losses during transportation of a heat carrier through them, since NPSs are usually located far away from urban area boundaries as required for radiation safety of the population. The prospects for using cogeneration power units with small or medium power reactors at NPSs, including combined-cycle units and their performance indices, are described. The developed thermal scheme of a cogeneration combined-cycle unit (CCU) with an SBVR-100 nuclear reactor (NCCU) is presented. This NCCU should use a GE 6FA gasturbine unit (GTU) and a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a two-stage district heating plant. Saturated steam from the nuclear reactor is superheated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) to 560-580°C so that a separator-superheater can be excluded from the thermal cycle of the turbine unit. In addition, supplemental fuel firing in HRSG is examined. NCCU effectiveness indices are given as a function of the ambient air temperature. Results of calculations of the thermal cycle performance under condensing operating conditions indicate that the gross electric efficiency η el NCCU gr of = 48% and N el NCCU gr = 345 MW can be achieved. This efficiency is at maximum for NCCU with an SVBR-100 reactor. The conclusion is made that the cost of NCCU installed kW should be estimated, and the issue associated with NCCUs siting with reference to urban area boundaries must be solved.

  5. Effects of Recovery Behavior and Strain-Rate Dependence of Stress-Strain Curve on Prediction Accuracy of Thermal Stress Analysis During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, Yuichi; Shiga, Hidetoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Kambe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Recovery behavior (recovery) and strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve (strain-rate dependence) are incorporated into constitutive equations of alloys to predict residual stress and thermal stress during casting. Nevertheless, few studies have systematically investigated the effects of these metallurgical phenomena on the prediction accuracy of thermal stress in a casting. This study compares the thermal stress analysis results with in situ thermal stress measurement results of an Al-Si-Cu specimen during casting. The results underscore the importance for the alloy constitutive equation of incorporating strain-rate dependence to predict thermal stress that develops at high temperatures where the alloy shows strong strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve. However, the prediction accuracy of the thermal stress developed at low temperatures did not improve by considering the strain-rate dependence. Incorporating recovery into the constitutive equation improved the accuracy of the simulated thermal stress at low temperatures. Results of comparison implied that the constitutive equation should include strain-rate dependence to simulate defects that develop from thermal stress at high temperatures, such as hot tearing and hot cracking. Recovery should be incorporated into the alloy constitutive equation to predict the casting residual stress and deformation caused by the thermal stress developed mainly in the low temperature range.

  6. Transformation to a recovery-oriented model of care on a veterans administration inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Zuehlke, Jessica B; Kotecki, Robert M; Kern, Shira; Sholty, Gretchen; Hauser, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Recovery-oriented care is among the highest treatment priorities for the Veteran Health Administration, which has endorsed organizational change of mental health care to reflect recovery values. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine whether recovery interventions would yield positive outcomes when delivered on in inpatient psychiatry. Recovery interventions on the unit included recovery-focused interdisciplinary team meetings, opportunities for stakeholder feedback, recovery staff education, increased group programming, peer support, and changes to treatment planning to include increased Veteran engagement and responsibility. Participants included 352 patients and 27 staff. Outcomes were number of restraints/seclusions used, 30-day readmission rates, and staff satisfaction. Our results showed an overall decrease in restraint/seclusion use by over 50% and an increase in staff satisfaction. Our results suggest that implementing a recovery-oriented model of care in an acute psychiatric inpatient unit may have significant benefits for both staff and patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. High-speed clock recovery unit based on a phase aligner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejera, Efrain; Esper-Chain, Roberto; Tobajas, Felix; De Armas, Valentin; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2003-04-01

    Nowadays clock recovery units are key elements in high speed digital communication systems. For an efficient operation, this units should generate a low jitter clock based on the NRZ received data, and be tolerant to long absence of transitions. Architectures based on Hogge phase detectors have been widely used, nevertheless, they are very sensitive to jitter of the received data and they have a limited tolerance to the absence of transitions. This paper shows a novel high speed clock recovery unit based on a phase aligner. The system allows a very fast clock recovery with a low jitter, moreover, it is very resistant to absence of transitions. The design is based on eight phases obtained from a reference clock running at the nominal frequency of the received signal. This high speed reference clock is generated using a crystal and a clock multiplier unit. The phase alignment system chooses, as starting point, the two phases closest to the data phase. This allows a maximum error of 45 degrees between the clock and data signal phases. Furthermore, the system includes a feed-back loop that interpolates the chosen phases to reduce the phase error to zero. Due to the high stability and reduced tolerance of the local reference clock, the jitter obtained is highly reduced and the system becomes able to operate under long absence of transitions. This performances make this design suitable for systems such as high speed serial link technologies. This system has been designed for CMOS 0.25μm at 1.25GHz and has been verified through HSpice simulations.

  8. 40 CFR 63.1568 - What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units? 63.1568 Section 63.1568 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units? (a) What emission limitations and work practice...

  9. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating units...

  10. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating units...

  11. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials—shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator—in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials. PMID:28106156

  12. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials—shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator—in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials.

  13. Skylab extravehicular mobility unit thermal simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.; Phillips, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical methods, thermal model, and user's instructions for the Skylab Extravehicular Mobility Unit (SEMU) routine are presented. This digital computer program was developed for detailed thermal performance predictions of the SEMU on the NASA-JSC Univac 1108 computer system. It accounts for conductive, convective, and radiant heat transfer as well as fluid flow and special component characterization. The program provides thermal performance predictions for a 967 node thermal model in one thirty-sixth (1/36) of mission time when operated at a calculating interval of three minutes (mission time). The program has the operational flexibility to: (1) accept card or magnetic tape data input for the thermal model describing the SEMU structure, fluid systems, crewman and component performance, (2) accept card and/or magnetic tape input of internally generated heat and heat influx from the space environment, and (3) output tabular or plotted histories of temperature, flow rates, and other parameters describing system operating modes.

  14. A review of technologies and performances of thermal treatment systems for energy recovery from waste.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lidia; Carnevale, Ennio; Corti, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the current level of energy recovery through waste thermal treatment. The state of the art in energy recovery from waste was investigated, highlighting the differences for different types of thermal treatment, considering combustion/incineration, gasification and pyrolysis. Also different types of wastes - Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) or Solid Refuse Fuels (SRF) and some typologies of Industrial Waste (IW) (sludge, plastic scraps, etc.) - were included in the analysis. The investigation was carried out mainly reviewing papers, published in scientific journals and conferences, but also considering technical reports, to gather more information. In particular the goal of this review work was to synthesize studies in order to compare the values of energy conversion efficiencies measured or calculated for different types of thermal processes and different types of waste. It emerged that the dominant type of thermal treatment is incineration associated to energy recovery in a steam cycle. When waste gasification is applied, the produced syngas is generally combusted in a boiler to generate steam for energy recovery in a steam cycle. For both the possibilities--incineration or gasification--co-generation is the mean to improve energy recovery, especially for small scale plants. In the case of only electricity production, the achievable values are strongly dependent on the plant size: for large plant size, where advanced technical solutions can be applied and sustained from an economic point of view, net electric efficiency may reach values up to 30-31%. In small-medium plants, net electric efficiency is constrained by scale effect and remains at values around 20-24%. Other types of technical solutions--gasification with syngas use in internally fired devices, pyrolysis and plasma gasification--are less common or studied at pilot or demonstrative scale and, in any case, offer at present similar or lower levels

  15. A novel simultaneous demultiplexing and clock recovery unit for high speed OTDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kangping; Jia, Nan; Li, Tangjun; Wang, Muguang; Chi, Jianfeng; Sun, Jian; Wang, Jingtian

    2010-11-01

    In this letter, a novel simultaneous demultiplexing and clock recovery unit based on EAMs and clock recovery module is presented and experimentally demonstrated for a high speed OTDM system. The 10GHz clock signal with low jitter is extracted from 80Gbit/s and 160Gbit/s OTDM signal, and every channel of the OTDM signal is successfully demultiplexed using this unit. The power penalty is lower than 3dB at BER of 10-9.

  16. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Wayland, Jr., James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the CSAMT technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (a) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (b) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the connate water of the production field; (c) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (d) mathematically comparing the maps from step (a) and step (c) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  17. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1984-03-30

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  18. Lower food chain community study: thermal effects and post-thermal recovery in the streams and swamps of the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratieff, P.; Kondratieff, B.C.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of thermal stress on lower food chain communities of streams and swamps of the Savannah River Plant. Both the autotroph assemblages and the macro invertebrate communities were studied in streams receiving heated reactor effluent. To document stream and swamp ecosystem recovery from thermal stress, the same communities of organisms were studied in a stream/swamp ecosystem which had received heated reactor effluent in the past. (ACR)

  19. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebilcox, G. J.; Lundberg, W. L.

    1981-03-01

    The canning segment of the food processing industry is a major energy user within that industry. Most of its energy demand is met by hot water and steam and those fluids, in addition to product cooling water, eventually flow from the processes as warm waste water. To minimize the possibility of product contamination, a large percentage of that waste water is sent directly to factory drains and sewer systems without being recycled and in many cases the thermal energy contained by the waste streams also goes unreclaimed and is lost from further use. Waste heat recovery in canning facilities can be performed economically using systems that employ thermal energy storage (TES). A project was proposed in which a demonstration waste heat recovery system, including a TES feature, would be designed, installed and operated.

  20. Heavy metals dispersion during thermal treatment of plastic bags and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Alam, Ohidul; Wang, Sijia; Lu, Wentao

    2018-04-15

    One of the main worries for thermal treatment of plastic bag (PB) is the air pollution resulting from heavy metal (HM) evaporation and emission. The quest of the study was to investigate their fate during thermal treatment varying with temperature and atmosphere to explore the appropriate treatment technology. Four commonly consumed polymer bags such as PE, HDPE, LDPE and PVC were selected for the analysis. The elemental compositions, heating values and total metal contents of the samples were measured by an elemental analyzer, a sulphur/halogen analyzer, a bomb calorimeter and an ICP-OES, respectively. Thermal treatments of the samples were conducted in a tube furnace at 350, 550, 650, 750, and 850 °C with 1 L/min air or N 2 gas flow, respectively. 5% HNO 3 /10% H 2 O 2 solution was used for absorbing metals from gas phase, and then HM distributions both in flue gas and bottom ash were determined. Results revealed that the lower heating values of HDPE, LDPE, PVC and PE bags were 33.32, 34.28, 24.82 and 36.7 MJ/kg, respectively indicating energy recovery potential. Thermal treatment showed the maximum mass reduction (>90%) of PB at 850 °C. The higher percentage of metals was distributed in ash at initial temperature that promoted to gas with rise of temperature. The used absorption solution exhibited tremendous quantity of metals recovery. However, there was no significant difference between using air and N 2 gas flow during treatment of PB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  2. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  3. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  4. Advancing the recovery orientation of hospital care through staff engagement with former clients of inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame; Collins, April; Clark, Carrie; Costa, Lucy; Mihalakakos, George; Paterson, Jane

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of consumer narratives on the recovery orientation and job satisfaction of service providers on inpatient wards that focus on the treatment of schizophrenia. It was developed to address the paucity of literature and service development tools that address advancing the recovery model of care in inpatient contexts. A mixed-methods design was used. Six inpatient units in a large urban psychiatric facility were paired on the basis of characteristic length of stay, and one unit from each pair was assigned to the intervention. The intervention was a series of talks (N=58) to inpatient staff by 12 former patients; the talks were provided approximately biweekly between May 2011 and May 2012. Self-report measures completed by staff before and after the intervention assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the recovery model, the delivery of recovery-oriented care at a unit level, and job satisfaction. In addition, focus groups for unit staff and individual interviews with the speakers were conducted after the speaker series had ended. The hypothesis that the speaker series would have an impact on the attitudes and knowledge of staff with respect to the recovery model was supported. This finding was evident from both quantitative and qualitative data. No impact was observed for recovery orientation of care at the unit level or for job satisfaction. Although this engagement strategy demonstrated an impact, more substantial change in inpatient practices likely requires a broader set of strategies that address skill levels and accountability.

  5. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity of the injected hot water for a single injection-recovery well scheme. The proposed method was tested through numerical modeling with SEAWATv4, considering seasonal HT-ATES with four consecutive injection-storage-recovery cycles. Recovery efficiencies for the consecutive cycles were investigated for six cases with three simulated scenarios: (a) regular HT-ATES, (b) HT-ATES with density difference compensation using saline water, and (c) theoretical regular HT-ATES without free thermal convection. For the reference case, in which 80 °C water was injected into a high-permeability aquifer, regular HT-ATES had an efficiency of 0.40 after four consecutive recovery cycles. The density difference compensation method resulted in an efficiency of 0.69, approximating the theoretical case (0.76). Sensitivity analysis showed that the net efficiency increase by using the density difference compensation method instead of regular HT-ATES is greater for higher aquifer hydraulic conductivity, larger temperature difference between injection water and ambient groundwater, smaller injection volume, and larger aquifer thickness. This means that density difference compensation allows the application of HT-ATES in thicker, more permeable aquifers and with larger temperatures than would be considered for regular HT-ATES systems.

  6. Design study on the efficiency of the thermal scheme of power unit of thermal power plants in hot climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlov, A.; Dorokhov, Y.; Rybakov, B.; Nenashev, A.

    2017-11-01

    At the stage of pre-proposals unit of the thermal power plants for regions with a hot climate requires a design study on the efficiency of possible options for the structure of the thermal circuit and a set of key parameters. In this paper, the thermal circuit of the condensing unit powerfully 350 MW. The main feature of the external conditions of thermal power plants in hot climates is the elevated temperature of cooling water of the turbine condensers. For example, in the Persian Gulf region as the cooling water is sea water. In the hot season of the year weighted average sea water temperature of 30.9 °C and during the cold season to 22.8 °C. From the turbine part of the steam is supplied to the distillation-desalination plant. In the hot season of the year heat scheme with pressure fresh pair of 23.54 MPa, temperature 570/560 °C and feed pump with electric drive (EDP) is characterized by a efficiency net of 0.25% higher than thermal schem with feed turbine pump (TDP). However, the supplied power unit with PED is less by 11.6 MW. Calculations of thermal schemes in all seasons of the year allowed us to determine the difference in the profit margin of units of the TDP and EDP. During the year the unit with the TDP provides the ability to obtain the profit margin by 1.55 million dollars more than the unit EDP. When using on the market subsidized price of electricity (Iran) marginal profit of a unit with TDP more at 7.25 million dollars.

  7. Geothermal waste heat utilization from in situ thermal bitumen recovery operations.

    PubMed

    Nakevska, Nevenka; Schincariol, Robert A; Dehkordi, S Emad; Cheadle, Burns A

    2015-01-01

    In situ thermal methods for bitumen extraction introduce a tremendous amount of energy into the reservoirs raising ambient temperatures of 13 °C to as high as 200 °C at the steam chamber edge and 50 °C along the reservoir edge. In essence these operations have unintentionally acted as underground thermal energy storage systems which can be recovered after completion of bitumen extraction activities. Groundwater flow and heat transport models of the Cold Lake, Alberta, reservoir, coupled with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) model, allowed for investigating the use of closed-loop geothermal systems for energy recovery. Three types of BHEs (single U-tube, double U-tube, coaxial) were tested and analyzed by comparing outlet temperatures and corresponding heat extraction rates. Initial one year continuous operation simulations show that the double U-tube configuration had the best performance producing an average temperature difference of 5.7 °C, and an average heat extraction of 41 W/m. Given the top of the reservoir is at a depth of 400 m, polyethylene piping provided for larger extraction gains over more thermally conductive steel piping. Thirty year operation simulations illustrate that allowing 6 month cyclic recovery periods only increases the loop temperature gain by a factor of 1.2 over continuous operation. Due to the wide spacing of existing boreholes and reservoir depth, only a small fraction of the energy is efficiently recovered. Drilling additional boreholes between existing wells would increase energy extraction. In areas with shallower bitumen deposits such as the Athabasca region, i.e. 65 to 115 m deep, BHE efficiencies should be larger. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradation to high doses

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman

    2013-08-03

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)–12%Cr–1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiationinduced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature 430 °C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3–148 dpa at 378–504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has beenmore » established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 3 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.« less

  9. Recovery-Oriented Mental Health Practice in a Community Care Unit: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Oakes, Jane; Fourniotis, Niki; Toomey, Nigel; Furness, Trentham

    A recovery-oriented model of care has become the major focus of mental health service delivery in the state of Victoria, Australia. However, there is a total absence of knowledge of recovery-oriented mental health practice in community care units (CCUs). Therefore, the aims of this exploratory study were to: (a) describe what aspects of the current model of care fit within the domains of recovery; and (b) describe the pragmatic processes that staff use to mold their care within the domains of recovery. Twenty-one key stakeholders provided informed voluntary consent to participate in one-to-one interviews. Six content domains evolved to include: (a) a common vision: "a continuous journey"; (b) promoting hope; (c) promoting autonomy and self-determination; (d) meaningful engagement; (e) holistic and personalized care; and (f) community participation and citizenship. The CCU appeared to be on a journey of transformation toward personal recovery. However, clinicians were grappling with an identified tension among personal recovery and clinical recovery. The tension among personal recovery and clinical recovery may be attributed to the psychosocial rehabilitation model of care, which was previously systemic in Victorian CCUs.

  10. Thermal analysis of Malaysian double storey housing - low/medium cost unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normah, M. G.; Lau, K. Y.; Yusoff, S. Mohd.

    2012-06-01

    Almost half of the total energy used today is consumed in buildings. In the tropical climate, air-conditioning a housing unit takes much of the energy bill. Malaysia is no exception. Malaysian double storey terrace housing is popular among developers and buyers. Surveys have shown that housing occupants are much dissatisfied with the thermal comfort and artificial cooling is often sought. The objective of this study is to assess the thermal comfort of the low and medium-cost double storey housing in the area surrounding Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. A simulation program using the Weighting Factor Method calculates the heat transfer interaction, temperature distribution, and PMV level in three types of housing units in relation to the size. Fanger's PMV model based on ISO Standard 7730 is used here because it accounts for all parameters that affect the thermal sensation of a human within its equation. Results showed that both the low and medium-cost housing units studied are out of the comfortable range described by ASHRAE Standard 55 with the units all complied with the local bylaws. In view of the uncertainties in energy supply, future housing units should consider natural ventilation as part of the passive energy management.

  11. Reality of working in a community-based, recovery-oriented mental health rehabilitation unit: A pragmatic grounded theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen; Dark, Frances; Newman, Ellie; Korman, Nicole; Rasmussen, Zoe; Meurk, Carla

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we explored the experiences of staff working at a recovery-oriented, community-based residential mental health rehabilitation unit in Brisbane, Australia, called a 'community care unit' (CCU). A pragmatic approach to grounded theory was taken in the analysis of the transcripts of semistructured interviews with eight staff. Convenience sampling was used, and there was representation of junior and senior staff across nursing, allied health, and non-clinical support roles. Four key themes emerged from the analysis: (i) rehabilitation is different to treatment; (ii) the CCU is a positive transitional space; (iii) they (consumers) have to be ready to engage; and (iv) recovery is central to rehabilitation practice. Staff understandings of recovery in rehabilitation work were complex and included consideration of both personal and clinical recovery concepts. Rehabilitation readiness was considered important to the ability to deliver recovery-oriented care; however, the shared role of staff in maintaining engagement was acknowledged. Threats to recovery-oriented rehabilitation practice included staff burnout and external pressure to accept consumers who are not ready. The reality of working at a community-based recovery-oriented rehabilitation unit is complex. Active vigilance is needed to maintain a focus on recovery and rehabilitation. Leadership needs to focus on reducing burnout and in adapting these services to emergent needs. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Results of Steam-Water-Oxygen Treatment of the Inside of Heating Surfaces in Heat-Recovery Steam Generators of the PGU-800 Power Unit at the Perm' District Thermal Power Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovechkina, O. V.; Zhuravlev, L. S.; Drozdov, A. A.; Solomeina, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    Prestarting, postinstallation steam-water-oxygen treatment (SWOT) of the natural circulation/steam reheat heat-recovery steam generators (HRSG) manufactured by OAO Krasny Kotelshchik was performed at the PGU-800 power unit of the Perm District Thermal Power Station (GRES). Prior to SWOT, steam-oxygen cleaning, passivation, and preservation of gas condensate heaters (GCH) of HRSGs were performed for 10 h using 1.3MPa/260°C/70 t/h external steam. After that, test specimens were cut out that demonstrated high strength of the passivating film. SWOT of the inside of the heating surfaces was carried out during no-load operation of the gas turbine unit with an exhaust temperature of 280-300°C at the HRSG inlet. The steam turbine was shutdown, and the generated steam was discharged into the atmosphere. Oxygen was metered into the discharge pipeline of the electricity-driven feed pumps and downcomers of the evaporators. The behavior of the concentration by weight of iron compounds and the results of investigation of cutout specimens by the drop or potentiometric method indicate that the steam-water-oxygen process makes it possible to remove corrosion products and reduce the time required to put a boiler into operation. Unlike other processes, SWOT does not require metal-intensive cleaning systems, temporary metering stations, and structures for collection of the waste solution.

  13. Trends in lumber processing in the Western United States. Part II: Overrun and lumber recovery factors.

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Keith A. Blatner; Jean M. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    This article describes trends in three measures of lumber recovery for sawmills in the western United States: lumber overrun (LO), lumber recovery factor (LRF), and cubic lumber recovery (CLR). All states and regions showed increased LO during the last three decades. Oregon and Montana had the highest LO at 107 and 100 percent, respectively. Alaska had the lowest LO at...

  14. Analysis of recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage: a Rayleigh-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schout, Gilian; Drijver, Benno; Gutierrez-Neri, Mariene; Schotting, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) is an important technique for energy conservation. A controlling factor for the economic feasibility of HT-ATES is the recovery efficiency. Due to the effects of density-driven flow (free convection), HT-ATES systems applied in permeable aquifers typically have lower recovery efficiencies than conventional (low-temperature) ATES systems. For a reliable estimation of the recovery efficiency it is, therefore, important to take the effect of density-driven flow into account. A numerical evaluation of the prime factors influencing the recovery efficiency of HT-ATES systems is presented. Sensitivity runs evaluating the effects of aquifer properties, as well as operational variables, were performed to deduce the most important factors that control the recovery efficiency. A correlation was found between the dimensionless Rayleigh number (a measure of the relative strength of free convection) and the calculated recovery efficiencies. Based on a modified Rayleigh number, two simple analytical solutions are proposed to calculate the recovery efficiency, each one covering a different range of aquifer thicknesses. The analytical solutions accurately reproduce all numerically modeled scenarios with an average error of less than 3 %. The proposed method can be of practical use when considering or designing an HT-ATES system.

  15. Development of thermal energy storage units for spacecraft cryogenic coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.; Mahefkey, E. T.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Units were developed for storing thermal energy required for operating Vuilleumier cryogenic space coolers. In the course of the development work the thermal characteristics of thermal energy storage material was investigated. By three distinctly different methods it was established that ternary salts did not release fusion energy as determined by ideality at the melting point of the eutectic salt. Phase change energy was released over a relatively wide range of temperature with a large change in volume. This strongly affects the amount of thermal energy that is available to the Vuilleumier cryogenic cooler at its operating temperature range and the amount of thermal energy that can be stored and released during a single storage cycle.

  16. Recovery of functionally-active protein from inclusion bodies using a thermal-cycling method.

    PubMed

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Filipe, Carlos D M; Ghosh, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Heterologous overexpression of genes in Escherichia coli has made it possible to obtain high titers of recombinant proteins. However, this can result in the formation of aggregated protein particles known as 'inclusion bodies'. Protein sequestered as inclusion body is inactive and needs to be converted back to its functional form by refolding using appropriate techniques. In the current study inclusion bodies of the enzyme aminoglycoside nucleotidyl transferase (or ANT(2″)-Ia) were first solubilized in urea and subsequently subjected to thermal cycling under controlled conditions as part of the refolding strategy. Thermal cycling led to disaggregation of the individual protein chains and simultaneously refolding the released protein molecules to their native state. The optimum condition was identified as 10-80°C thermal cycling at 3°C s -1 for 2 h. Enzyme activity measurements showed that thermal cycling under optimized conditions resulted in 257% activity recovery when compared with nonrefolded protein. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:133-139, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Analysis of Thermal Design of Heating Units with Meteorological Climate Peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seminenko, A. S.; Elistratova, Y. V.; Pererva, M. I.; Moiseev, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of thermal design of heating units, one of the compulsory calculations of heating systems, which ensures their stable and efficient operation. The article analyses the option of a single-pipe heating system with shifted end-capping areas and the overhead supply main; the difference is shown in the calculation results between heat balance equation of the heating unit and calculation of the actual heat flux (heat transfer coefficient) taking into account deviation from the standardized (technical passport) operating conditions. The calculation of the thermal conditions of residential premises is given, the deviation of the internal air temperature is shown taking into account the discrepancy between the calculation results for thermal energy.

  18. Smart house-based optimal operation of thermal unit commitment for a smart grid considering transmission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, Harun Or Rashid; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Noorzad, Ahmad Samim; Muarapaz, Cirio Celestino; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a smart house-based power system for thermal unit commitment programme. The proposed power system consists of smart houses, renewable energy plants and conventional thermal units. The transmission constraints are considered for the proposed system. The generated power of the large capacity renewable energy plant leads to the violated transmission constraints in the thermal unit commitment programme, therefore, the transmission constraint should be considered. This paper focuses on the optimal operation of the thermal units incorporated with controllable loads such as Electrical Vehicle and Heat Pump water heater of the smart houses. The proposed method is compared with the power flow in thermal units operation without controllable loads and the optimal operation without the transmission constraints. Simulation results show the validation of the proposed method.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: COMM ENGINEERING, USA ENVIRONMENTAL VAPOR RECOVERY UNIT (EVRU)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the testing of a new technology that recovers and utilizes vapors from crude oil storage tanks employed in the oil production and processing industry. The COMM Engineering, USA Environmental Vapor Recovery Unit (EVRU) is a non-mechanical eductor, or jet pump...

  20. Simultaneous magnetic investigations of Cu precipitation and recovery in thermally aged Fe-Cu alloy by first-order-reversal-curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Kawagoe, Riko; Murakami, Hiroaki

    2018-05-01

    We have measured first-order reversal curves (FORCs) for Fe-1wt%Cu alloy thermally aged at 753 K up to 20000 min. While hardness exhibits a maximum at around 1000 min, reflecting the formation and growth of Cu precipitates, major-loop coercivity monotonically decreases and becomes almost constant above 100 min.; an increase of coercivity associated with Cu precipitation is masked by a large decrease due to recovery. On the other hand, FORC diagrams exhibit two distribution peaks at low and high switching fields after aging. While the former shifts towards a lower switching field after aging, reflecting recovery, the latter shows up after aging up to ˜1000 min, possibly due to the formation of Cu precipitates. These observations demonstrate that FORCs are useful to separately evaluate competing microstructural changes in thermally aged Fe-Cu alloy where recovery and Cu precipitation take place simultaneously.

  1. Thermal oxidation saves $500,000, lifts capacity, upholds compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, C.G.; Nagy, A.J.; Sendecki, M.

    1985-12-01

    The age and destruction of the heat recovery system dictated the replacement of the original fume incinerator at the Congoleum Resilient Flooring Division Plant in Trenton, NJ. The original unit, installed in 1967, had a conventional air-to-oil heat recovery system. Plant personnel placed high priority on finding a replacement with a higher thermal efficiency while still maintaining environmental integrity. A proprietary software program was used to obtain values for NPV (net pressure value) for several competitive equipment systems. The NPV allows simple comparison of equipment based on data such as purchase pgsrice, cost of installation, operating costs, and maintenance costsmore » for the predicted life span of each unit. Based on NPV analysis, a regenerative thermal oxidation unit was selected. To assure expansion capability, Congoleum opted for a 30,000 scfm system. The regenerative thermal oxidation unit consists of a central combustion chamber with five lobes extending radially outward. Each lobe is packed with ceramic refractory elements (saddles) which serve as heat exchange media. The elements are retained by perforated refractory blocks on the hot combustion chamber side and by a grating on the cold side. Estimated savings from the system, about a half million dollars the first year, are expected to significantly exceed Congoleum's original estimates. About half of the total savings will result from reduced consumption of natural gas since the unit is fueled mainly by the organic material in the process exhaust. The other half of the savings has resulted from improvements in production efficiency and the recycling of waste heat from the thermal oxidizer.« less

  2. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  3. Flow units perspective on elastic recovery under sharp contact loading in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, K.; Gulzar, A.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    The obscure nature of glass physics has led to develop various correlations between different parameters and properties of metallic glasses. Despite these correlations, the clear picture of plastic deformation is still lacking. We have measured elastic recovery in metallic glasses by indentation, and found the elastic recovery correlate with different properties and parameters of metallic glasses. All these observations can be quite well explained with flow unit model which could provide clearer picture on the plastic deformations and nature of the metallic glasses.

  4. Extravehicular mobility unit thermal simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.; Phillips, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    The analytical methods, thermal model, and user's instructions for the SIM bay extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) routine are presented. This digital computer program was developed for detailed thermal performance predictions of the crewman performing a command module extravehicular activity during transearth coast. It accounts for conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer as well as fluid flow and associated flow control components. The program is a derivative of the Apollo lunar surface EMU digital simulator. It has the operational flexibility to accept card or magnetic tape for both the input data and program logic. Output can be tabular and/or plotted and the mission simulation can be stopped and restarted at the discretion of the user. The program was developed for the NASA-JSC Univac 1108 computer system and several of the capabilities represent utilization of unique features of that system. Analytical methods used in the computer routine are based on finite difference approximations to differential heat and mass balance equations which account for temperature or time dependent thermo-physical properties.

  5. Autonomous Electrothermal Facility for Oil Recovery Intensification Fed by Wind Driven Power Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsky, Aleksey A.; Dobush, Vasiliy S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the structure of autonomous facility fed by wind driven power unit for intensification of viscous and heavy crude oil recovery by means of heat impact on productive strata. Computer based service simulation of this facility was performed. Operational energy characteristics were obtained for various operational modes of facility. The optimal resistance of heating element of the downhole heater was determined for maximum operating efficiency of wind power unit.

  6. High-threshold motor unit firing reflects force recovery following a bout of damaging eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Lewis J; Hunter, Angus M

    2018-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is associated with impaired muscle function and reduced neuromuscular recruitment. However, motor unit firing behaviour throughout the recovery period is unclear. EIMD impairment of maximal voluntary force (MVC) will, in part, be caused by reduced high-threshold motor unit firing, which will subsequently increase to recover MVC. Fourteen healthy active males completed a bout of eccentric exercise on the knee extensors, with measurements of MVC, rate of torque development and surface electromyography performed pre-exercise and 2, 3, 7 and 14 days post-exercise, on both damaged and control limb. EIMD was associated with decreased MVC (235.2 ± 49.3 Nm vs. 161.3 ± 52.5 Nm; p <0.001) and rate of torque development (495.7 ± 136.9 Nm.s-1 vs. 163.4 ± 163.7 Nm.s-1; p <0.001) 48h post-exercise. Mean motor unit firing rate was reduced (16.4 ± 2.2 Hz vs. 12.6 ± 1.7 Hz; p <0.01) in high-threshold motor units only, 48h post-exercise, and common drive was elevated (0.36 ± 0.027 vs. 0.56 ± 0.032; p< 0.001) 48h post-exercise. The firing rate of high-threshold motor units was reduced in parallel with impaired muscle function, whilst early recruited motor units remained unaltered. Common drive of motor units increased in offset to the firing rate impairment. These alterations correlated with the recovery of force decrement, but not of pain elevation. This study provides fresh insight into the central mechanisms associated with EIMD recovery, relative to muscle function. These findings may in turn lead to development of novel management and preventative procedures.

  7. High-threshold motor unit firing reflects force recovery following a bout of damaging eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Macgregor, Lewis J.

    2018-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is associated with impaired muscle function and reduced neuromuscular recruitment. However, motor unit firing behaviour throughout the recovery period is unclear. EIMD impairment of maximal voluntary force (MVC) will, in part, be caused by reduced high-threshold motor unit firing, which will subsequently increase to recover MVC. Fourteen healthy active males completed a bout of eccentric exercise on the knee extensors, with measurements of MVC, rate of torque development and surface electromyography performed pre-exercise and 2, 3, 7 and 14 days post-exercise, on both damaged and control limb. EIMD was associated with decreased MVC (235.2 ± 49.3 Nm vs. 161.3 ± 52.5 Nm; p <0.001) and rate of torque development (495.7 ± 136.9 Nm.s-1 vs. 163.4 ± 163.7 Nm.s-1; p <0.001) 48h post-exercise. Mean motor unit firing rate was reduced (16.4 ± 2.2 Hz vs. 12.6 ± 1.7 Hz; p <0.01) in high-threshold motor units only, 48h post-exercise, and common drive was elevated (0.36 ± 0.027 vs. 0.56 ± 0.032; p< 0.001) 48h post-exercise. The firing rate of high-threshold motor units was reduced in parallel with impaired muscle function, whilst early recruited motor units remained unaltered. Common drive of motor units increased in offset to the firing rate impairment. These alterations correlated with the recovery of force decrement, but not of pain elevation. This study provides fresh insight into the central mechanisms associated with EIMD recovery, relative to muscle function. These findings may in turn lead to development of novel management and preventative procedures. PMID:29630622

  8. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Cccc of... - Emission Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or That Commenced Reconstruction or... Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Pt. 60, Subpt. CCCC, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart CCCC of Part 60—Emission Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced...

  9. Thermal control unit for long-time survival of scientific instruments on lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kazunori; Iijima, Yuichi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    A thermal control unit (lunar survival module) is being developed for scientific instruments placed on the lunar surface. This unit is designed to be used on the future Japanese lunar landing mission SELENE-2. The lunar surface is a severe environment for scientific instruments. The absence of convective cooling by an atmosphere makes the ground surface temperature variable in the wide range of -200 to 100 degC, an environment in which space electronics can hardly survive. The surface elements must have a thermal control structure to maintain the inner temperature within the operable ranges of the instruments for long-time measurements, such as 1 month or longer beyond the lunar nights. The objectives of this study are to develop a thermal control unit for the SELENE-2 mission. So far, we conducted the concept design of the lunar survival module, and estimated its potential by a thermal mathematical model on the assumption of using a lunar seismometer designed for SELENE-2. The basic structure of the thermal module is rather simple in that a heat insulating shell covers the scientific instruments. The concept is that the conical insulator retains heat in the regolith soil in the daylight, and it can keep the device warm in the night. Results of the model calculations indicated the high potential of long-time survival. A bread board model (BBM) was manufactured, and its thermal-vacuum tests were conducted in order to estimate the validity of some thermal parameters assumed in the computed thermal model. The thermal condition of the lunar surface was simulated by glass beads paved in a vacuum chamber, and a temperature-controlled container. Temperature variations of the BBM in thermal cycling tests were compared to a thermal mathematical model, and the thermal parameters were finally assessed. Feeding the test results back into the thermal model for the lunar surface, some thermal parameters were updated but there was no critical effect on the survivability. The

  10. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous...

  11. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous...

  12. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous...

  13. Coarse-grained simulation of molecular mechanisms of recovery in thermally activated shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abberton, Brendan C.; Liu, Wing Kam; Keten, Sinan

    2013-12-01

    Thermally actuated shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are capable of being programmed into a temporary shape and then recovering their permanent reference shape upon exposure to heat, which facilitates a phase transition that allows dramatic increase in molecular mobility. Experimental, analytical, and computational studies have established empirical relations of the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs that have been instrumental in device design. However, the underlying mechanisms of the recovery behavior and dependence on polymer microstructure remain to be fully understood for copolymer systems. This presents an opportunity for bottom-up studies through molecular modeling; however, the limited time-scales of atomistic simulations prohibit the study of key performance metrics pertaining to recovery. In order to elucidate the effects of phase fraction, recovery temperature, and deformation temperature on shape recovery, here we investigate the shape-memory behavior in a copolymer model with coarse-grained potentials using a two-phase molecular model that reproduces physical crosslinking. Our simulation protocol allows observation of upwards of 90% strain recovery in some cases, at time-scales that are on the order of the timescale of the relevant relaxation mechanism (stress relaxation in the unentangled soft-phase). Partial disintegration of the glassy phase during mechanical deformation is found to contribute to irrecoverable strain. Temperature dependence of the recovery indicates nearly full elastic recovery above the trigger temperature, which is near the glass-transition temperature of the rubbery switching matrix. We find that the trigger temperature is also directly correlated with the deformation temperature, indicating that deformation temperature influences the recovery temperatures required to obtain a given amount of shape recovery, until the plateau regions overlap above the transition region. Increasing the fraction of glassy phase results in higher strain

  14. An investigation of the thermal shock resistance of lunar regolith and the recovery of hydrogen from lunar soil heated using microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop a better understanding of the thermal shock properties of lunar regolith sintered using 2.45 GHz electromagnetic radiation and to do a preliminary study into the recovery of bound hydrogen in lunar soil heated using 2.45 GHz radiation. During the first phase of this work, lunar simulant material was used to test whether or not microhardness data could be used to infer thermal shock resistance and later actual lunar regolith was used. Results are included on the lunar regolith since this is of primary concern and not the simulant results. They were similar, however. The second phase investigated the recovery of hydrogen from lunar regolith and results indicate that microwave heating of lunar regolith may be a good method for recovery of bound gases in the regolith.

  15. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Emission Limitations That Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011 7 Table 7 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60 Protection of... Waste Incineration Units Pt. 60, Subpt. DDDD, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60—Model Rule—Emission Limitations That Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011 [Date to be specified in state...

  16. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Emission Limitations That Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011 7 Table 7 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60 Protection of... Waste Incineration Units Pt. 60, Subpt. DDDD, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60—Model Rule—Emission Limitations That Apply to Energy Recovery Units After May 20, 2011 [Date to be specified in state...

  17. Effect of biomimetic non-smooth unit morphology on thermal fatigue behavior of H13 hot-work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chao; Zhou, Hong; Cong, Dalong; Wang, Chuanwei; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2012-06-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of hot-work tool steel processed by a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process gets a remarkable improvement compared to untreated sample. The 'dowel pin effect', the 'dam effect' and the 'fence effect' of non-smooth units are the main reason of the conspicuous improvement of the thermal fatigue behavior. In order to get a further enhancement of the 'dowel pin effect', the 'dam effect' and the 'fence effect', this study investigated the effect of different unit morphologies (including 'prolate', 'U' and 'V' morphology) and the same unit morphology in different sizes on the thermal fatigue behavior of H13 hot-work tool steel. The results showed that the 'U' morphology unit had the optimum thermal fatigue behavior, then the 'V' morphology which was better than the 'prolate' morphology unit; when the unit morphology was identical, the thermal fatigue behavior of the sample with large unit sizes was better than that of the small sizes.

  18. Thermal Recovery from Cold-Working in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenen, A. D.; Webster, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-working of most thermocouples has a significant, direct impact on the Seebeck coefficient which can lead to regions of thermoelectric inhomogeneity and accelerated drift. Cold-working can occur during the wire swaging process, when winding the wire onto a bobbin, or during handling by the end user—either accidentally or deliberately. Swaging-induced cold-work in thermocouples, if uniformly applied, may result in a high level of homogeneity. However, on exposure to elevated temperatures, the subsequent recovery process from the cold-working can then result in significant drift, and this can in turn lead to erroneous temperature measurements, often in excess of the specified manufacturer tolerances. Several studies have investigated the effects of cold-work in Type K thermocouples usually by bending, or swaging. However, the amount of cold-work applied to the thermocouple is often difficult to quantify, as the mechanisms for applying the strains are typically nonlinear when applied in this fashion. A repeatable level of cold-working is applied to the different wires using a tensional loading apparatus to apply a known yield displacement to the thermoelements. The effects of thermal recovery from cold-working can then be accurately quantified as a function of temperature, using a linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner. Variation in these effects due to differing alloy compositions in Type K wire is also explored, which is obtained by sourcing wire from a selection of manufacturers. The information gathered in this way will inform users of Type K thermocouples about the potential consequences of varying levels of cold-working and its impact on the Seebeck coefficient at a range of temperatures between ˜ 70°C and 600° C. This study will also guide users on the temperatures required to rapidly alleviate the effects of cold-working using thermal annealing treatments.

  19. Minimizing temperature instability of heat recovery hot water system utilizing optimized thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suamir, I. N.; Sukadana, I. B. P.; Arsana, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    One energy-saving technology that starts gaining attractive for hotel industry application in Indonesia is the utilization of waste heat of a central air conditioning system to heat water for domestic hot water supply system. Implementing the technology for such application at a hotel was found that hot water capacity generated from the heat recovery system could satisfy domestic hot water demand of the hotel. The gas boilers installed in order to back up the system have never been used. The hot water supply, however, was found to be instable with hot water supply temperature fluctuated ranging from 45 °C to 62 °C. The temperature fluctuations reaches 17 °C, which is considered instable and can reduce hot water usage comfort level. This research is aimed to optimize the thermal energy storage in order to minimize the temperature instability of heat recovery hot water supply system. The research is a case study approach based on cooling and hot water demands of a hotel in Jakarta-Indonesia that has applied water cooled chillers with heat recovery systems. The hotel operation with 329 guest rooms and 8 function rooms showed that hot water production in the heat recovery system completed with 5 m3 thermal energy storage (TES) could not hold the hot water supply temperature constantly. The variations of the cooling demand and hot water demands day by day were identified. It was found that there was significant mismatched of available time (hours) between cooling demand which is directly correlated to the hot water production from the heat recovery system and hot water usage. The available TES system could not store heat rejected from the condenser of the chiller during cooling demand peak time between 14.00 and 18.00 hours. The extra heat from the heat recovery system consequently increases the temperature of hot water up to 62 °C. It is about 12 K above 50 °C the requirement hot water temperature of the hotel. In contrast, the TES could not deliver proper

  20. Physical and thermal processing of Waste Printed Circuit Boards aiming for the recovery of gold and copper.

    PubMed

    Ventura, E; Futuro, A; Pinho, S C; Almeida, M F; Dias, J M

    2018-06-20

    The recovery of electronic waste to obtain secondary raw materials is a subject of high relevance in the context of circular economy. Accordingly, the present work relies on the evaluation of mining separation/concentration techniques (comminution, size screening, magnetic separation and gravity concentration) alone as well as combined with thermal pre-treatment to recover gold and copper from Waste Printed Circuit Boards. For that purpose, Waste Printed Circuit Boards were subjected to physical processing (comminution, size screening in 6 classes from <0.425 mm to > 6.70 mm, magnetic separation and gravity concentration) alone and combined with thermal treatment (200-500 °C), aiming the recovery of gold and copper. Mixed motherboards and graphic cards (Lot 1 and 3) and highly rich components (connectors separated from memory cards, Lot 2) were analyzed. Gold and copper concentrations were determined before and after treatment. Before treatment, concentrations from 0.01 to 0.6 % wt. and from 9 to 20 % wt. were found for gold and copper respectively. The highest concentrations were observed in the size fractions between 0.425 and 1.70 mm. The highest copper concentration was around 35 % wt. (class 0.425-0.85 mm) and when analyzing memory card connectors alone, gold concentrations reached almost 2% in the same class, reflecting the interest of separating such components. The physical treatment alone was more effective for Lot 1/3, compared to Lot 2, allowing recoveries of 67 % wt. and 87 % wt. for gold and copper respectively, mostly due to differences in particles size and shape. The thermal treatment showed unperceptive influence on gold concentration but significant effect for copper concentration, mostly attributed to the size of the copper particles. Concentrations increased in a factor of around 10 when the thermal treatment was performed at 300 °C for the larger particles (1.70-6.70 mm); the best results were obtained at 400 °C for the

  1. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  2. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  3. Experience in connecting the power generating units of thermal power plants to automatic secondary frequency regulation within the united power system of Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. V.; Komarov, A. N.; Safronov, A. N.

    The principles of central control of the power generating units of thermal power plants by automatic secondary frequency and active power overcurrent regulation systems, and the algorithms for interactions between automatic power control systems for the power production units in thermal power plants and centralized systems for automatic frequency and power regulation, are discussed. The order of switching the power generating units of thermal power plants over to control by a centralized system for automatic frequency and power regulation and by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation is presented. The results of full-scale system tests ofmore » the control of power generating units of the Kirishskaya, Stavropol, and Perm GRES (State Regional Electric Power Plants) by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation at the United Power System of Russia on September 23-25, 2008, are reported.« less

  4. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  5. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    SciTech Connect

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  6. Development of an Organic Rankine Cycle system for exhaust energy recovery in internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, Roberto; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Gualtieri, Angelo; Di Battista, Davide; Mauriello, Marco; Fatigati, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Road transportation is currently one of the most influencing sectors for global energy consumptions and CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, more than one third of the fuel energy supplied to internal combustion engines is still rejected to the environment as thermal waste at the exhaust. Therefore, a greater fuel economy might be achieved recovering the energy from exhaust gases and converting it into useful power on board. In the current research activity, an ORC-based energy recovery system was developed and coupled with a diesel engine. The innovative feature of the recovery power unit relies upon the usage of sliding vane rotary machines as pump and expander. After a preliminary exhaust gas mapping, which allowed to assess the magnitude of the thermal power to be recovered, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out to design the ORC system and the sliding vane machines using R236fa as working fluid. An experimental campaign was eventually performed at different operating regimes according to the ESC procedure and investigated the recovery potential of the power unit at design and off-design conditions. Mechanical power recovered ranged from 0.7 kW up to 1.9 kW, with an overall cycle efficiency from 3.8% up to 4.8% respectively. These results candidate sliding vane machines as efficient and reliable devices for waste heat recovery applications.

  7. Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) / International Space Station (ISS) Coolant Loop Failure and Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Cole, Harold; Cronin, Gary; Gazda, Daniel B.; Steele, John

    2006-01-01

    Following the Colombia accident, the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) onboard ISS were unused for several months. Upon startup, the units experienced a failure in the coolant system. This failure resulted in the loss of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the US segment of ISS. With limited on-orbit evidence, a team of chemists, engineers, metallurgists, and microbiologists were able to identify the cause of the failure and develop recovery hardware and procedures. As a result of this work, the ISS crew regained the capability to perform EVAs from the US segment of the ISS.

  8. An overview of metals recovery from thermal power plant solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Meawad, Amr S; Bojinova, Darinka Y; Pelovski, Yoncho G

    2010-12-01

    Thermal power plants (TPPs) that burn fossil fuels emit several pollutants linked to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and the possibility of global climate change. As coal is burned in a power plant, its noncombustible mineral content is partitioned into bottom ash, which remains in the furnace, and fly ash, which rises with flue gases. Two other by-products of coal combustion air-pollution control technologies are flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes and fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) wastes. This paper analyzed and summarized the generation, characteristics and application of TPP solid wastes and discussed the potential effects of such solid wastes on the environment. On this basis, a review of a number of methods for recovery of metals from TPP solid wastes was made. They usually contain a quantity of valuable metals and they are actually a secondary resource of metals. By applying mineral processing technologies and hydrometallurgical and biohydrometallurgical processes, it is possible to recover metals such as Al, Ga, Ge, Ca, Cd, Fe, Hg, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Ra, Th, V, Zn, etc., from TPP solid wastes. Recovery of metals from such wastes and its utilization are important not only for saving metal resources, but also for protecting the environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved heat recovery and high-temperature clean-up for coal-gas fired combustion turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Barthelemy, N.M.; Lynn, S.

    1991-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of an Improved Heat Recovery Method (IHRM) applied to a coal-gas fired power-generating system using a high-temperature clean-up. This heat recovery process has been described by Higdon and Lynn (1990). The IHRM is an integrated heat-recovery network that significantly increases the thermal efficiency of a gas turbine in the generation of electric power. Its main feature is to recover both low- and high-temperature heat reclaimed from various gas streams by means of evaporating heated water into combustion air in an air saturation unit. This unit is a packed column where compressed air flows countercurrently tomore » the heated water prior to being sent to the combustor, where it is mixed with coal-gas and burned. The high water content of the air stream thus obtained reduces the amount of excess air required to control the firing temperature of the combustor, which in turn lowers the total work of compression and results in a high thermal efficiency. Three designs of the IHRM were developed to accommodate three different gasifying process. The performances of those designs were evaluated and compared using computer simulations. The efficiencies obtained with the IHRM are substantially higher those yielded by other heat-recovery technologies using the same gasifying processes. The study also revealed that the IHRM compares advantageously to most advanced power-generation technologies currently available or tested commercially. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.« less

  10. Recovery of arctic tundra from thermal erosion disturbance is constrained by nutrient accumulation: a modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, A R; Rastetter, E B; Kwiatkowski, B L; Bowden, W B; Mack, M C; Jiang, Y

    2015-07-01

    Abstract. We calibrated the Multiple Element Limitation (MEL) model to Alaskan arctic tundra to simulate recovery of thermal erosion features (TEFs) caused by permafrost thaw and mass wasting. TEFs could significantly alter regional carbon (C) and nutrient budgets because permafrost soils contain large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) and TEFs are expected to become more frequent as the climate warms. We simulated recovery following TEF stabilization and did not address initial, short-term losses of C and nutrients during TEF formation. To capture the variability among and within TEFs, we modeled a range of post-stabilization conditions by varying the initial size of SOM stocks and nutrient supply rates. Simulations indicate that nitrogen (N) losses after the TEF stabilizes are small, but phosphorus (P) losses continue. Vegetation biomass recovered 90% of its undisturbed C, N, and P stocks in 100 years using nutrients mineralized from SOM. Because of low litter inputs but continued decomposition, younger SOM continued to be lost for 10 years after the TEF began to recover, but recovered to about 84% of its undisturbed amount in 100 years. The older recalcitrant SOM in mineral soil continued to be lost throughout the 100-year simulation. Simulations suggest that biomass recovery depended on the amount of SOM remaining after disturbance. Recovery was initially limited by the photosynthetic capacity of vegetation but became co-limited by N and P once a plant canopy developed. Biomass and SOM recovery was enhanced by increasing nutrient supplies, but the magnitude, source, and controls on these supplies are poorly understood. Faster mineralization of nutrients from SOM (e.g., by warming) enhanced vegetation recovery but delayed recovery of SOM. Taken together, these results suggest that although vegetation and surface SOM on TEFs recovered quickly (25 and 100 years, respectively), the recovery of deep, mineral soil SOM took centuries and represented a major

  11. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for HAP Emissions...

  12. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for HAP Emissions...

  13. Lower food chain community study: thermal effects and post-thermal recovery in the streams and swamps of the Savannah River Plant, November 1983-May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratieff, B.C.; Kondratieff, P.

    1985-04-01

    This report documents a study of lower food chain (autotroph and macroinvertebrate assemblage) response to, and recovery from, thermal stress in the streams and swamps of the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Data for the report were collected between November 1983 and May 1984. Elevated water temperature regimes in the thermal streams and swamps resulted in generally simplified lower food chain community structure. Thermally tolerant forms of both autotrophs (blue-green algae) and macroinvertebrates (oligochaetes, nematodes, snails and midges) were able to maintain populations in thermally stressed areas. The thermally tolerant taxa found in the perturbed streams and swamps often had highmore » densities and biomass. It would appear tht many of the macroinvertebrate species occurring in SRP streams and swamps evolved in habitats subject to great thermal variation, both diel and seasonal. Based on the results of this study, certain temperature ranges are associated with certain general effects on the lower food chain. In temperatures >40/sup 0/C most taxa are eliminated, from 30 to 40/sup 0/C a stressed community exists with a few tolerant taxa and from 25 to 30/sup 0/C an assemblage resembling a summer ambient community in structure and function exists, often with reduced species composition. 74 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)« less

  14. Characterization and Thermal Properties of Nitrate Based Molten Salt for Heat Recovery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal Tukimon, Mohd; Muhammad, Wan Nur Azrina Wan; Nor Annuar Mohamad, Md; Yusof, Farazila

    2017-10-01

    Molten salt can acts like a storage medium or heat transfer fluid in heat recovery system. Heat transfer fluid is a fluid that has the capability to deliver heat this one side to another while heat recovery system is a system that transfers heat to produce energy. This studies shows about determining the new formulation of different molten nitrate/nitrite salts consisting of LiNO3, KNO2, KNO3 and NaNO2 that give a low temperature of melting point and high average specific heat capacity. Mixed alkaline molten nitrate/nitrite salt can act as a heat transfer fluid due to their advantageous in terms of its properties that feasible in heat recovery system such as high specific heat capacity, low vapour pressure, low cost and wide range of temperature in its application. The mixing of these primary substances will form a new line of quaternary nitrate salt (LiNO3 - KNO2 - KNO3 - NaNO2). The quaternary mixture was heated inside the box furnace at 150°C for four hours and rose up the temperature to 400°C for eight hours to homogenize the mixture. Through heating process, the elements of nitrate/nitrite base were mixed completely. The temperature was then reduced to 115°C for several hours before removing the mixture from the furnace. The melting point of each sample were testified by using thermal gravimetric analysis, TGA/DTA and experiment of determining the specific heat capacity were conducted by using Differential Scanning Calorimeter, DSC. From the result, it is found that the melting point Sample 1 with percentage of weightage (25.4wt% of LiNO3, 33.8wt% of KNO2, 20.7wt% of KNO3 and 20.1wt% of NaNO2) is 94.4°C whereas the average specific heat capacity was 1.0484/g°C while for Sample 3 with percentages of weightage (30.0wt% of LiNO3, 50.2wt% of KNO2, 3.1wt% of KNO3 and 16.7wt% of NaNO2), the melting point is 86.1°C with average specific heat capacity of 0.7274 J/g°C. In the nut shell, the quaternary mixture salts had been a good mixture with good thermal

  15. Study of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Masaaki; Umemiya, Hiromichi; Shibuya, Ikuko; Haga, Eiji

    Yamagata University 'Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES)' is the experimental system which has been running since 1982. From the results for along terms of experiments, we obtain many important knowledge. This paper presents the accomplishments for 16 years and the characteristics of thermal energy storage in thermal energy storage well. The conclusions show as follows. 1)In recent years, the thermal recovery factor of warm energy storage well becomes almost constant at about 60%. 2) The thermal recovery factor of cool energy storage well increases gradually and becomes at about 15%. 3) Since the ferric colloidal dam is formed in aquifer, thermal recovery factor increase year after year. 4) Back wash can remove clogging for ferric colloidal dam. 5) The apparent thermal diffusivity decrease gradually due to ferric colloidal dam.

  16. Energy recovery from thermal treatment of dewatered sludge in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingfeng; Dussan, Karla; Monaghan, Rory F D; Zhan, Xinmin

    Sewage sludge is a by-product generated from municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) processes. This study examines the conversion of sludge via energy recovery from gasification/combustion for thermal treatment of dewatered sludge. The present analysis is based on a chemical equilibrium model of thermal conversion of previously dewatered sludge with moisture content of 60-80%. Prior to combustion/gasification, sludge is dried to a moisture content of 25-55% by two processes: (1) heat recovered from syngas/flue gas cooling and (2) heat recovered from syngas combustion. The electricity recovered from the combined heat and power process can be reused in syngas cleaning and in the WWT plant. Gas temperature, total heat and electricity recoverable are evaluated using the model. Results show that generation of electricity from dewatered sludge with low moisture content (≤ 70%) is feasible within a self-sufficient sludge treatment process. Optimal conditions for gasification correspond to an equivalence ratio of 2.3 and dried sludge moisture content of 25%. Net electricity generated from syngas combustion can account for 0.071 kWh/m(3) of wastewater treated, which is up to 25.4-28.4% of the WWT plant's total energy consumption.

  17. An Overview of Opportunities for Waste Heat Recovery and Thermal Integration in the Primary Aluminum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Cassandre; Gosselin, Louis

    2012-08-01

    Efficient smelters currently consume roughly 13 MWh of electricity per ton of aluminum, while roughly half of that energy is lost as thermal waste. Although waste heat is abundant, current thermal integration in primary aluminum facilities remains limited. This is due to both the low quality of waste heat available and the shortage of potential uses within reasonable distance of identified waste heat sources. In this article, we present a mapping of both heat dissipation processes and heat demands around a sample facility (Alcoa Deschambault Quebec smelter). Our primary aim is to report opportunities for heat recovery and integration in the primary aluminum industry. We consider potential heat-to-sink pairings individually and assess their thermodynamic potential for producing energy savings.

  18. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Monitoring Systems for...

  19. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With HAP...

  20. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Monitoring Systems for...

  1. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance With HAP...

  2. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance With HAP...

  3. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With HAP...

  4. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance With HAP...

  5. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Monitoring Systems for...

  6. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With HAP...

  7. Assessment of thermal efficiency of heat recovery coke making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, H. P.; Saxena, V. K.; Haldar, S. K.; Sriramoju, S. K.

    2017-08-01

    The heat recovery stamp charge coke making process is quite complicated due to the evolved volatile matter during coking, is partially combusted in oven crown and sole flue in a controlled manner to provide heat for producing metallurgical coke. Therefore, the control and efficient utilization of heat in the oven crown, and sole flue is difficult, which directly affects the operational efficiency. Considering the complexity and importance of thermal efficiency, evolution of different gases, combustion of gasses in oven crown and sole flue, and heating process of coke oven has been studied. A nonlinear regression methodology was used to predict temperature profile of different depth of coal cake during the coking. It was observed that the predicted temperature profile is in good agreement with the actual temperature profile (R2 = 0.98) and is validated with the actual temperature profile of other ovens. A complete study is being done to calculate the material balance, heat balance, and heat losses. This gives an overall understanding of heat flow which affects the heat penetration into the coal cake. The study confirms that 60% heat was utilized during coking.

  8. The status of masked bobwhite recovery in the United States and Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuvlesky, W.P.; Gall, S.A.; Dobrott, S.J.; Tolley, S.; Guthery, F.S.; DeStefano, S.A.; King, N.; Nolte, K.R.; Silvy, N.J.; Lewis, J.C.; Gee, G.; Camou Luders, G.; Engel-Wilson, R.; Brennan, Leonard A.; Palmer, William E.; Burger, Loren W.; Pruden, Teresa L.

    2000-01-01

    The masked bobwhite (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi) is an endangered species currently numbering < 1500 individuals and restricted to 2 locales in southeastern Arizona and northcentral Sonora, Mexico. The subspecies' endangered status is attributed to overgrazing of Sonora savanna grassland that began during the late 1880's and continued well into the 20th century. This overgrazing resulted in the conversion of many native grass pastures to the exotic bufflegrass (Cenchrus ciliaris). The Arizona masked bobwhite population was extirpated around the turn of the century, and the Sonoran population was thought to have disappeared during the 1940's until a small remnant population was discovered on a ranch near Benjamin Hill, Sonora, in 1964. Masked bobwhite recovery efforts have a dynamic, long history of nearly six decades. Current masked bobwhite recovery efforts focus on reestablishing a self-sustainlng population on the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR) in the United States, as well as 2 remnant wild populations located on privately owned ranches in northcentral Sonora.

  9. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials.

  10. Carbon Consequences of Forest Disturbance and Recovery Across the Conterminous United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher A.; Collatz, G. James; Masek, Jeffrey; Goward, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    Forests of North America are thought to constitute a significant long term sink for atmospheric carbon. The United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program has developed a large data base of stock changes derived from consecutive estimates of growing stock volume in the US. These data reveal a large and relatively stable increase in forest carbon stocks over the last two decades or more. The mechanisms underlying this national increase in forest stocks may include recovery of forests from past disturbances, net increases in forest area, and growth enhancement driven by climate or fertilization by CO2 and Nitrogen. Here we estimate the forest recovery component of the observed stock changes using FIA data on the age structure of US forests and carbon stocks as a function of age. The latter are used to parameterize forest disturbance and recovery processes in a carbon cycle model. We then apply resulting disturbance/recovery dynamics to landscapes and regions based on the forest age distributions. The analysis centers on 28 representative climate settings spread about forested regions of the conterminous US. We estimate carbon fluxes for each region and propagate uncertainties in calibration data through to the predicted fluxes. The largest recovery-driven carbon sinks are found in the South central, Pacific Northwest, and Pacific Southwest regions, with spatially averaged net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of about 100 g C / square m / a driven by forest age structure. Carbon sinks from recovery in the Northeast and Northern Lake States remain moderate to large owing to the legacy of historical clearing and relatively low modern disturbance rates from harvest and fire. At the continental scale, we find a conterminous U.S. forest NEP of only 0.16 Pg C/a from age structure in 2005, or only 0.047 Pg C/a of forest stock change after accounting for fire emissions and harvest transfers. Recent estimates of NEP derived from inventory stock change

  11. THERMAL TECHNOLOGY TESTED FOR CONTAMINANT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research project on steam enhanced remediation (SER) for the recovery of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from fractured limestone has been undertaken at the former Loring Air Force Base Quarry site in Limestone, ME. Participants in the project include the Maine Departmen...

  12. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  13. Work disability in the United States, 1968-2015: Prevalence, duration, recovery, and trends.

    PubMed

    Laditka, James N; Laditka, Sarah B

    2018-04-01

    The United States workforce is aging. At the same time more people have chronic conditions, for longer periods. Given these trends the importance of work disability, physical or nervous problems that limit a person's type or amount of work, is increasing. No research has examined transitions among multiple levels of work disability, recovery from work disability, or trends. Limited research has focused on work disability among African Americans and Hispanics, or separately for women and men. We examined these areas using data from 30,563 adults in the 1968-2015 Panel Study of Income Dynamics. We estimated annual probabilities of work disability, recovery, and death with multinomial logistic Markov models. Microsimulations accounting for age and education estimated outcomes for African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white women and men. Results from these nationally representative data suggested that the majority of Americans experience work disability during working life. Most spells ended with recovery or reduced severity. Among women, African Americans and Hispanics had less moderate and severe work disability than whites. Among men, African Americans became severely work disabled more often than whites, recovered from severe spells more often and had shorter severe spells, yet had more severe work disability at age 65. Hispanic men were more likely to report at least one spell of severe work disability than whites; they also had substantially more recovery from severe work disability, and a lower percentage of working years with work disability. Among African Americans and Hispanics, men were considerably more likely than women to have severe work disability at age 65. Work disability declined significantly across the study period for all groups. Although work disability has declined over several decades, it remains common. Results suggest that the majority of work disability spells end with recovery, underscoring the importance of rehabilitation and

  14. Degradation and recovery of iron doped barium titanate single crystals via modulus spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarization current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J. J.; Bayer, T. J. M.; Randall, C. A.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding resistance degradation during the application of DC bias and recovery after removing the DC bias provides insight into failure mechanisms and defects in dielectric materials. In this experiment, modulus spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) techniques were used to characterize the degradation and recovery of iron-doped barium titanate single crystals. Modulus spectroscopy is a very powerful analytical tool applied during degradation and recovery to observe changes in the local conductivity distribution. During degradation, oxygen vacancies migrate to the cathode region, and a counter flow of oxygen anions migrates towards the anode. With increasing time during degradation, the distribution of conductivity broadens only slightly exhibiting crucial differences to iron doped strontium titanate. After removing the DC bias, the recovery shows that a second previously unobserved and distinct conductivity maximum arises in the modulus data. This characteristic with two maxima related to different conductivities in the anode and cathode region is what can be expected from the published defect chemistry. It will be concluded that only the absence of an external electric field during recovery measurements permits the observation of local conductivity measurements without the presence of non-equilibrium conditions such as charge injection. Equilibrium conductivity as a function of oxygen vacancy concentration is described schematically. Oxygen vacancy migration during degradation and recovery is verified by TSDC analysis. We establish a self-consistent rationale of the transient changes in the modulus and TSDC for the iron doped barium titanate single crystal system including electron, hole and oxygen vacancy conductivity. During degradation, the sample fractured.

  15. A Modeling Investigation of Thermal and Strain Induced Recovery and Nonlinear Hardening in Potential Based Viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Saleeb, A. F.; Wilt, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Specific forms for both the Gibb's and the complementary dissipation potentials were chosen such that a complete potential based multiaxial, isothermal, viscoplastic model was obtained. This model in general possesses three internal state variables (two scalars associated with dislocation density and one tensor associated with dislocation motion) both thermal and dynamic recovery mechanisms, and nonlinear kinematic hardening. This general model, although possessing associated flow and evolutionary laws, is shown to emulate three distinct classes of theories found in the literature, by modification of the driving threshold function F. A parametric study was performed on a specialized nondimensional multiaxial form containing only a single tensorial internal state variable (i.e., internal stress). The study was conducted with the idea of examining the impact of including a strain-induced recovery mechanism and the compliance operator, derived from the Gibb's potential, on the uniaxial and multiaxial response. One important finding was that inclusion of strain recovery provided the needed flexibility in modeling stress-strain and creep response of metals at low homologous temperatures, without adversely affecting the high temperature response. Furthermore, for nonproportional loading paths, the inclusion of the compliance operator had a significant influence on the multiaxial response, but had no influence on either uniaxial or proportional load histories.

  16. Recovery in dc and rf performance of off-state step-stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Ahn, Shihyun

    The recovery effects of thermal annealing on dc and rf performance of off-state step-stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors were investigated. After stress, reverse gate leakage current and sub-threshold swing increased and drain current on-off ratio decreased. However, these degradations were completely recovered after thermal annealing at 450 °C for 10 mins for devices stressed either once or twice. The trap densities, which were estimated by temperature-dependent drain-current sub-threshold swing measurements, increased after off-state step-stress and were reduced after subsequent thermal annealing. In addition, the small signal rf characteristics of stressed devices were completely recovered after thermal annealing.

  17. Logic design for dynamic and interactive recovery.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. C.; Jessep, D. C.; Wadia, A. B.; Schneider, P. R.; Bouricius, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    Recovery in a fault-tolerant computer means the continuation of system operation with data integrity after an error occurs. This paper delineates two parallel concepts embodied in the hardware and software functions required for recovery; detection, diagnosis, and reconfiguration for hardware, data integrity, checkpointing, and restart for the software. The hardware relies on the recovery variable set, checking circuits, and diagnostics, and the software relies on the recovery information set, audit, and reconstruct routines, to characterize the system state and assist in recovery when required. Of particular utility is a handware unit, the recovery control unit, which serves as an interface between error detection and software recovery programs in the supervisor and provides dynamic interactive recovery.

  18. Influence of coatings on the thermal and mechanical processes at insulating glass units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkova, Nina; Krumov, Kalin; Surleva, Andriana; Geshkova, Zlatka

    2017-09-01

    Different coatings on structural glass are used in the advances transparent facades and window systems in order to increase the thermal performance of the glass units and to regulate their optical properties. Coated glass has a higher absorptance in the solar spectrum which leads to correspondent higher temperature in the presence of solar load compared to the uncoated one. That process results in higher climatic loads at the insulating glass units (IGU) and in thermal stresses in the coated glass elements. Temperature fields and gradients in glass panes and climatic loads at IGU in window systems are estimated at different coating of glazed system. The study is implemented by numerical simulation of conjugate heat transfer in the window systems at summer time and presence of solar irradiation, as well as during winter night time.

  19. Global Thermal Power Plants Database: Unit-Based CO2, SO2, NOX and PM2.5 Emissions in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, D.; Qiang, Z.; Davis, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    There are more than 30,000 thermal power plants now operating worldwide, reflecting a tremendously diverse infrastructure that includes units burning oil, natural gas, coal and biomass and ranging in capacity from <1MW to >1GW. Although the electricity generated by this infrastructure is vital to economic activities across the world, it also produces more CO2 and air pollution emissions than any other industry sector. Here we present a new database of global thermal power-generating units and their emissions as of 2010, GPED (Global Power Emissions Database), including the detailed unit information of installed capacity, operation year, geographic location, fuel type and control measures for more than 70000 units. In this study, we have compiled, combined, and harmonized the available underlying data related to thermal power-generating units (e.g. eGRID of USA, CPED of China and published Indian power plants database), and then analyzed the generating capacity, capacity factor, fuel type, age, location, and installed pollution-control technology in order to determine those units with disproportionately high levels of emissions. In total, this work is of great importance for improving spatial distribution of global thermal power plants emissions and exploring their environmental impacts at global scale.

  20. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sulfur Oxides 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From...

  1. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sulfur Oxides 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From...

  2. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sulfur Oxides 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur...

  3. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sulfur Oxides 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From...

  4. High-temperature thermal destruction of poultry derived wastes for energy recovery in Australia.

    PubMed

    Florin, N H; Maddocks, A R; Wood, S; Harris, A T

    2009-04-01

    The high-temperature thermal destruction of poultry derived wastes (e.g., manure and bedding) for energy recovery is viable in Australia when considering resource availability and equivalent commercial-scale experience in the UK. In this work, we identified and examined the opportunities and risks associated with common thermal destruction techniques, including: volume of waste, costs, technological risks and environmental impacts. Typical poultry waste streams were characterised based on compositional analysis, thermodynamic equilibrium modelling and non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry (TG-MS). Poultry waste is highly variable but otherwise comparable with other biomass fuels. The major technical and operating challenges are associated with this variability in terms of: moisture content, presence of inorganic species and type of litter. This variability is subject to a range of parameters including: type and age of bird, and geographical and seasonal inconsistencies. There are environmental and health considerations associated with combustion and gasification due to the formation of: NO(X), SO(X), H(2)S and HCl gas. Mitigation of these emissions is achievable through correct plant design and operation, however, with significant economic penalty. Based on our analysis and literature data, we present cost estimates for generic poultry-waste-fired power plants with throughputs of 2 and 8 tonnes/h.

  5. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With...

  6. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With...

  7. Thermal equipment usage patterns in neonatal intensive care units: interunit variability and intraunit consistency.

    PubMed

    Seguin, J; Hayes, J

    1997-05-01

    We conducted a survey and audit of thermal equipment use in very low-birth-weight infants in five Ohio neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) to document regional practice. The survey indicated a variety of thermal care styles. Two NICUs preferred to admit infants to incubators, the other three favoring radiant warmers. These three NICUs moved infants from radiant warmers into incubators at significantly different mean ages. The audit demonstrated inconsistent use of plastic covers, warming mattresses, and added humidity under radiant warmers, and discrepancies between survey responses and actual use within NICUs. Inter-NICU variability of thermal equipment use may complicate fluid management.

  8. Investigation on thermal environment improvement by waste heat recovery in the underground station in Qingdao metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianwei; Liu, Jiaquan; Wang, Fengyin; Wang, Cuiping

    2018-03-01

    The thermal environment parameters, like the temperature and air velocity, are measured to investigate the heat comfort status of metro staff working area in winter in Qingdao. The temperature is affected obviously by the piston wind from the train and waiting hall in the lower Hall, and the temperature is not satisfied with the least heat comfort temperature of 16 °C. At the same time, the heat produced by the electrical and control equipments is brought by the cooling air to atmosphere for the equipment safety. Utilizing the water-circulating heat pump, it is feasible to transfer the emission heat to the staff working area to improve the thermal environment. Analyzed the feasibility from the technique and economy when using the heat pump, the water-circulating heat pump could be the best way to realize the waste heat recovery and to help the heat comfort of staff working area in winter in the underground metro station in north China.

  9. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  10. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National...

  11. Nuclear thermal source transfer unit, post-blast soil sample drying system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ralph S.; Valencia, Matthew J

    Los Alamos National Laboratory states that its mission is “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) programs exists to engage undergraduate students in STEM work by providing opportunity to work at DOE facilities. As an undergraduate mechanical engineering intern under the SULI program at Los Alamos during the fall semester of 2016, I had the opportunity to contribute to the mission of the Laboratory while developing skills in a STEM discipline. I worked with Technology Applications, an engineering group that supports non-proliferation, counter terrorism, and emergency response missions. This group specializes in toolmore » design, weapons engineering, rapid prototyping, and mission training. I assisted with two major projects during my appointment Los Alamos. The first was a thermal source transportation unit, intended to safely contain a nuclear thermal source during transit. The second was a soil drying unit for use in nuclear postblast field sample collection. These projects have given me invaluable experience working alongside a team of professional engineers. Skills developed include modeling, simulation, group design, product and system design, and product testing.« less

  12. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Recovery procedures. 537.10 Section 537.10... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.10 Recovery procedures. (a) Recovery personnel have three means of enforcing recovery following initial assertion. (1) Referral to litigation pursuant to § 537.11; (2) The...

  13. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recovery procedures. 537.10 Section 537.10... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.10 Recovery procedures. (a) Recovery personnel have three means of enforcing recovery following initial assertion. (1) Referral to litigation pursuant to § 537.11; (2) The...

  14. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recovery procedures. 537.10 Section 537.10... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.10 Recovery procedures. (a) Recovery personnel have three means of enforcing recovery following initial assertion. (1) Referral to litigation pursuant to § 537.11; (2) The...

  15. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recovery procedures. 537.10 Section 537.10... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.10 Recovery procedures. (a) Recovery personnel have three means of enforcing recovery following initial assertion. (1) Referral to litigation pursuant to § 537.11; (2) The...

  16. 32 CFR 537.10 - Recovery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Recovery procedures. 537.10 Section 537.10... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.10 Recovery procedures. (a) Recovery personnel have three means of enforcing recovery following initial assertion. (1) Referral to litigation pursuant to § 537.11; (2) The...

  17. Utilization of automotive shredder residues in a thermal process for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, N M; Belardi, G; Medici, F; Piga, L

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study is the recovery by thermal treatment of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, on the basis of the different phase change temperatures of the two metal-bearing phases. ASR (Automotive Shredder Residue), containing 68% of carbon, was added to the mixture to act as a reductant to metallic Zn of the zinc-bearing phases. The mixture was subsequently heated in different atmospheres (air, CO2 and N2) and at different temperatures (900°C, 1000°C and 1200°C) and stoichiometric excess of ASR (300%, 600% and 900%). Characterization of the mixture and of the residues of thermal treatment was carried out by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA, SEM and XRD. The results show that recovery of 99% of zinc (grade 97%) is achieved at 1000°C in N2 with a stoichiometric excess of car-fluff of 900%. This product could be suitable for production of new batteries after refining by hydrometallurgical way. Recovery of Mn around 98% in the residue of the treatment is achieved at any temperature and atmosphere tested with a grade of 57% at 900% excess of car-fluff. This residue is enriched in manganese oxide and could be used in the production of iron-manganese alloys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recovery of lead from lead paste in spent lead acid battery by hydrometallurgical desulfurization and vacuum thermal reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunjian; Qiu, Keqiang

    2015-06-01

    Lead sulfate, lead oxides and lead metal are the main component of lead paste in spent lead acid battery. When lead sulfate was desulfurized and transformed into lead carbonate by sodium carbonate, lead metal and lead oxides remained unchanged. Lead carbonate is easily decomposed to lead oxide and carbon dioxide under high temperature. Namely, vacuum thermal process is the reduction reaction of lead oxides. A compatible environmental process consisted of hydrometallurgical desulfurization and vacuum thermal reduction to recycle lead was investigated in this research. Lead paste was firstly desulfurized with sodium carbonate, by which, the content of sulfur declined from 7.87% to 0.26%. Then, the desulfurized lead paste was reduced by charcoal under vacuum. Under the optimized reaction conditions, i.e., vacuum thermal reduction at temperature 850°C under 20 Pa for 45 min, a 22.11×10(-2) g cm(-2) min(-1) reduction rate, and a 98.13% direct recovery ratio of fine lead (99.77%) had been achieved, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Distribution, richness, quality, and thermal maturity of source rock units on the North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Bird, K.J.; Keller, M.A.; Lillis, P.G.; Magoon, L.B.

    2003-01-01

    Four source rock units on the North Slope were identified, characterized, and mapped to better understand the origin of petroleum in the area: Hue-gamma ray zone (Hue-GRZ), pebble shale unit, Kingak Shale, and Shublik Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, total organic carbon analysis, and well logs were used to map the present-day thickness, organic quantity (TOC), quality (hydrogen index, HI), and thermal maturity (Tmax) of each unit. To map these units, we screened all available geochemical data for wells in the study area and assumed that the top and bottom of the oil window occur at Tmax of ~440° and 470°C, respectively. Based on several assumptions related to carbon mass balance and regional distributions of TOC, the present-day source rock quantity and quality maps were used to determine the extent of fractional conversion of the kerogen to petroleum and to map the original organic richness prior to thermal maturation.

  20. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. UUU, Table 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur...

  1. Effects of state recovery on creep buckling under variable loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Arnold, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and elevated temperature, i.e., they can return to a softer state following periods of hardening. Such material behavior is known to strongly influence structural response under some important thermomechanical loadings, for example, that involving thermal ratchetting. The influence of dynamic and thermal recovery on the creep buckling of a column under variable loading is investigated. The column is taken as the idealized (Shanley) sandwich column. The constitutive model, unlike the commonly employed Norton creep model, incorporates a representation of both dynamic and thermal (state) recovery. The material parameters of the constitutive model are chosen to characterize Narloy Z, a representative copper alloy used in thrust nozzle liners of reusable rocket engines. Variable loading histories include rapid cyclic unloading/reloading sequences and intermittent reductions of load for extended periods of time; these are superimposed on a constant load. The calculated results show that state recovery significantly affects creep buckling under variable loading. Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and time.

  2. Design and study of water supply system for supercritical unit boiler in thermal power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zenghui

    2018-04-01

    In order to design and optimize the boiler feed water system of supercritical unit, the establishment of a highly accurate controlled object model and its dynamic characteristics are prerequisites for developing a perfect thermal control system. In this paper, the method of mechanism modeling often leads to large systematic errors. Aiming at the information contained in the historical operation data of the boiler typical thermal system, the modern intelligent identification method to establish a high-precision quantitative model is used. This method avoids the difficulties caused by the disturbance experiment modeling for the actual system in the field, and provides a strong reference for the design and optimization of the thermal automation control system in the thermal power plant.

  3. Synthesis, Structure, and Rigid Unit Mode-like Anisotropic Thermal Expansion of BaIr 2 In 9

    SciTech Connect

    Calta, Nicholas P.; Han, Fei; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-09-08

    This Article reports the synthesis of large single crystals of BaIr 2In 9 using In flux and their characterization by variable-temperature single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, resistivity, and magnetization measurements. The title compound adopts the BaFe 2Al 9-type structure in the space group P6/mmm with room temperature unit cell parameters a = 8.8548(6) angstrom and c = 4.2696(4) A. BaIr 2In 9 exhibits anisotropic thermal expansion behavior with linear expansion along the c axis more than 3 times larger than expansion in the ab plane between 90 and 400 K. This anisotropic expansion originates from a rigid unit mode-likemore » mechanism similar to the mechanism of zero and negative thermal expansion observed in many anomalous thermal expansion materials such as ZrW 2O 8 and ScF 3.« less

  4. Synthesis, Structure, and Rigid Unit Mode-like Anisotropic Thermal Expansion of BaIr2In9.

    PubMed

    Calta, Nicholas P; Han, Fei; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-09-08

    This Article reports the synthesis of large single crystals of BaIr2In9 using In flux and their characterization by variable-temperature single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, resistivity, and magnetization measurements. The title compound adopts the BaFe2Al9-type structure in the space group P6/mmm with room temperature unit cell parameters a = 8.8548(6) Å and c = 4.2696(4) Å. BaIr2In9 exhibits anisotropic thermal expansion behavior with linear expansion along the c axis more than 3 times larger than expansion in the ab plane between 90 and 400 K. This anisotropic expansion originates from a rigid unit mode-like mechanism similar to the mechanism of zero and negative thermal expansion observed in many anomalous thermal expansion materials such as ZrW2O8 and ScF3.

  5. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage: An Attempt to Counter Free Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Melville, J. G.; Güven, O.; Parr, A. D.

    1983-08-01

    In previous Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) experiments, appreciable free thermal convection was observed. In an attempt to counter the detrimental effects of convection, a dual recovery well system was constructed at the Mobile site and a third injection-storage-recovery cycle performed. Using a partially penetrating well, cycle 3-3 injection began on April 7, 1982. A total of 56,680 m3 of 79°C water were injected. After 57 days of storage, production began with a dual recovery well system. Due to the dominating effect of nonhomogeneities, the dual well system did not work particularly well, and a recovery factor of 0.42 was achieved. The degree of aquifer heterogeneity at the location of the present experiments was not apparent during previous experiments at a location only 109 m away, although pumping tests indicated similar values of transmissivity. Therefore aquifers with the same transmissivity can behave quite differently in a thermal sense. Heat conduction to the upper aquitard was a major energy loss mechanism. Water sample analyses indicated that there were no important changes in the chemical constituents during the third set of experiments. There was a 19% increase in total dissolved solids. At the end of injection, the land surface near the injection well had risen 1.39 cm with respect to bench marks located 70 m away.

  6. Implementation of a recovery-oriented model in a sub-acute Intermediate Stay Mental Health Unit (ISMHU).

    PubMed

    Frost, Barry G; Turrell, Megan; Sly, Ketrina A; Lewin, Terry J; Conrad, Agatha M; Johnston, Suzanne; Tirupati, Srinivasan; Petrovic, Kerry; Rajkumar, Sadanand

    2017-01-03

    An ongoing service evaluation project was initiated following the establishment of a new, purpose-built, 20-bed sub-acute Intermediate Stay Mental Health Unit (ISMHU). This paper: provides an overview of the targeted 6-week program, operating within an Integrated Recovery-oriented Model (IRM); characterises the clients admitted during the first 16 months; and documents their recovery needs and any changes. A brief description of the unit's establishment and programs is initially provided. Client needs and priorities were identified collaboratively using the Mental Health Recovery Star (MHRS) and addressed through a range of in-situ, individual and group interventions. Extracted client and service data were analysed using descriptive statistics, paired t-tests examining change from admission to discharge, and selected correlations. The initial 154 clients (165 admissions, average stay = 47.86 days) were predominately male (72.1%), transferred from acute care (75.3%), with schizophrenia or related disorders (74.0%). Readmission rates within 6-months were 16.2% for acute and 3.2% for sub-acute care. Three MHRS subscales were derived, together with stage-of-change categories. Marked improvements in MHRS Symptom management and functioning were identified (z-change = -1.15), followed by Social-connection (z-change = -0.82) and Self-belief (z-change = -0.76). This was accompanied by a mean reduction of 2.59 in the number of pre-action MHRS items from admission to discharge (z-change = 0.98). Clinician-rated Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) improvements were smaller (z-change = 0.41), indicative of illness chronicity. Staff valued the elements of client choice, the holistic and team approach, program quality, review processes and opportunities for client change. Addressing high-levels of need in the 6-week timeframe was raised as a concern. This paper demonstrates that a recovery-oriented model can be successfully implemented at the

  7. The EarthCARE multi spectral imager thermal infrared optical unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. P. J. L.; Woods, D.; Baister, Guy; Lobb, Dan; Wood, Trevor

    2017-11-01

    The EarthCARE satellite mission objective is the observation of clouds and aerosols from low Earth orbit. The key spatial context providing instrument within the payload suite of 4 instruments is the Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), previously described in [1]. The MSI is intended to provide information on the horizontal variability of the atmospheric conditions and to identify e.g. cloud type, textures, and temperature. It will form Earth images at 500m ground sample distance (GSD) over a swath width of 150km; it will image Earth in 7 spectral bands: one visible, one near-IR, two short-wave IR and three thermal IR. The instrument will be comprised of two key parts: • a visible-NIR-SWIR (VNS) optical unit radiometrically calibrated using a sun illuminated quasivolume diffuser and shutter system • a thermal IR (TIR) optical unit radiometrically calibrated using cold space and an internal black-body. This paper, being the first of a sequence of two, will provide an overview of the MSI and enter into more detail the critical performance parameters and detailed design the MSI TIR optical design. The TIR concept is to provide pushbroom imaging of its 3 bands through spectral separation from a common aperture. The result is an efficient, well controlled optical design without the need for multiple focal plane arrays. The designed focal plane houses an area array detector and will meet a challenging set of requirements, including radiometric resolution, accuracy, distortion and MTF.

  8. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions...

  9. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits...

  10. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions...

  11. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits...

  12. Martian Surface Compositions and Spectral Unit Mapping From the Thermal Emission Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.; Rogers, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on board the Mars Odyssey spacecraft observes Mars at nine spectral intervals between 6 and 15 microns and at 100 meter spatial sampling. This spectral and spatial resolution allows for mapping of local spectral units and coarse compositional determination of a variety of rock-forming materials such as carbonates, sulfates, and silicates. A number of data processing and atmospheric correction techniques have been developed to ease and speed the interpretation of multispectral THEMIS infrared images. These products and techniques are in the process of being made publicly available via the THEMIS website and were used to produce the results presented here. Spectral variability at kilometer scales in THEMIS data is more common in the southern highlands than in the northern lowlands. Many of the spectral units are associated with a mobile surface layer such as dune fields and mantled dust. However, a number of spectral units appear to be directly tied to the local geologic rock units. These spectral units are commonly associated with crater walls, floors, and ejecta blankets. Other surface compositions are correlated with layered volcanic materials and knobby remnant terrains. Most of the spectral variability observed to date appears to be tied to a variation in silicate mineralogy. Olivine rich units that have been previously reported in Nili Fossae, Ares Valles, and the Valles Marineris region appear to be sparse but common in a number of regions in the southern highlands. Variations in silica content consistent with previously reported global surface units also appear to be present in THEMIS images, allowing for an examination of their local geologic context. Previously reported quartz and feldspar rich exposures in northern Syrtis Major appear more extensive in the region than previously reported. A coherent global and local picture of the mineralogy of the Martian surface is emerging from THEMIS measurements along with

  13. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for...

  14. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for...

  15. Recovery and purification of ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Reyneke, Rian [Katy, TX; Foral, Michael J [Aurora, IL; Lee, Guang-Chung [Houston, TX; Eng, Wayne W. Y. [League City, TX; Sinclair, Iain [Warrington, GB; Lodgson, Jeffery S [Naperville, IL

    2008-10-21

    A process for the recovery and purification of ethylene and optionally propylene from a stream containing lighter and heavier components that employs an ethylene distributor column and a partially thermally coupled distributed distillation system.

  16. Characterizing and modeling the free recovery and constrained recovery behavior of a polyurethane shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Brent L.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, tensile tests and one-dimensional constitutive modeling were performed on a high recovery force polyurethane shape memory polymer that is being considered for biomedical applications. The tensile tests investigated the free recovery (zero load) response as well as the constrained displacement recovery (stress recovery) response at extension values up to 25%, and two consecutive cycles were performed during each test. The material was observed to recover 100% of the applied deformation when heated at zero load in the second thermomechanical cycle, and a stress recovery of 1.5-4.2 MPa was observed for the constrained displacement recovery experiments. After the experiments were performed, the Chen and Lagoudas model was used to simulate and predict the experimental results. The material properties used in the constitutive model—namely the coefficients of thermal expansion, shear moduli, and frozen volume fraction—were calibrated from a single 10% extension free recovery experiment. The model was then used to predict the material response for the remaining free recovery and constrained displacement recovery experiments. The model predictions match well with the experimental data.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analysesmore » and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.« less

  18. Increasing Maintainability of a Wastewater-Recovery Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Brose, H. F.

    1987-01-01

    Modified system leaks less and easier to disassemble for maintenance. Redesign of wastewater-recovery system separates water from urine: improved operation and system easier to maintain. Details of redesign, chiefly affected hollow-fiber-membrane evaporator, described in report.

  19. Status and ecology of Mexican spotted owls in the Upper Gila Mountains recovery unit, Arizona and New Mexico

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; James P. Ward; David W. Willey

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes current knowledge on the status and ecology of the Mexican spotted owl within the Upper Gila Mountains Recovery Unit (UGM RU). It was written at the request of U.S. Forest Service personnel involved in the Four Forests Restoration Initiative (4FRI), a collaborative, landscape-scale restoration effort covering approximately 2.4 million ac (1...

  20. Extermination and recovery of red wolf and grey wolf in the contiguous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Michael K.; Bangs, Edward E.; Mech, L. David; Kelly, Brian T.; Fazio, Buddy B.; Macdonald, David W.; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    About 150 years ago, the grey wolf (Canis lupus) was distributed throughout the contiguous United States, except for in southeastern US from central Texas to the Atlantic coast, where the red wolf (Canis rufus) occurred. Conflict with agricultural interests resulted in government-supported eradication campaigns beginning in colonial Massachusetts in 1630. Over the next 300 years, the campaigns were extended throughout the US resulting in the near extermination of both species. In recent decades, efforts to recover the red and grey wolf were carried out. This chapter summarizes extermination and recovery efforts for both species in the contiguous US.

  1. Enhanced terrestrial weathering/runoff and surface ocean carbonate production during the recovery stages of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, D. Clay; Zachos, James C.; Bralower, Timothy J.; Schellenberg, Stephen A.

    2005-12-01

    The carbonate saturation profile of the oceans shoaled markedly during a transient global warming event known as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) (circa 55 Ma). The rapid release of large quantities of carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system is believed to have triggered this intense episode of dissolution along with a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). The brevity (120-220 kyr) of the PETM reflects the rapid enhancement of negative feedback mechanisms within Earth's exogenic carbon cycle that served the dual function of buffering ocean pH and reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels. Detailed study of the PETM stratigraphy from Ocean Drilling Program Site 690 (Weddell Sea) reveals that the CIE recovery period, which postdates the CIE onset by ˜80 kyr, is represented by an expanded (˜2.5 m thick) interval containing a unique planktic foraminiferal assemblage strongly diluted by coccolithophore carbonate. Collectively, the micropaleontological and sedimentological changes preserved within the CIE recovery interval reflect a transient state when ocean-atmosphere chemistry fostered prolific coccolithophore blooms that suppressed the local lysocline to relatively deeper depths. A prominent peak in the abundance of the clay mineral kaolinite is associated with the CIE recovery interval, indicating that continental weathering/runoff intensified at this time as well (Robert and Kennett, 1994). Such parallel stratigraphic changes are generally consonant with the hypothesis that enhanced continental weathering/runoff and carbonate precipitation helped sequester carbon during the PETM recovery period (e.g., Dickens et al., 1997; Zachos et al., 2005).

  2. The thermal circuit of a nuclear power station's unit built around a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, V. A.; Zorin, V. M.; Tagirov, A. M.; Tregubova, O. I.; Belov, I. V.; Povarov, P. V.

    2010-12-01

    Main results obtained from calculations of the steam generator and thermal circuit of the steam turbine unit for a nuclear power unit with supercritical-pressure water coolant and integral layout are presented. The obtained characteristics point to the advisability of carrying out further developments of this promising nuclear power technology.

  3. 15 CFR 971.501 - Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical mining unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource assessment, recovery plan... COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Resource Development § 971.501 Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical... relation to the applicant's production requirements, operating period, and recovery efficiency in order to...

  4. 15 CFR 971.501 - Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical mining unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource assessment, recovery plan... COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Resource Development § 971.501 Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical... relation to the applicant's production requirements, operating period, and recovery efficiency in order to...

  5. 15 CFR 971.501 - Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical mining unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource assessment, recovery plan... COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Resource Development § 971.501 Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical... relation to the applicant's production requirements, operating period, and recovery efficiency in order to...

  6. 15 CFR 971.501 - Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical mining unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource assessment, recovery plan... COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Resource Development § 971.501 Resource assessment, recovery plan, and logical... relation to the applicant's production requirements, operating period, and recovery efficiency in order to...

  7. Detection theory for accurate and non-invasive skin cancer diagnosis using dynamic thermal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Hayat, Majeed M.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; Padilla, R. Steven; Krishna, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States with over 3.5M annual cases. Presently, visual inspection by a dermatologist has good sensitivity (> 90%) but poor specificity (< 10%), especially for melanoma, which leads to a high number of unnecessary biopsies. Here we use dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) to demonstrate a rapid, accurate and non-invasive imaging system for detection of skin cancer. In DTI, the lesion is cooled down and the thermal recovery is recorded using infrared imaging. The thermal recovery curves of the suspected lesions are then utilized in the context of continuous-time detection theory in order to define an optimal statistical decision rule such that the sensitivity of the algorithm is guaranteed to be at a maximum for every prescribed false-alarm probability. The proposed methodology was tested in a pilot study including 140 human subjects demonstrating a sensitivity in excess of 99% for a prescribed specificity in excess of 99% for detection of skin cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest reported accuracy for any non-invasive skin cancer diagnosis method. PMID:28736673

  8. Accelerated recovery after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mehmet; Kut, Mustafa Sinan; Yurtseven, Nurgul; Cimen, Serdar; Demirtas, Mahmut Murat

    2002-01-01

    The accelerated-recovery approach, involving early extubation, early mobility, decreased duration of intensive care unit stay, and decreased duration of hospitalization has recently become a controversial issue in cardiac surgery. We investigated timing of extubation, length of intensive care unit stay, and duration of hospitalization in 225 consecutive cardiac surgery patients. Of the 225 patients, 139 were male and 86 were female; average age was 49.73 +/- 16.95 years. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in 127 patients; 65 patients underwent aortic and/or mitral or pulmonary valvular operations; 5 patients underwent valvular plus coronary artery operations; and in 28 patients surgical interventions for congenital anomalies were carried out. The accelerated-recovery approach could be applied in 169 of the 225 cases (75.11%). Accelerated-recovery patients were extubated after an average of 3.97 +/- 1.59 hours, and the average duration of stay in the intensive care unit was 20.93 +/- 2.44 hours for these patients. Patients were discharged if they met all of the following criteria: hemodynamic stability, cooperativeness, ability to initiate walking exercises within wards, lack of pathology in laboratory investigations, and psychological readiness for discharge. Mean duration of hospitalization for accelerated-recovery patients was 4.24 +/- 0.75 days. Two patients (1.18%) who were extubated within the first 6 hours required reintubation. Four patients (2.36%) who were sent to the wards returned to intensive care unit due to various reasons and 6 (3.55%) of the discharged patients were rehospitalized. Approaches for decreasing duration of intubation, intensive care unit stay and hospitalization may be applied in elective and uncomplicated cardiac surgical interventions with short duration of aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass, without risking patients. Frequencies of reintubation, return to intensive care unit, and rehospitalization are quite

  9. Prospective observational study of delirium recovery trajectories and associated short-term outcomes in older adults admitted to a specialized delirium unit.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching-yu; Tay, Laura; Chan, Mark; Ding, Yew Yoong; Chong, Mei Sian

    2014-09-01

    To describe the recovery trajectories of delirium and to determine factors predicting the course of recovery and adverse outcome. A prospective observational study. Geriatric monitoring unit (GMU), a five-bed unit specializing in managing older adults with delirium. Individuals admitted to the GMU between December 2010 and August 2012 (N = 234; mean age 84.1 ± 7.4). Information was collected on demographic characteristics; comorbidities; severity of illness; functional status; and daily cognitive, Delirium Rating Scale, Revised-98 (DRS-R98) severity, and functional scoring. Resolution of delirium, and thus GMU discharge, was determined according to clinical assessment. The primary outcome was residual subsyndromal delirium (SSD) (DRS-R98 severity ≥13) upon GMU discharge. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to determine the predictors of residual SSD and adverse outcomes (inpatient mortality and incident nursing home admission upon discharge). Participants with residual SSD had a slower recovery in terms of delirium severity, cognition, and functional status than those with no residual SSD. Residual SSD predictors included underlying dementia, admission DRS-R98 severity, DRS-R98 severity on Day 1 minus Day 3 of GMU stay, and admission modified Barthel Index. Only presence of residual SSD at discharge predicted adverse outcomes (odds ratio = 5.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.43-19.47). Individuals with residual SSD had prolonged recovery trajectory of delirium. These new insights into the recovery trajectories of delirium may help formulate early discharge planning and provide the basis for future research on delirium treatment. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. A basic study on Thermosyphon-type thermal storage unit (TSU) using Nanofluid as the heat transfer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang-Fei; Wang, Ping-Yang; Liu, Zhen-hua

    2018-05-01

    This study proposed a novel thermosyphon-type thermal storage unit using water-based CuO nanofluid as the phase-change heat transfer medium. Seven tubular canisters containing solid-liquid phase-change material (PCM) with peak melting temperature of 100 °C were placed vertically into the center of the TSU which is a vertical cylindrical vessel made of stainless steel. Coat formed by depositing nanoparticles during the phase-change process was adopted to increase the wettability of the heat transfer surfaces of the canisters. We investigated the phase-change heat transfer, as well as the heat-storage and heat-release properties, of the TSU through experimental and computational analysis. Our results demonstrate that this thermal storage unit construction can propose good heat transfer and heat-storage/heat-release performance. The coating of nanoparticles onto the heat transfer surfaces increases the surface wettability and improves both the evaporation and condensation heat transfer. The main thermal resistance in the TSU results from the conductive heat transfer inside of the PCM. All phase-change thermal resistance of liquid film in charging and discharging processes can be ignored in this TSU.

  11. Understanding the Factors that Influence Perceptions of Post-Wildfire Landscape Recovery Across 25 Wildfires in the Northwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, C; Hall, T E; Paveglio, T; Pickering, M

    2018-01-01

    Disturbances such as wildfire are important features of forested landscapes. The trajectory of changes following wildfires (often referred to as landscape recovery) continues to be an important research topic among ecologists and wildfire scientists. However, the landscape recovery process also has important social dimensions that may or may not correspond to ecological or biophysical perspectives. Perceptions of landscape recovery may affect people's attitudes and behaviors related to forest and wildfire management. We explored the variables that influence people's perceptions of landscape recovery across 25 fires that occurred in 2011 or 2012 in the United States of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana and that represented a range of fire behavior characteristics and landscape impacts. Residents near each of the 25 fires were randomly selected to receive questionnaires about their experiences with the nearby fire, including perceived impacts and how the landscape had recovered since the fire. People generally perceived landscapes as recovering, even though only one to two years had passed. Regression analysis suggested that perceptions of landscape recovery were positively related to stronger beliefs about the ecological role of fire and negatively related to loss of landscape attachment, concern about erosion, increasing distance from the fire perimeter, and longer lasting fires. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis indicated that the above relationships were largely consistent across fires. These findings highlight that perceptions of post-fire landscape recovery are influenced by more than vegetation changes and include emotional and cognitive factors. We discuss the management implications of these findings.

  12. Understanding the Factors that Influence Perceptions of Post-Wildfire Landscape Recovery Across 25 Wildfires in the Northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, C.; Hall, T. E.; Paveglio, T.; Pickering, M.

    2018-01-01

    Disturbances such as wildfire are important features of forested landscapes. The trajectory of changes following wildfires (often referred to as landscape recovery) continues to be an important research topic among ecologists and wildfire scientists. However, the landscape recovery process also has important social dimensions that may or may not correspond to ecological or biophysical perspectives. Perceptions of landscape recovery may affect people's attitudes and behaviors related to forest and wildfire management. We explored the variables that influence people's perceptions of landscape recovery across 25 fires that occurred in 2011 or 2012 in the United States of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana and that represented a range of fire behavior characteristics and landscape impacts. Residents near each of the 25 fires were randomly selected to receive questionnaires about their experiences with the nearby fire, including perceived impacts and how the landscape had recovered since the fire. People generally perceived landscapes as recovering, even though only one to two years had passed. Regression analysis suggested that perceptions of landscape recovery were positively related to stronger beliefs about the ecological role of fire and negatively related to loss of landscape attachment, concern about erosion, increasing distance from the fire perimeter, and longer lasting fires. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis indicated that the above relationships were largely consistent across fires. These findings highlight that perceptions of post-fire landscape recovery are influenced by more than vegetation changes and include emotional and cognitive factors. We discuss the management implications of these findings.

  13. Characterizing and modeling the free recovery and constrained recovery behavior of a polyurethane shape memory polymer

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Brent L; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Maitland, Duncan J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, tensile tests and one-dimensional constitutive modeling are performed on a high recovery force polyurethane shape memory polymer that is being considered for biomedical applications. The tensile tests investigate the free recovery (zero load) response as well as the constrained displacement recovery (stress recovery) response at extension values up to 25%, and two consecutive cycles are performed during each test. The material is observed to recover 100% of the applied deformation when heated at zero load in the second thermomechanical cycle, and a stress recovery of 1.5 MPa to 4.2 MPa is observed for the constrained displacement recovery experiments. After performing the experiments, the Chen and Lagoudas model is used to simulate and predict the experimental results. The material properties used in the constitutive model – namely the coefficients of thermal expansion, shear moduli, and frozen volume fraction – are calibrated from a single 10% extension free recovery experiment. The model is then used to predict the material response for the remaining free recovery and constrained displacement recovery experiments. The model predictions match well with the experimental data. PMID:22003272

  14. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  15. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery, phases 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honegger, R. J.; Remus, G. A.; Krug, E. K.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported on the development of an evaporator for vacuum distillation/vapor filtration VD/VF water reclamation system for use on manned space flights. The design, fabrication, and tests of a six-man evaporator are described. It is concluded that: (1) A condenser with an internal rotating impeller and coolant surfaces directly opposite the condensing surfaces is an effective condenser. (2) The VD/VF evaporator, catalyst unit and condenser function satisfactorily based on thermal, mechanical and recovery performance during a 145-hour evaluation test. (3) The quality of recovered water, as measured by analyses for total organic carbon, pH, conductivity, turbidity, and viable bacteria density was within established limits for potability.

  16. Parallel Fin ORU Thermal Interface for space applications. [Orbital Replaceable Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobb, C. A.; Limardo, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    The Parallel Fin Thermal Interface has been developed as an Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) interface. The interface transfers heat from an ORU baseplate to a Heat Acquisition Plate (HAP) through pairs of fins sandwiched between insert plates that press against the fins with uniform pressure. The insert plates are spread apart for ORU baseplate separation and replacement. Two prototype interfaces with different fin dimensions were built (Model 140 and 380). Interfacing surface samples were found to have roughnesses of 56 to 89 nm. Conductance values of 267 to 420 W/sq m C were obtained for the 140 model in vacuum with interface pressures of 131 to 262 kPa (19 to 38 psi). Vacuum conductances ranging from 176 to 267 W/sq m F were obtained for the 380 model at interface pressures of 97 to 152 kPa (14 and 22 psi). Correlations from several sources were found to agree with test data within 20 percent using thermal math models of the interfaces.

  17. Battery thermal management unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicholas A.

    1989-03-01

    A battery warming device has been designed which uses waste heat from an operating internal combustion engine to warm a battery. A portion of the waste heat is stored in the sensible and latent heat of a phase change type material for use in maintaining the battery temperature after the engine is shut off. The basic design of the device consists of a Phase Change Material (PCM) reservoir and a simple heat exchanger connected to the engineer's cooling system. Two types of units were built, tested and field trialed. A strap-on type which was strapped to the side of an automotive battery and was intended for the automotive after-market and a tray type on which a battery or batteries sat. This unit was intended for the heavy duty truck market. It was determined that both types of units increased the average cranking power of the batteries they were applied to. Although there were several design problems with the units such as the need for an automatic thermostatically controlled bypass valve, the overall feeling is that there is a market opportunity for both the strap-on and tray type battery warming units.

  18. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE PAGES

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; ...

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  19. The effect of two kinds of T-shirts on physiological and psychological thermal responses during exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Brazaitis, Marius; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological responses during and after high-intensity exercise in a warm and humid environment in subjects wearing shirts of different fabrics. Eight healthy men exercised on two separate occasions, in random order, wearing two types of long-sleeve T-shirt: one made of polyester (PES) and the other of cotton fabric (CT). They performed three 20 min exercise bouts, with 5 min rest between each, and then rested in a chair for 60 min to recover. The ambient temperature was 25 °C and relative humidity was 60%. The exercise comprised of treadmill running at 8 km/h at 1° grade. Rectal temperature, skin temperatures at eight sites, heart rate, T-shirt mass and ratings of thermal, clothing wettedness, and shivering/sweating sensation were measured before the experiment, during the 5 min rest period after each exercise bout, and during recovery. Nude body mass was measured before the experiment and during recovery. The physiological stress index showed that the exercise produced a state of very high heat stress. Compared with exercise wearing the CT shirt, exercise wearing the PES fabric produced a greater sweating efficiency and less clothing regain (i.e., less sweat retention), but thermophysiological and subjective sensations during the intermittent high-intensity exercise were similar for both fabrics. However, skin temperature returned to the pre-exercise level faster, and the thermal and rating of shivering/sweating sensation were lower after exercise in the warm and humid environment in subjects wearing PES than when wearing the more traditional CT fabric. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.

    2012-05-07

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of themore » open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.« less

  1. Successful short-term cryopreservation of volume-reduced cord blood units in a cryogenic mechanical freezer: effects on cell recovery, viability, and clonogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Anagnostakis, Ioannis; Papassavas, Andreas C; Michalopoulos, Efstathios; Chatzistamatiou, Theofanis; Andriopoulou, Sofia; Tsakris, Athanassios; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) units are stored from weeks to years in liquid- or vapor-phase nitrogen until they are used for transplantation. We examined the effects of cryostorage in a mechanical freezer at -150°C on critical quality control variables of CB collections to investigate the possible use of mechanical freezers at -150°C as an alternative to storage in liquid- (or vapor-) phase nitrogen. A total of 105 CB units were thawed and washed at different time intervals (6, 12, 24, and 36 months). For every thawed CB unit, samples were removed and cell enumeration (total nucleated cells [TNCs], mononuclear cells [MNCs], CD34+, CD133+) was performed. In addition, viability was obtained with the use of flow cytometry, and recoveries were calculated. Also, total absolute colony-forming unit counts were performed and progenitor cell recoveries were studied by clonogenic assays. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed in certain variables (TNCs, MNC numbers, viability) when they were examined in relation with time intervals, while others (CD34+, CD133+) were relatively insensitive (p = NS) to the duration of time interval the CB units were kept in cryostorage condition. The data presented suggest that cryopreservation of CB units in a mechanical freezer at -150°C may represent an alternative cryostorage condition for CB cryopreservation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. A hybrid regenerative water recovery system for lunar/Mars life support applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Edeen, Marybeth A.; Packham, Nigel J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Long-duration manned space missions will require integrated biological and physicochemical processes for recovery of resources from wastes. This paper discusses a hybrid regenerative biological and physicochemical water recovery system designed and built at NASA's Crew and Thermal Systems Division at Johnson Space Center. The system is sized for a four-person crew and consists of a two-stage, aerobic, trickling filter bioreactor; a reverse osmosis system; and a photocatalytic oxidation system. The system was designed to accommodate high organic and inorganic loadings and a low hydraulic loading. The bioreactor was designed to oxidize organics to carbon dioxide and water; the reverse osmosis system reduces inorganic content to potable quality; and the photocatalytic oxidation unit removes residual organic impurities (part per million range) and provides in situ disinfection. The design and performance of the hybrid system for producing potable/hygiene water is described. Aspects of the system such as closure, automation and integration are discussed and preliminary results presented.

  3. The Effects of Mechanical and Thermal Stimuli on Local Field Potentials and Single Unit Activity in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Belasen, Abigail; Youn, Youngwon; Gee, Lucy; Prusik, Julia; Lai, Brant; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Rizvi, Khizer; Yeung, Philip; Shin, Damian S; Argoff, Charles; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pain is a major, debilitating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to improve pain outcomes, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear. Microelectrode recording allows us to measure both local field potentials (LFPs) and single neuronal unit activity (SUA). In this study, we examined how single unit and LFP oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia are impacted by mechanical and thermal sensory stimuli and explored their role in pain modulation. We assessed changes in LFPs and SUAs in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus interna (Gpi), and globus pallidus externa (Gpe) following exposure with mechanical or thermal stimuli. Sensory thresholds were determined pre-operatively using quantitative sensory testing. Based on these data, patients were exposed to innocuous and noxious mechanical, pressure, and thermal stimuli at individualized thresholds. In the STN, LFP alpha oscillatory activity and SUA increased in response to innocuous mechanical stimuli; SUA further increased in response to noxious mechanical, noxious pressure, and noxious thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). In the Gpe, LFP low betaactivity and SUA increased with noxious thermal stimuli; SUA also increased in response to innocuous thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). In the Gpi, innocuous thermal stimuli increased LFP gammaactivity; noxious pressure stimuli decreased low betaactivity; SUA increased in response to noxious thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate that mechanical and thermal stimuli alter basal ganglia LFPs and SUAs in PD. While STN SUA increases nearly uniformly to all sensory stimuli, SUA in the pallidal nuclei respond solely to thermal stimuli. Similarly, thermal stimuli yield increases in pallidal LFP activity, but not STN activity. We speculate that DBS may provide analgesia through suppression of stimuli-specific changes in basal ganglia activity, supporting a role for these nuclei

  4. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  5. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Thermal Power Model in Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Fabanich, William A.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal power model that was built using the Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit (EU) test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's Ideas TMG thermal model. ASRG performance under (1) ASC hot-end temperatures, (2) ambient temperatures, and (3) years of mission for the general purpose heat source fuel decay was predicted using this model for the flight unit. The results were compared with those reported by Lockheed Martin and showed good agreement. In addition, the model was used to study the performance of the ASRG flight unit for operations on the ground and on the surface of Titan, and the concept of using gold film to reduce thermal loss through insulation was investigated.

  6. Thermal, creep-recovery and viscoelastic behavior of high density polyethylene/hydroxyapatite nano particles for bone substitutes: effects of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Othman Y; Fouad, H; Al-Zahrani, S M; Eshra, Ayman; Al Rez, Mohammed Fayez; Ansari, S G

    2014-08-28

    High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) is one of the most often used polymers in biomedical applications. The limitations of HDPE are its visco-elastic behavior, low modulus and poor bioactivity. To improve HDPE properties, HA nanoparticles can be added to form polymer composite that can be used as alternatives to metals for bone substitutes and orthopaedic implant applications. In our previous work (BioMedical Engineering OnLine 2013), different ratios of HDPE/HA nanocomposites were prepared using melt blending in a co-rotating intermeshing twin screw extruder. The accelerated aging effects on the tensile properties and torsional viscoelastic behavior (storage modulus (G') and Loss modulus (G")) at 80°C of irradiated and non-irradiated HDPE/HA was investigated. Also the thermal behavior of HDPE/HA were studied. In this study, the effects of gamma irradiation on the tensile viscoelastic behavior (storage modulus (E') and Loss modulus (E")) at 25°C examined for HDPE/HA nanocomposites at different frequencies using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The DMA was also used to analyze creep-recovery and relaxation properties of the nanocomposites. To analyze the thermal behavior of the HDPE/HA nanocomposite, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used. The microscopic examination of the cryogenically fractured surface revealed a reasonable distribution of HA nanoparticles in the HDPE matrix. The DMA showed that the tensile storage and loss modulus increases with increasing the HA nanoparticles ratio and the test frequency. The creep-recovery behavior improves with increasing the HA nanoparticle content. Finally, the results indicated that the crystallinity, viscoelastic, creep recovery and relaxation behavior of HDPE nanocomposite improved due to gamma irradiation. Based on the experimental results, it is found that prepared HDPE nanocomposite properties improved due to the addition of HA nanoparticles and irradiation. So, the prepared HDPE/HA nanocomposite appears to

  7. Serious infection risk and immune recovery after double-unit cord blood transplantation without antithymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Craig; Abboud, Michelle; Jia, Xiaoyu; Heller, Glenn; Gonzales, Anne-Marie; Lubin, Marissa; Hawke, Rebecca; Perales, Miguel-Angel; van den Brink, Marcel R; Giralt, Sergio; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Small, Trudy N; Barker, Juliet N

    2011-10-01

    Factors contributing to infection risk after cord blood transplantation (CBT) include the use of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), prolonged neutropenia, and failure to transfer immunity. In the present study, we investigated the potential of double-unit CBT without ATG to reduce the risk of infection and evaluated the nature of serious infections in the first year after CBT using this approach. Seventy-two predominantly adult patients underwent CBT for hematologic malignancies; of these, 52 patients received myeloablative conditioning, and 20 received nonmyeloablative conditioning. The peak incidences of bacterial infections (32%), fungal infections (14%), and bacterial/fungal pneumonias (10%) occurred in the first 30 days posttransplantation. Three such infections contributed to early mortality. The peak incidence of viral infections was 31-60 days posttransplantation, affecting 30% of patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was the most common viral infection. CMV infections occurring before day 120 (n = 23) had no relationship with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), whereas CMV infections occurring after day 120 (n = 5), along with all cases of Epstein-Barr virus viremia (n = 5) and adenoviral enteritis (n = 2), occurred exclusively in the context of GVHD therapy or corticosteroid use for another indication. Viral infections had the highest lethality: 2 were a direct cause of death, and 3 contributed to death. Patients exhibited steady immune recovery, achieving a median CD3(+)4(+) T cell count >200 cells/μL by day 120 post-CBT, and no infection-related deaths occurred after day 120. Our results suggest that double-unit CBT without ATG is associated with prompt T cell recovery, and, unlike in CBT incorporating ATG, infection is rarely a primary cause of death. However, CBT without ATG is associated with a significant risk of GVHD, and serious infections remain a challenge, especially in the setting of GVHD. New strategies are needed to further reduce infectious

  8. DUCKS: Low cost thermal monitoring units for near-vent deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew; Pirie, Dawn; Horton, Keith; Garbeil, Harold; Pilger, Eric; Ramm, Hans; Hoblitt, Rick; Thornber, Carl; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-05-01

    During 1999 we designed and tested a thermal monitoring system to provide a cheap, robust, modular, real-time system capable of surviving the hostile conditions encountered proximal to active volcanic vents. In November 2000 the first system was deployed at Pu'u 'O'o (Kilauea, Hawai'i) to target persistently active vents. Aside from some minor problems, such as sensor damage due to tampering, this system remained operational until January 2004. The success of the prototype system led us to use the blueprint for a second installation at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). This was deployed, dug into a bomb-proof bunker, during May 2002 and survived the April 2003 paroxysmal eruption despite being located just 250 m from the vent. In both cases, careful waterproofing of connectors and selection of suitable protection has prevented water damage and corrosion in the harsh atmosphere encountered at the crater rim. The Pu'u 'O'o system cost ˜US10,000 and comprises four modules: sensors, transmission and power hub, repeater station and reception site. The sensor component consists of three thermal infrared thermometers housed in Pelican™ cases fitted with Germanium-Arsenide-Selenium windows. Two 1° field of view (FOV) sensors allow specific vents to be targeted and a 60° FOV sensor provides a crater floor overview. A hard wire connection links to a Pelican™-case-housed microprocessor, modem and power module. From here data are transmitted, via a repeater site, to a dedicated PC at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here data are displayed with a delay of ˜3 s between acquisition and display. The modular design allows for great flexibility. At Stromboli, 1° and 15° FOV sensor modules can be switched depending changes in activity style and crater geometry. In addition a direct line of site to the Stromboli reception center negates the repeater site requirement, reducing the cost to US5500 for a single sensor system. We have also constructed self-contained units

  9. DUCKS: Low cost thermal monitoring units for near-vent deployment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, A.; Pirie, D.; Horton, K.; Garbeil, H.; Pilger, E.; Ramm, H.; Hoblitt, R.; Thornber, C.; Ripepe, M.; Marchetti, E.; Poggi, P.

    2005-01-01

    During 1999 we designed and tested a thermal monitoring system to provide a cheap, robust, modular, real-time system capable of surviving the hostile conditions encountered proximal to active volcanic vents. In November 2000 the first system was deployed at Pu'u 'O'o (Kilauea, Hawai'i) to target persistently active vents. Aside from some minor problems, such as sensor damage due to tampering, this system remained operational until January 2004. The success of the prototype system led us to use the blueprint for a second installation at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). This was deployed, dug into a bomb-proof bunker, during May 2002 and survived the April 2003 paroxysmal eruption despite being located just 250 m from the vent. In both cases, careful waterproofing of connectors and selection of suitable protection has prevented water damage and corrosion in the harsh atmosphere encountered at the crater rim. The Pu'u 'O'o system cost ???US$10,000 and comprises four modules: sensors, transmission and power hub, repeater station and reception site. The sensor component consists of three thermal infrared thermometers housed in Pelican??? cases fitted with Germanium-Arsenide-Selenium windows. Two 1?? field of view (FOV) sensors allow specific vents to be targeted and a 60?? FOV sensor provides a crater floor overview. A hard wire connection links to a Pelican???-case-housed microprocessor, modem and power module. From here data are transmitted, via a repeater site, to a dedicated PC at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here data are displayed with a delay of ???3 s between acquisition and display. The modular design allows for great flexibility. At Stromboli, 1?? and 15?? FOV sensor modules can be switched depending changes in activity style and crater geometry. In addition a direct line of site to the Stromboli reception center negates the repeater site requirement, reducing the cost to US$5500 for a single sensor system. We have also constructed self-contained units

  10. One-Unit versus Two-Unit Cord-Blood Transplantation for Hematologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, John E.; Eapen, Mary; Carter, Shelly; Wang, Yanli; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wall, Donna A.; Bunin, Nancy; Delaney, Colleen; Haut, Paul; Margolis, David; Peres, Edward; Verneris, Michael R.; Walters, Mark; Horowitz, Mary M.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Umbilical-cord blood has been used as the source of hematopoietic stem cells in an estimated 30,000 transplants. The limited number of hematopoietic cells in a single cord-blood unit prevents its use in recipients with larger body mass and results in delayed hematopoietic recovery and higher mortality. Therefore, we hypothesized that the greater numbers of hematopoietic cells in two units of cord blood would be associated with improved outcomes after transplantation. METHODS Between December 1, 2006, and February 24, 2012, a total of 224 patients 1 to 21 years of age with hematologic cancer were randomly assigned to undergo double-unit (111 patients) or single-unit (113 patients) cord-blood transplantation after a uniform myeloablative conditioning regimen and immunoprophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The primary end point was 1-year overall survival. RESULTS Treatment groups were matched for age, sex, self-reported race (white vs. nonwhite), performance status, degree of donor–recipient HLA matching, and disease type and status at transplantation. The 1-year overall survival rate was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 56 to 74) and 73% (95% CI, 63 to 80) among recipients of double and single cord-blood units, respectively (P = 0.17). Similar outcomes in the two groups were also observed with respect to the rates of disease-free survival, neutrophil recovery, transplantation-related death, relapse, infections, immunologic reconstitution, and grade II–IV acute GVHD. However, improved platelet recovery and lower incidences of grade III and IV acute and extensive chronic GVHD were observed among recipients of a single cord-blood unit. CONCLUSIONS We found that among children and adolescents with hematologic cancer, survival rates were similar after single-unit and double-unit cord-blood transplantation; however, a single-unit cord-blood transplant was associated with better platelet recovery and a lower risk of GVHD. PMID:25354103

  11. Experience gained at the Ural Turbine Works with retrofitting steam turbine units for thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Gol'dberg, A. A.; Shibaev, T. L.; Paneque Aguilera, H. C.

    2013-08-01

    Examples of projects on retrofitting, modernizing, and renovating steam turbine units at thermal power stations implemented with participation of the Ural Turbine Works are given. Advanced construction and layout solutions were used in implementing these projects both on the territory of Russia and abroad.

  12. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, togethermore » with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.« less

  13. Startup of Pumping Units in Process Water Supplies with Cooling Towers at Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, V. V., E-mail: vberlin@rinet.ru; Murav’ev, O. A., E-mail: muraviov1954@mail.ru; Golubev, A. V., E-mail: electronik@inbox.ru

    Aspects of the startup of pumping units in the cooling and process water supply systems for thermal and nuclear power plants with cooling towers, the startup stages, and the limits imposed on the extreme parameters during transients are discussed.

  14. Variation in Thermal Sensitivity and Thermal Tolerances in an Invasive Species across a Climatic Gradient: Lessons from the Land Snail Cornu aspersum

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Belén Arias, María; Lardies, Marco A.; Nespolo, Roberto F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of organisms to perform at different temperatures could be described by a continuous nonlinear reaction norm (i.e., thermal performance curve, TPC), in which the phenotypic trait value varies as a function of temperature. Almost any shift in the parameters of this performance curve could highlight the direct effect of temperature on organism fitness, providing a powerful framework for testing thermal adaptation hypotheses. Inter-and intraspecific differences in this performance curve are also reflected in thermal tolerances limits (e.g., critical and lethal limits), influencing the biogeographic patterns of species’ distribution. Within this context, here we investigated the intraspecific variation in thermal sensitivities and thermal tolerances in three populations of the invasive snail Cornu aspersum across a geographical gradient, characterized by different climatic conditions. Thus, we examined population differentiation in the TPCs, thermal-coma recovery times, expression of heat-shock proteins and standard metabolic rate (i.e., energetic costs of physiological differentiation). We tested two competing hypotheses regarding thermal adaptation (the “hotter is better” and the generalist-specialist trade-offs). Our results show that the differences in thermal sensitivity among populations of C. aspersum follow a latitudinal pattern, which is likely the result of a combination of thermodynamic constraints (“hotter is better”) and thermal adaptations to their local environments (generalist-specialist trade-offs). This finding is also consistent with some thermal tolerance indices such as the Heat-Shock Protein Response and the recovery time from chill-coma. However, mixed responses in the evaluated traits suggest that thermal adaptation in this species is not complete, as we were not able to detect any differences in neither energetic costs of physiological differentiation among populations, nor in the heat-coma recovery. PMID:23940617

  15. Variation in thermal sensitivity and thermal tolerances in an invasive species across a climatic gradient: lessons from the land snail Cornu aspersum.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Belén Arias, María; Lardies, Marco A; Nespolo, Roberto F

    2013-01-01

    The ability of organisms to perform at different temperatures could be described by a continuous nonlinear reaction norm (i.e., thermal performance curve, TPC), in which the phenotypic trait value varies as a function of temperature. Almost any shift in the parameters of this performance curve could highlight the direct effect of temperature on organism fitness, providing a powerful framework for testing thermal adaptation hypotheses. Inter-and intraspecific differences in this performance curve are also reflected in thermal tolerances limits (e.g., critical and lethal limits), influencing the biogeographic patterns of species' distribution. Within this context, here we investigated the intraspecific variation in thermal sensitivities and thermal tolerances in three populations of the invasive snail Cornu aspersum across a geographical gradient, characterized by different climatic conditions. Thus, we examined population differentiation in the TPCs, thermal-coma recovery times, expression of heat-shock proteins and standard metabolic rate (i.e., energetic costs of physiological differentiation). We tested two competing hypotheses regarding thermal adaptation (the "hotter is better" and the generalist-specialist trade-offs). Our results show that the differences in thermal sensitivity among populations of C. aspersum follow a latitudinal pattern, which is likely the result of a combination of thermodynamic constraints ("hotter is better") and thermal adaptations to their local environments (generalist-specialist trade-offs). This finding is also consistent with some thermal tolerance indices such as the Heat-Shock Protein Response and the recovery time from chill-coma. However, mixed responses in the evaluated traits suggest that thermal adaptation in this species is not complete, as we were not able to detect any differences in neither energetic costs of physiological differentiation among populations, nor in the heat-coma recovery.

  16. Shifting foundations and metrics for golden-cheeked warbler recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, Jeff S.; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Duarte, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Using the golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia) as a case study, this paper discusses what lessons can be learned from the process of the emergency listing and subsequent development of the recovery plan. Are the metrics for recovery in the current warbler plan appropriate, including population size and distribution (recovery units), migration corridors, and wintering habitat? In other words, what happened, what can we learn, and what should happen (in general) in the future for development of such plans? We discuss the number of recovery units required for species persistence and estimate the number of male warblers in protected areas across the breeding range of the species, using newly published density estimates. We also discuss future monitoring strategies to estimate warbler population trends and dispersal rates.

  17. SI Units to be Used in Place of Imperial Units and Old Metric Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Teachers Journal, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A table lists the following quantities in imperial units, old metric units, and SI units: mass, force, energy, torque, power, pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, frequency, dynamic viscosity, and kinematic viscosity. (MLH)

  18. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond. PMID:25974383

  19. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-18

    ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration

  20. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  1. One-unit versus two-unit cord-blood transplantation for hematologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John E; Eapen, Mary; Carter, Shelly; Wang, Yanli; Schultz, Kirk R; Wall, Donna A; Bunin, Nancy; Delaney, Colleen; Haut, Paul; Margolis, David; Peres, Edward; Verneris, Michael R; Walters, Mark; Horowitz, Mary M; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2014-10-30

    Umbilical-cord blood has been used as the source of hematopoietic stem cells in an estimated 30,000 transplants. The limited number of hematopoietic cells in a single cord-blood unit prevents its use in recipients with larger body mass and results in delayed hematopoietic recovery and higher mortality. Therefore, we hypothesized that the greater numbers of hematopoietic cells in two units of cord blood would be associated with improved outcomes after transplantation. Between December 1, 2006, and February 24, 2012, a total of 224 patients 1 to 21 years of age with hematologic cancer were randomly assigned to undergo double-unit (111 patients) or single-unit (113 patients) cord-blood transplantation after a uniform myeloablative conditioning regimen and immunoprophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The primary end point was 1-year overall survival. Treatment groups were matched for age, sex, self-reported race (white vs. nonwhite), performance status, degree of donor-recipient HLA matching, and disease type and status at transplantation. The 1-year overall survival rate was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 56 to 74) and 73% (95% CI, 63 to 80) among recipients of double and single cord-blood units, respectively (P=0.17). Similar outcomes in the two groups were also observed with respect to the rates of disease-free survival, neutrophil recovery, transplantation-related death, relapse, infections, immunologic reconstitution, and grade II-IV acute GVHD. However, improved platelet recovery and lower incidences of grade III and IV acute and extensive chronic GVHD were observed among recipients of a single cord-blood unit. We found that among children and adolescents with hematologic cancer, survival rates were similar after single-unit and double-unit cord-blood transplantation; however, a single-unit cord-blood transplant was associated with better platelet recovery and a lower risk of GVHD. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the

  2. Impact of length of cryopreservation and origin of cord blood units on hematologic recovery following cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurita, N; Frassoni, F; Chiba, S; Podestà, M

    2015-06-01

    As the history of the cord blood banking system has lengthened, the number of cord blood units (CBUs) cryopreserved for years has increased. The global expansion of cord blood banking resulted in active international exchange of CBUs. To determine whether long-term cryopreservation and international shipment of CBUs affect the quality of the units and outcome after transplantation, we retrospectively analyzed the quality of 95 CBUs and the hematologic recovery of 127 patients with hematological malignancy following single-unit cord blood transplantation. Of the 127 CBUs used to transplant, 42 units were cryopreserved for long periods (5-11.8 years), and 44 units were shipped from distant countries. We found that length of cryopreservation and origin of CBUs did not affect the ratio of viable total-nucleated cells after thawing. Also, neutrophil engraftment was not affected by long-term cryopreservation (> 5 years) or origin (from distant countries), (hazard ratio, 0.91 and 1.2; P=0.65 and 0.41; respectively). The number of CD34(+) cells before freezing (> 1.4 cells/kg recipient) was the only factor that enhanced neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.8; P<0.01). This suggests that length of cryopreservation and origin need not be prioritized over the CD34(+) cell dose when selecting CBUs.

  3. 40 CFR Table 32 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Requirements for Performance Tests for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standards for Sulfur Oxides 32 Table 32 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED)...

  4. Can supine recovery mitigate the exercise intensity dependent attenuation of post-exercise heat loss responses?

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; McInnis, Natalie H; Journeay, W Shane; Reardon, Francis D

    2008-08-01

    Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate are subject to non-thermal baroreflex-mediated attenuation post-exercise. Various recovery modalities have been effective in attenuating these decreases in CVC and sweat rate post-exercise. However, the interaction of recovery posture and preceding exercise intensity on post-exercise thermoregulation remains unresolved. We evaluated the combined effect of supine recovery and exercise intensity on post-exercise cardiovascular and thermal responses relative to an upright seated posture. Seven females performed 15 min of cycling ergometry at low- (LIE, 55% maximal oxygen consumption) or high-(HIE, 85% maximal oxygen consumption) intensity followed by 60 min of recovery in either an upright seated or supine posture. Esophageal temperature, CVC, sweat rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, total peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured at baseline, at end-exercise, and at 2, 5, 12, 20, and every 10 min thereafter until the end of recovery. MAP and stroke volume were maintained during supine recovery to a greater extent relative to an upright seated recovery following HIE (p recovery (p recovery following LIE, no differences were observed for MAP, CVC, sweat rate or esophageal temperature. Supine recovery attenuates the post-exercise reductions in MAP, CVC, and sweat rate in a manner dependent directly on exercise intensity. This effect is likely attributable to a non-thermal baroreceptor mechanism.

  5. [Copper recovery from artificial bioleaching lixivium of waste printed circuit boards].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dan; Zhu, Neng-Wu; Wu, Ping-Xiao; Zou, Ding-Hui; Xing, Yi-Jia

    2014-04-01

    The key step to realize metal recovery from bioleaching solutions is the recovery of copper from bioleaching lixivium of waste printed circuit boards in high-grade form. The influences of cathode material, current density, initial pH and initial copper ion concentration on the efficiency and energy consumption of copper recovery from artificial bioleaching lixivium under condition of constant current were investigated using an electro-deposition approach. The results showed that the larger specific surface area of the cathode material (carbon felt) led to the higher copper recovery efficiency (the recovery efficiencies of the anode and the cathode chambers were 96.56% and 99.25%, respectively) and the smaller the total and unit mass product energy consumption (the total and unit mass product energy consumptions were 0.022 kW x h and 15.71 kW x h x kg(-1), respectively). The copper recovery efficiency and energy consumption increased with the increase of current density. When the current density was 155.56 mA x cm(-2), the highest copper recovery efficiencies in the anode and cathode chambers reached 98.51% and 99.37%, respectively. Accordingly, the highest total and unit mass product energy consumptions were 0.037 kW x h and 24.34 kW x h x kg(-1), respectively. The copper recovery efficiency was also significantly affected by the initial copper ion concentration. The increase of the initial copper ion concentration would lead to faster decrease of copper ion concentration, higher total energy consumption, and lower unit mass product consumption. However, the initial pH had no significant effect on the copper recovery efficiency. Under the optimal conditions (carbon felt for cathode materials, current density of 111.11 mA x cm(-2), initial pH of 2.0, and initial copper ion concentration of 10 g x L(-1)), the copper recovery efficiencies of the anode and cathode chambers were 96.75% and 99.35%, and the total and unit mass product energy consumptions were 0.021 kW x h

  6. Design and field demonstration of a low-NOx burner for TEOR (thermally enhanced oil recovery) steamers

    SciTech Connect

    England, G.C.; Kwan, Y.; Payne, R.

    1984-10-01

    The paper discusses a program that addresses the need for advanced NOx control technology for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) steam generators. A full-scale (60 million Btu/hr) burner system has been developed and tested, the concept for which was based on fundamental studies. Test results are included for full-scale burner performance in an experimental test furnace, and in a field-operating steam generator which was subsequently retrofitted in a Kern County, California, oilfield. (NOTE: NOx control techniques including low-NOx burners, postflame NH/sub 3/ injection, or other postflame treatment methods--e.g., selective catalytic reduction--have been considered in order to comply with regulations. Themore » level of NOx control required to meet both growth and air quality goals has typically been difficult to achieve with available technology while maintaining acceptable CO and particulate emissions as well as practical flame conditions within the steamer.)« less

  7. Cold water immersion recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Pointon, Monique; Duffield, Rob; Cannon, Jack; Marino, Frank E

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) on recovery of neuromuscular function following simulated team-sport exercise in the heat. Ten male team-sport athletes performed two sessions of a 2 × 30-min intermittent-sprint exercise (ISE) in 32°C and 52% humidity, followed by a 20-min CWI intervention or passive recovery (CONT) in a randomized, crossover design. The ISE involved a 15-m sprint every minute separated by bouts of hard running, jogging and walking. Voluntary and evoked neuromuscular function, ratings of perceived muscle soreness (MS) and blood markers for muscle damage were measured pre- and post-exercise, immediately post-recovery, 2-h and 24-h post-recovery. Measures of core temperature (Tcore), heart rate (HR), capillary blood and perceptions of exertion, thermal strain and thirst were also recorded at the aforementioned time points. Post-exercise maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and activation (VA) were reduced in both conditions and remained below pre-exercise values for the 24-h recovery (P < 0.05). Increased blood markers of muscle damage were observed post-exercise in both conditions and remained elevated for the 24-h recovery period (P < 0.05). Comparative to CONT, the post-recovery rate of reduction in Tcore, HR and MS was enhanced with CWI whilst increasing MVC and VA (P < 0.05). In contrast, 24-h post-recovery MVC and activation were significantly higher in CONT compared to CWI (P = 0.05). Following exercise in the heat, CWI accelerated the reduction in thermal and cardiovascular load, and improved MVC alongside increased central activation immediately and 2-h post-recovery. However, despite improved acute recovery CWI resulted in an attenuated MVC 24-h post-recovery.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of a thermal storage unit under the influence of nano-particles added to the phase change material and/or the working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolghasemi, Mehran; Keshavarz, Ali; Mehrabian, Mozaffar Ali

    2012-11-01

    The thermal storage unit consists of two concentric cylinders where the working fluid flows through the internal cylinder and the annulus is filled with a phase change material. The system carries out a cyclic operation; each cycle consists of two processes. In the charging process the hot working fluid enters the internal cylinder and transfers heat to the phase change material. In the discharging process the cold working fluid enters the internal cylinder and absorbs heat from the phase change material. The differential equations governing the heat transfer between the two media are solved numerically. The numerical results are compared with the experimental results available in the literature. The performance of an energy storage unit is directly related to the thermal conductivity of nano-particles. The energy consumption of a residential unit whose energy is supplied by a thermal storage system can be reduced by 43 % when using nano-particles.

  9. IN-SITU THERMAL REMEDIATION: MECHANISMS, PRINCIPLES, AND CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the early 1990's, thermal methods of enhanced oil recovery have been adapted for the remediation of soils and groundwater. Steam injection and electrical resistance heating have proven to be robust and aggressive techniques for the enhanced recovery of volatile and semivol...

  10. Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabov, G. A., E-mail: georgy.ryabov@gmail.com; Folomeev, O. M.; Sankin, D. A.

    2010-07-15

    Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large power generating units are examined. The problems with raising the steam parameters and unit power of boilers with a circulating fluidized bed are examined. With the boiler system at the 460 MW unit at Lagisza (Poland) as an example, the feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat of the effluent gases and reducing expenditure for in-house needs is demonstrated. Comparative estimates of the capital and operating costs of 225 and 330 MW units aremore » used to determine the conditions for optimum use of CFB boilers in the engineering renovation of thermal power plants in Russia. New areas for the application of CFB technology in CO{sub 2} capture are analyzed in connection with the problem of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.« less

  11. What does recovery mean in practice? A qualitative analysis of international recovery-oriented practice guidance.

    PubMed

    Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Bird, Victoria J; Davidson, Larry; Williams, Julie; Slade, Mike

    2011-12-01

    Recovery is a multifaceted concept, and the need for operationalization in practice has been identified. Although guidance on recovery-oriented practice exists, it is from disparate sources and is difficult to apply. The aims of the study were to identify the key characteristics of recovery-oriented practice guidance on the basis of current international perspectives and to develop an overarching conceptual framework to aid the translation of recovery guidance into practice. A qualitative analysis of 30 international documents offering recovery-oriented practice guidance was conducted. Inductive, semantic-level, thematic analysis was used to identify dominant themes. Interpretive analysis was then undertaken to group the themes into practice domains. The guidance documents were diverse; from six countries-the United States, England, Scotland, Republic of Ireland, Denmark, and New Zealand-and varied in document type, categories of guidance, and level of service user involvement in guidance development. The emerging conceptual framework consists of 16 dominant themes, grouped into four practice domains: promoting citizenship, organizational commitment, supporting personally defined recovery, and working relationship. A key challenge for mental health services is the lack of clarity about what constitutes recovery-oriented practice. The conceptual framework contributes to this knowledge gap and provides a synthesis of recovery-oriented practice guidance.

  12. Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6) - Day 5 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-21

    Teams from the U.S. Navy’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3, the Special Boat Unit, the USS Anchorage and the USS New Orleans work together to connect tending lines to the Orion test article off the coast of San Diego. Kennedy Space Center’s NASA Recovery Team works with the U.S. Navy to improve recovery procedures and hardware ahead of Orion's next flight, Exploration Mission-1, when it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Thermal performance and heat transport in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, W. T.; Doornenbal, P. J.; Drijver, B. C.; van Gaans, P. F. M.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J. T. C.; Rijnaarts, H. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is used for seasonal storage of large quantities of thermal energy. Due to the increasing demand for sustainable energy, the number of ATES systems has increased rapidly, which has raised questions on the effect of ATES systems on their surroundings as well as their thermal performance. Furthermore, the increasing density of systems generates concern regarding thermal interference between the wells of one system and between neighboring systems. An assessment is made of (1) the thermal storage performance, and (2) the heat transport around the wells of an existing ATES system in the Netherlands. Reconstruction of flow rates and injection and extraction temperatures from hourly logs of operational data from 2005 to 2012 show that the average thermal recovery is 82 % for cold storage and 68 % for heat storage. Subsurface heat transport is monitored using distributed temperature sensing. Although the measurements reveal unequal distribution of flow rate over different parts of the well screen and preferential flow due to aquifer heterogeneity, sufficient well spacing has avoided thermal interference. However, oversizing of well spacing may limit the number of systems that can be realized in an area and lower the potential of ATES.

  14. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-07

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  15. Response and Recovery of Streams From an Extreme Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantack, K. M.; Renshaw, C. E.; Magilligan, F. J.; Dethier, E.

    2015-12-01

    In temperate regions, channels are expected to recover from intense floods in a matter of months to years, but quantitative empirical support for this idea remains limited. Moreover, existing literature fails to address the spatial variability of the recovery process. Using an emerging technology, we investigate the immediate response to and progressive recovery of channels in the Northeastern United States from an extreme flood. We seek to determine what factors, including the nature and extent of the immediate response of the channel to the flood and post-flood availability of sediment, contribute to the spatial variability of the rate of recovery. Taking advantage of the 2011 flooding from Tropical Storm Irene, for which pre- and post-flood aerial lidar exist, along with a third set of terrestrial lidar collected in 2015, we assess channel response and recovery with multi-temporal lidar comparison. This method, with kilometers of continuous data, allows for analysis beyond traditional cross-section and reach-scale studies. Results indicate that landscape-scale factors, such as valley morphology and gradients in unit stream power, are controls on channel response to the flood, producing spatially variable impacts. Along a 16.4-km section (drainage area = 82 km2) of the Deerfield River in Vermont, over 148,000 m3 or erosion occurred during the flood. The spatial variation of impacts was correlated (R2= 0.476) with the ratio of channel width to valley width. We expect the recovery process will similarly exhibit spatial variation in rate and magnitude, possibly being governed by gradients in unit stream power and sediment availability. We test the idea that channel widening during the flood reduces post-flood unit stream power, creating a pathway for deposition and recovery to pre-flood width. Flood-widened reaches downstream of point-sources of sediment, such as landslides, will recover more quickly than those without consistent sediment supply. Results of this

  16. Integrated analysis of error detection and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y. H.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated modeling and analysis of error detection and recovery is presented. When fault latency and/or error latency exist, the system may suffer from multiple faults or error propagations which seriously deteriorate the fault-tolerant capability. Several detection models that enable analysis of the effect of detection mechanisms on the subsequent error handling operations and the overall system reliability were developed. Following detection of the faulty unit and reconfiguration of the system, the contaminated processes or tasks have to be recovered. The strategies of error recovery employed depend on the detection mechanisms and the available redundancy. Several recovery methods including the rollback recovery are considered. The recovery overhead is evaluated as an index of the capabilities of the detection and reconfiguration mechanisms.

  17. The effectiveness of using the combined-cycle technology in a nuclear power plant unit equipped with an SVBR-100 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Dudolin, A. A.; Gospodchenkov, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    The design of a modular SVBR-100 reactor with a lead-bismuth alloy liquid-metal coolant is described. The basic thermal circuit of a power unit built around the SVBR-100 reactor is presented together with the results of its calculation. The gross electrical efficiency of the turbine unit driven by saturated steam at a pressure of 6.7 MPa is estimated at η{el/gr} = 35.5%. Ways for improving the efficiency of this power unit and increasing its power output by applying gas-turbine and combined-cycle technologies are considered. With implementing a combined-cycle power-generating system comprising two GE-6101FA gas-turbine units with a total capacity of 140 MW, it becomes possible to obtain the efficiency of the combined-cycle plant equipped with the SVBR-100 reactor η{el/gr} = 45.39% and its electrical power output equal to 328 MW. The heat-recovery boiler used as part of this power installation generates superheated steam with a temperature of 560°C, due to which there is no need to use a moisture separator/steam reheater in the turbine unit thermal circuit.

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: THE ECO LOGIC THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - MIDDLEGROUND LANDFILL - BAY CITY, MI - ELI ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ECO Logic has developed a thermal desorption unit 0"DU) for the treatment of soils contaminated with hazardous organic contaminants. This TDU has been designed to be used in conjunction with Eco Logic's patented gas-phase chemical reduction reactor. The Eco Logic reactor is the s...

  19. 42 CFR 57.1516 - Right of recovery-subordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Right of recovery-subordination. 57.1516 Section 57.1516 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR... Personnel § 57.1516 Right of recovery-subordination. (a) The United States shall be entitled to recover from...

  20. Medication-assisted recovery from opioid addiction: historical and contemporary perspectives.

    PubMed

    White, William L

    2012-01-01

    Recovery is being used as a conceptual fulcrum for the redesign of addiction treatment and related support services in the United States. Efforts by policy, research, and clinical leaders to define recovery and calls for assertive models of long-term recovery management raise critical questions about how transformation efforts of recovery-focused systems will affect the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of opioid addiction and the status of patients participating in such treatment. This article highlights recent work advocating a recovery-oriented approach to medication-assisted treatment.

  1. Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients

    DOEpatents

    Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

    2014-10-28

    A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

  2. 46 CFR 108.555 - Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements. 108.555 Section 108.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.555 Lifeboat launching and recovery...

  3. 46 CFR 108.555 - Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements. 108.555 Section 108.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.555 Lifeboat launching and recovery...

  4. 46 CFR 108.555 - Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements. 108.555 Section 108.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.555 Lifeboat launching and recovery...

  5. Photothermal camera port accessory for microscopic thermal diffusivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escola, Facundo Zaldívar; Kunik, Darío; Mingolo, Nelly; Martínez, Oscar Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The design of a scanning photothermal accessory is presented, which can be attached to the camera port of commercial microscopes to measure thermal diffusivity maps with micrometer resolution. The device is based on the thermal expansion recovery technique, which measures the defocusing of a probe beam due to the curvature induced by the local heat delivered by a focused pump beam. The beam delivery and collecting optics are built using optical fiber technology, resulting in a robust optical system that provides collinear pump and probe beams without any alignment adjustment necessary. The quasiconfocal configuration for the signal collection using the same optical fiber sets very restrictive conditions on the positioning and alignment of the optical components of the scanning unit, and a detailed discussion of the design equations is presented. The alignment procedure is carefully described, resulting in a system so robust and stable that no further alignment is necessary for the day-to-day use, becoming a tool that can be used for routine quality control, operated by a trained technician.

  6. A Review on Electroactive Polymers for Waste Heat Recovery.

    PubMed

    Kolasińska, Ewa; Kolasiński, Piotr

    2016-06-17

    This paper reviews materials for thermoelectric waste heat recovery, and discusses selected industrial and distributed waste heat sources as well as recovery methods that are currently applied. Thermoelectric properties, especially electrical conductivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and the thermoelectric figures of merit, are considered when evaluating thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. Alloys and oxides are briefly discussed as materials suitable for medium- and high-grade sources. Electroactive polymers are presented as a new group of materials for low-grade sources. Polyaniline is a particularly fitting polymer for these purposes. We also discuss types of modifiers and modification methods, and their influence on the thermoelectric performance of this class of polymers.

  7. Thermal Cycle Testing of the Powersphere Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Mike; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Peterson, Todd T.; Scheiman, David A.; Simburger, Edward J.; Giants, Thomas W.; Matsumoto, James H.; Garcia, Alexander; Liu, Simon H.; hide

    2007-01-01

    During the past three years the team of The Aerospace Corporation, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, NASA Glenn Research Center, and ILC Dover LP have been developing a multifunctional inflatable structure for the PowerSphere concept under contract with NASA (NAS3-01115). The PowerSphere attitude insensitive solar power-generating microsatellite, which could be used for many different space and Earth science purposes, is ready for further refinement and flight demonstration. The development of micro- and nanosatellites requires the energy collection system, namely the solar array, to be of lightweight and small size. The limited surface area of these satellites precludes the possibility of body mounting the solar array system for required power generation. The use of large traditional solar arrays requires the support of large satellite volumes and weight and also requires a pointing apparatus. The current PowerSphere concept (geodetic sphere), which was envisioned in the late 1990 s by Mr. Simburger of The Aerospace Corporation, has been systematically developed in the past several years.1-7 The PowerSphere system is a low mass and low volume system suited for micro and nanosatellites. It is a lightweight solar array that is spherical in shape and does not require a pointing apparatus. The recently completed project culminated during the third year with the manufacturing of the PowerSphere Engineering Development Unit (EDU). One hemisphere of the EDU system was tested for packing and deployment and was subsequently rigidized. The other hemisphere was packed and stored for future testing in an uncured state. Both cured and uncured hemisphere components were delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center for thermal cycle testing and long-term storage respectively. This paper will discuss the design, thermal cycle testing of the PowerSphere EDU.

  8. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  9. Warm immersion recovery test in assessment of diabetic neuropathy--a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Bharara, Manish; Viswanathan, Vijay; Cobb, Jonathan E

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present results of warm immersion recovery test in the diabetic foot with neuropathy using a liquid crystal-based contact thermography system. It is intended to provide a 'proof of concept' for promoting the role of supplementary thermal assessment techniques and evidence-based diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 81 subjects from the outpatient department of MV Hospital for Diabetes, India, were assessed using a liquid crystal thermography system. Each subject was assigned to one of three study groups, that is diabetic neuropathy, diabetic non neuropathy and non diabetic healthy. The room temperature and humidity were consistently maintained at 24 degrees C and less than 50%, respectively, with air conditioning. The right foot for each subject was located on the measurement platform after warm immersion in water at 37 degrees C. Whole-field thermal images of the plantar foot were recorded for 10 minutes. Local measurements at the most prevalent sites of ulceration, that is metatarsal heads, great toe and heel, show highest temperature deficit after recovery for diabetic neuropathy group. The findings of the current study support the ones of a previous study by the authors, which used cold immersion recovery test for the neuropathic assessment of the diabetic foot. A temperature deficit between the recovery and the baseline temperature for the neuropathic group suggests degeneration of thermoreceptors. Thermal stimulus tests can be useful to validate the nutritional deficits' (during plantar loading and thermal stimulus) contribution in foot ulceration.

  10. Evaluation of the United States public health service guidelines for discontinuation of anticytomegalovirus therapy after immune recovery in patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Janet T; Colvin, Ryan; van Natta, Mark L; Thorne, Jennifer E; Bardsley, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate United States Public Health Service (USPHS) guidelines for discontinuing anticytomegalovirus (CMV) therapy in patients with AIDS who have immune recovery and quiescent retinitis after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy. Cohort study of patients with CMV retinitis (Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS). Participants had CMV retinitis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 50 cells/μL or fewer enrolled from 1998 through 2009 who demonstrated sustained immune recovery (2 consecutive CD4+ T-cell counts of 100 cells/μL or more at least 6 months apart) and inactive retinitis. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to anti-CMV treatment after immune recover: (1) continued anti-CMV therapy and (2) discontinued therapy. We evaluated survival, visual acuity, and CMV retinitis activity; we used propensity scores to adjust for confounding factors for these analyses. Of 152 participants reviewed, 71 demonstrated immune recovery, 37 of whom discontinued therapy and 34 of whom continued therapy. At immune recovery, participants continuing therapy tended to be older (44 vs 40 years; P = .09), have bilateral retinitis (53% vs 32%; P = .10), and have lower CD4+ T-cell counts (148 vs 207 cells/μL; P < .001). There were no statistical differences in any of the clinical outcomes (death, retinitis progress, visual acuity, or incidence of bilateral retinitis). Both groups lost visual acuity during follow-up, on average 1.2 letters per year (P < .01). Discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after immune recovery did not increase the risk of poor outcomes. These results support the current guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after achievement of sustained immune recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 77 FR 74688 - Final Recovery Plan, First Revision; Mexican Spotted Owl

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah, and south through the Sierra Madre Occidental and Sierra Madre Oriental in Mexico. The recovery plan includes specific recovery objectives and criteria to be met...). The revised recovery plan was prepared by a team of experts from both the United States and Mexico...

  12. The failure analysis, redesign, and final preparation of the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit for flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamkin, T.; Whitney, Brian

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the engineering thought process behind the failure analysis, redesign, and rework of the flight hardware for the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU) experiment. This experiment was designed to study the zero-g performance of 2-methylpentane as a suitable phase change material. This hydrocarbon served as the cryogenic storage medium for the BETSU experiment which was flown 04 Mar 94 on board Shuttle STS-62. Ground testing had indicated satisfactory performance of the BETSU at the 120 Kelvin design temperature. However, questions remained as to the micro-gravity performance of this unit; potential deviations in ground (1 g) versus space flight (0 g) performance, and how the unit would operate in a realistic space environment undergoing cyclical operation. The preparations and rework performed on the BETSU unit, which failed initial flight qualification, give insight and lessons learned to successfully develop and qualify a space flight experiment.

  13. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : A Well Doublet Experiment at Increased Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Melville, J. G.; Parr, A. D.; King, D. A.; Hopf, M. T.

    1983-02-01

    The two main objectives of this communication are to present a study of potential advantages and disadvantages of the doublet supply-injection well configuration in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system and to report on aquifer storage problems with injection temperatures in the 80°C range. A 3-month injection-storage-recovery cycle followed by a 7.3-month cycle constituted the main experiment. The injection volumes were 25,402 m3 and 58,063 m3 at average temperatures of 58.5°C and 81°C respectively. Unlikely previous experiments at the Mobile site, no clogging of the injection well due to clay particle swelling, dispersion, and migration was observed. This is attributed to the fact that the supply water used for injection contained a cation concentration equal to or slightly greater than that in the native groundwater. For cycles I and II, the fraction of injected energy recovered in a volume of water equal to the injection volume was 0.56 and 0.45 respectively. Both groundwater temperature and tracer data support the conclusion that this relatively low recovery was due to the detrimental effects of free thermal convection, possibly augmented by longitudinal zones of high permeability. Construction of a partially penetrating recovery well improved recovery efficiency but is not thought to be an adequate solution to thermal stratification. A maximum increase of 1.24 cm in relative land surface elevation was recorded near the end of second cycle injection. The engineering implications of such an elevation change would have to be considered, especially if an ATES system were being designed in an urban environment. A third cycle was started at the Mobile site on April 7, 1982. This final experiment contains a partially penetrating, dual-recovery well system which is expected to maximize energy recovery from a thermally stratified storage aquifer.

  14. High-Resolution Thermal Inertia Mapping from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellon, M.T.; Jakosky, B.M.; Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution thermal inertia mapping results are presented, derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of the surface temperature of Mars obtained during the early portion of the MGS mapping mission. Thermal inertia is the key property controlling the diurnal surface temperature variations, and is dependent on the physical character of the top few centimeters of the surface. It represents a complex combination of particle size, rock abundance, exposures of bedrock, and degree of induration. In this work we describe the derivation of thermal inertia from TES data, present global scale analysis, and place these results into context with earlier work. A global map of nighttime thermal-bolometer-based thermal inertia is presented at 14?? per pixel resolution, with approximately 63% coverage between 50??S and 70??N latitude. Global analysis shows a similar pattern of high and low thermal inertia as seen in previous Viking low-resolution mapping. Significantly more detail is present in the high-resolution TES thermal inertia. This detail represents horizontal small-scale variability in the nature of the surface. Correlation with albedo indicates the presence of a previously undiscovered surface unit of moderate-to-high thermal inertia and intermediate albedo. This new unit has a modal peak thermal inertia of 180-250 J m-2 K-1 s-12 and a narrow range of albedo near 0.24. The unit, covering a significant fraction of the surface, typically surrounds the low thermal inertia regions and may comprise a deposit of indurated fine material. Local 3-km-resolution maps are also presented as examples of eolian, fluvial, and volcanic geology. Some impact crater rims and intracrater dunes show higher thermal inertias than the surrounding terrain; thermal inertia of aeolian deposits such as intracrater dunes may be related to average particle size. Outflow channels and valleys consistently show higher thermal inertias than the

  15. Effect of Body Composition on Physiological Responses to Cold-Water Immersion and the Recovery of Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Jessica M; Halson, Shona L; Miller, Joanna; Slater, Gary J; Chapman, Dale W; Askew, Christopher D

    2018-03-01

    To explore the influence of body composition on thermal responses to cold-water immersion (CWI) and the recovery of exercise performance. Male subjects were stratified into 2 groups: low fat (LF; n = 10) or high fat (HF; n = 10). Subjects completed a high-intensity interval test (HIIT) on a cycle ergometer followed by a 15-min recovery intervention (control [CON] or CWI). Core temperature (T c ), skin temperature, and heart rate were recorded continuously. Performance was assessed at baseline, immediately post-HIIT, and 40 min postrecovery using a 4-min cycling time trial (TT), countermovement jump (CMJ), and isometric midthigh pull (IMTP). Perceptual measures (thermal sensation [TS], total quality of recovery [TQR], soreness, and fatigue) were also assessed. T c and TS were significantly lower in LF than in HF from 10 min (T c, LF 36.5°C ± 0.5°C, HF 37.2°C ± 0.6°C; TS, LF 2.3 ± 0.5 arbitrary units [a.u.], HF 3.0 ± 0.7 a.u.) to 40 min (T c , LF 36.1°C ± 0.6°C, HF 36.8°C ±0.7°C; TS, LF 2.3 ± 0.6 a.u., HF 3.2 ± 0.7 a.u.) after CWI (P < .05). Recovery of TT performance was significantly enhanced after CWI in HF (10.3 ± 6.1%) compared with LF (3.1 ± 5.6%, P = .01); however, no differences were observed between HF (6.9% ±5.7%) and LF (5.4% ± 5.2%) with CON. No significant differences were observed between groups for CMJ, IMTP, TQR, soreness, or fatigue in either condition. Body composition influences the magnitude of T c change during and after CWI. In addition, CWI enhanced performance recovery in the HF group only. Therefore, body composition should be considered when planning CWI protocols to avoid overcooling and maximize performance recovery.

  16. Opportunities and Barriers to Resource Recovery and Recycling from Shredder Residue in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Naren; Apelian, Diran

    2014-11-01

    Shredder residue is the by-product remaining after ferrous and nonferrous metals have been recovered from the processing of vehicles, white goods, and peddler scrap. Shredder residue consists of glass, plastics, rubber, dirt, and small amounts of metal. It is estimated that 5-7 million tons of this shredder residue are landfilled each year in the United States. Technical advancements, coupled with European Union directives and the economic climate, have transformed the recycling of shredder residue in Europe. In the United States, however, regulatory controls and the cheap cost of landfill have worked against the advancement of recycling and recovery of this resource. The Argonne National Laboratory, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, has investigated the effectiveness of recycling shredder residue into polymers. Other research has examined the use of shredder residue in waste-to-energy applications. To improve our ability to process and recycle shredder residue, an investigation of the regulatory, economic, and technological challenges was undertaken. The objective was to conduct a comprehensive review of work done to date, to document the composition of typical shredder output and to identify potential recoverable items (residual metals, plastics, rubber, foam, etc.). Along with uncovering potential new markets, the research would identify the technical, regulatory, and economic barriers to developing those markets.

  17. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The second Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite mission currently planned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration will measure global ice topography and canopy height using the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System {ATLAS). The ATLAS comprises two lasers; but only one will be used at a time. Each laser will generate between 125 watts and 250 watts of heat, and each laser has its own optimal operating temperature that must be maintained within plus or minus 1 degree Centigrade accuracy by the Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) consisting of a constant conductance heat pipe (CCHP), a loop heat pipe (LHP) and a radiator. The heat generated by the laser is acquired by the CCHP and transferred to the LHP, which delivers the heat to the radiator for ultimate rejection. The radiator can be exposed to temperatures between minus 71 degrees Centigrade and minus 93 degrees Centigrade. The two lasers can have different operating temperatures varying between plus 15 degrees Centigrade and plus 30 degrees Centigrade, and their operating temperatures are not known while the LTCS is being designed and built. Major challenges of the LTCS include: 1) A single thermal control system must maintain the ATLAS at 15 degrees Centigrade with 250 watts heat load and minus 71 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature, and maintain the ATLAS at plus 30 degrees Centigrade with 125 watts heat load and minus 93 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature. Furthermore, the LTCS must be qualification tested to maintain the ATLAS between plus 10 degrees Centigrade and plus 35 degrees Centigrade. 2) The LTCS must be shut down to ensure that the ATLAS can be maintained above its lowest desirable temperature of minus 2 degrees Centigrade during the survival mode. No software control algorithm for LTCS can be activated during survival and only thermostats can be used. 3) The radiator must be kept above minus 65 degrees Centigrade to prevent ammonia from freezing using no more

  18. Recovery of forest residues in the Southern United States

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Donald L. Sirois

    1989-01-01

    In the mid 1970's, the accelerated price increases for petroleum products forced rapid exploration into and adoption of alternative energy sources. A viable option for the forest industry was the recovery of woody biomass from unmerchantable trees and logging residues. Several studies estimated that an abundance of such forest materials existed in the southeastern...

  19. Regional water consumption for hydro and thermal electricity generation in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Uisung; Han, Jeongwoo; Elgowainy, Amgad; ...

    2017-05-18

    Water is an essential resource for most electric power generation technologies. Thermal power plants typically require a large amount of cooling water whose evaporation is regarded to be consumed. Hydropower plants result in evaporative water loss from the large surface areas of the storing reservoirs. This paper estimated the regional water consumption factors (WCFs) for thermal and hydro electricity generation in the United States, because the WCFs of these power plants vary by region and water supply and demand balance are of concern in many regions. For hydropower, total WCFs were calculated using a reservoir’s surface area, state-level water evaporation,more » and background evapotranspiration. Then, for a multipurpose reservoir, a fraction of its WCF was allocated to hydropower generation based on the share of the economic valuation of hydroelectricity among benefits from all purposes of the reservoir. For thermal power plants, the variations in WCFs by type of cooling technology, prime mover technology, and by region were addressed. The results show that WCFs for electricity generation vary significantly by region. Finally, the generation-weighted average WCFs of thermoelectricity and hydropower are 1.25 (range of 0.18–2.0) and 16.8 (range of 0.67–1194) L/kWh, respectively, and the generation-weighted average WCF by the U.S. generation mix in 2015 is estimated at 2.18 L/kWh.« less

  20. Regional water consumption for hydro and thermal electricity generation in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Uisung; Han, Jeongwoo; Elgowainy, Amgad

    Water is an essential resource for most electric power generation technologies. Thermal power plants typically require a large amount of cooling water whose evaporation is regarded to be consumed. Hydropower plants result in evaporative water loss from the large surface areas of the storing reservoirs. This paper estimated the regional water consumption factors (WCFs) for thermal and hydro electricity generation in the United States, because the WCFs of these power plants vary by region and water supply and demand balance are of concern in many regions. For hydropower, total WCFs were calculated using a reservoir’s surface area, state-level water evaporation,more » and background evapotranspiration. Then, for a multipurpose reservoir, a fraction of its WCF was allocated to hydropower generation based on the share of the economic valuation of hydroelectricity among benefits from all purposes of the reservoir. For thermal power plants, the variations in WCFs by type of cooling technology, prime mover technology, and by region were addressed. The results show that WCFs for electricity generation vary significantly by region. Finally, the generation-weighted average WCFs of thermoelectricity and hydropower are 1.25 (range of 0.18–2.0) and 16.8 (range of 0.67–1194) L/kWh, respectively, and the generation-weighted average WCF by the U.S. generation mix in 2015 is estimated at 2.18 L/kWh.« less

  1. A dimensionless parameter approach to the thermal behavior of an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, C.; Hellstrom, G.; Tsang, C. F.; Claesson, J.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) site-characterization studies is to develop a general procedure whereby the energy recovery factor for a given site may be predicted readily for a wide range of operating conditions without doing detailed numerical simulations. The thermal behavior of a ATES system with steady radial fluid flow around a single injection/production well is discussed. Buoyancy flow is neglected, and the aquifer is confined above and below by impermeable confining layers.

  2. Microplastic at nesting grounds used by the northern Gulf of Mexico loggerhead recovery unit.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Valencia K; Fuentes, Mariana M P B

    2018-06-01

    Microplastics can impact key habitats used by endangered species, such as marine turtles. They impact the environment by transporting toxicants and altering sediment properties affecting temperature and sediment permeability. Our study determined the exposure of the ten most important nesting sites for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Loggerhead Recovery Unit to microplastic. Sand samples were obtained at each nesting site during the 2017 nesting season and analyzed for abundance and characteristics of microplastic. Microplastic was found at all sites, with an average abundance of 61.08 ± 34.61 pieces/m 2 , and 59.9% located at the dunes, where turtles primarily nest. A gradual decrease in microplastics abundance was observed from the most western nesting ground to the east. The results from this study indicate that microplastic accumulation on nesting sites for the Northern Gulf of Mexico may be of great concern, and could negatively affect the incubating environment for marine turtles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Redesign of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Elms, Theresa; Peyton, Barbara; Rector, Tony; Jennings, Mallory A.

    2016-01-01

    During EVA (Extravehicular Activity) 23 aboard the ISS (International Space Station) on 07/16/2013 an episode of water in the EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) helmet occurred, necessitating a termination of the EVA (Extravehicular Activity) shortly after it began. The root cause of the failure was determined to be ground-processing short-comings of the ALCLR (Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery) Ion Beds which led to various levels of contaminants being introduced into the Ion Beds before they left the ground. The Ion Beds were thereafter used to scrub the failed EMU cooling water loop on-orbit during routine scrubbing operations. The root cause investigation identified several areas for improvement of the ALCLR Assembly which have since been initiated. Enhanced washing techniques for the ALCLR Ion Bed have been developed and implemented. On-orbit cooling water conductivity and pH analysis capability to allow the astronauts to monitor proper operation of the ALCLR Ion Bed during scrubbing operation is being investigation. A simplified means to acquire on-orbit EMU cooling water samples have been designed. Finally, an inherently cleaner organic adsorbent to replace the current lignite-based activated carbon, and a non-separable replacement for the separable mixed ion exchange resin are undergoing evaluation. These efforts are undertaken to enhance the performance and reduce the risk associated with operations to ensure the long-term health of the EMU cooling water circuit.

  4. Redesign of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Elms, Theresa; Peyton, Barbara; Rector, Tony; Jennings, Mallory

    2016-01-01

    During EVA (Extravehicular Activity) 23 aboard the ISS (International Space Station) on 07/16/2013 an episode of water in the EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) helmet occurred, necessitating a termination of the EVA (Extravehicular Activity) shortly after it began. The root cause of the failure was determined to be ground-processing short-comings of the ALCLR (Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery) Ion Beds which led to various levels of contaminants being introduced into the Ion Beds before they left the ground. The Ion Beds were thereafter used to scrub the failed EMU cooling water loop on-orbit during routine scrubbing operations. The root cause investigation identified several areas for improvement of the ALCLR Assembly which have since been initiated. Enhanced washing techniques for the ALCLR Ion Bed have been developed and implemented. On-orbit cooling water conductivity and pH analysis capability to allow the astronauts to monitor proper operation of the ALCLR Ion Bed during scrubbing operation is being investigated. A simplified means to acquire on-orbit EMU cooling water samples has been designed. Finally, an inherently cleaner organic adsorbent to replace the current lignite-based activated carbon, and a non-separable replacement for the separable mixed ion exchange resin are undergoing evaluation. These efforts are undertaken to enhance the performance and reduce the risk associated with operations to ensure the long-term health of the EMU cooling water circuit.

  5. Aquifer thermal energy storage - A feasibility study for large scale demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, W. V.; Supkow, D. J.

    Engineering procedures necessary for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), based on studies of the Magothy Aquifer on Long Island, NY, are presented, with chilled winter water pumped into the aquifer and reclaimed in summer months for air conditioning. The choice of aquifer involves necessary volume, flow rate, efficiency of thermal recovery, and avoidance of conflict with other users; utilization depends on choice of appropriate piping, heat exchangers, and well construction to prevent degradation of the aquifer. The methods employed to probe the Magothy for suitability are described, including drilling an asymmetric well cluster for observation, and 48 hr pumping and 8 hr recovery. Transmissivity was found to vary from 8,000 to 29,000 sq ft/day. A doublet well was then drilled and water withdrawn, chilled, and returned. Later withdrawal indicated a 46% thermal recovery, with computer models projecting 80% with additional cycling. The study verified the feasibility of ATES, which can be expanded with additional demand.

  6. Three approaches for estimating recovery factors in carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-07-17

    PrefaceThe Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) and requested the USGS to estimate the “potential volumes of oil and gas recoverable by injection and sequestration of industrial carbon dioxide in potential sequestration formations” (42 U.S.C. 17271(b)(4)). Geologic CO2 sequestration associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using CO2 in existing hydrocarbon reservoirs has the potential to increase the U.S. hydrocarbon recoverable resource. The objective of this report is to provide detailed information on three approaches that can be used to calculate the incremental recovery factors for CO2-EOR. Therefore, the contents of this report could form an integral part of an assessment methodology that can be used to assess the sedimentary basins of the United States for the hydrocarbon recovery potential using CO2-EOR methods in conventional oil reservoirs.

  7. Incidence and predictors of myocardial recovery on long-term left ventricular assist device support: Results from the United Network for Organ Sharing database.

    PubMed

    Pan, Stephen; Aksut, Baran; Wever-Pinzon, Omar E; Rao, Shaline D; Levin, Allison P; Garan, Arthur R; Fried, Justin A; Takeda, Koji; Hiroo, Takayama; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; Mancini, Donna M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Colombo, Paolo C; Topkara, Veli K

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) leads to favorable changes in the failing heart at the molecular, cellular, and structural levels. However, myocardial recovery leading to device explantation is rare. We reasoned that the multicenter United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry might provide insights into clinical predictors and outcomes of the recovery process. The MCS device data set of the UNOS registry was queried for patients with long-term continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) that were explanted for heart transplantation or indication of recovery. Analysis was restricted to adult patients (≥18 years old) who were listed for an initial heart transplantation. Patients with CF-LVADs that were explanted because of recovery were compared with patients with CF-LVADs who underwent transplantation. We identified 594 patients with HeartMate II devices and 92 patients with HeartWare devices. Duration of support was on average 500.4 ± 325.3 days. In 34 (5.0%) patients, devices were explanted secondary to myocardial recovery. Univariate predictors of recovery in patients with long-term LVADs included younger age (40 years vs 53 years), female sex, lower body mass index (25.7 kg/m(2) vs 27.9 kg/m(2)), non-ischemic etiology (91% vs 59%), lack of implantable cardioverter defibrillator at the time of listing (44% vs 79%), and lower serum creatinine (0.97 mg/dl vs 1.28 mg/dl) (all p < 0.05). In the post-explantation period, freedom from death or transplantation was 66% at 1 year. The incidence of recovery on device support is low in the current MCS era and limited to a select cohort of predominantly young patients with non-ischemic myopathy. Given the high incidence of disease recurrence, patients should be closely followed after device explantation. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Special mobile rescue unit can speed recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1977-04-01

    Since time is often a matter of life and death in a mine disaster, Mine Emergency Operations (MEO) personnel are prepared to begin rescue work at any mining site in the eastern part of the United States within six hours of notification, and within no more than nine hours in the western United States. The entire MEO force, including vans, trucks, bulldozers to clear and level the drilling site, seismic equipment, and the big drilling rig can be on any site within less than 20 hours of a disaster. The speed of deployment is made possible in some measure bymore » a special agreement between MESA and the United States Air Force, which stands ready 24 hours a day to dispatch giant C-130 cargo aircraft to airlift the tons of bulky MEO equipment. While the big drilling rig is usually taken to disaster sites by highway, it can also be airlifted when necessary.« less

  9. 40 CFR 63.1566 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1566 What...

  10. Overcoming challenges to the recovery of declining amphibian populations in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walls, Susan; Ball, Lianne C.; Barichivich, William J.; Dodd, Kenneth; Enge, Kevin M; Gorman, Thomas A.; O'Donnell, Katherine; Palis, John G; Semlitsch, Raymond D.

    2016-01-01

    The US Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) affords many potential benefits to species threatened with extinction. However, most at-risk amphibians—one of the most imperiled vertebrate groups—remain unlisted under the provisions of the ESA, and many impediments to recovery exist for those species that have been listed. Of the 35 US amphibian species and distinct population segments (“taxa”) listed under the ESA, 40% currently lack a final (completed) recovery plan, 28.6% lack designated critical habitat, and 8.6% lack both. For taxa that have recovery plans, the time between their listing and the development of those plans was from 2 to 29 years, and the time between their listing and the designation of critical habitat ranged from 0 to 14 years. The underlying causes of such delays in protection are complex and constitute obstacles to recovery of imperiled species. We outline a series of strategic actions by which these challenges may be overcome.

  11. A Review on Electroactive Polymers for Waste Heat Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kolasińska, Ewa; Kolasiński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews materials for thermoelectric waste heat recovery, and discusses selected industrial and distributed waste heat sources as well as recovery methods that are currently applied. Thermoelectric properties, especially electrical conductivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and the thermoelectric figures of merit, are considered when evaluating thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. Alloys and oxides are briefly discussed as materials suitable for medium- and high-grade sources. Electroactive polymers are presented as a new group of materials for low-grade sources. Polyaniline is a particularly fitting polymer for these purposes. We also discuss types of modifiers and modification methods, and their influence on the thermoelectric performance of this class of polymers. PMID:28773605

  12. Low-Energy Water Recovery from Subsurface Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Chul; Kim, Gyu Dong; Hendren, Zachary

    A novel non-aqueous phase solvent (NAS) desalination process was proposed and developed in this research project. The NAS desalination process uses less energy than thermal processes, doesn’t require any additional chemicals for precipitation, and can be utilized to treat high TDS brine. In this project, our experimental work determined that water solubility changes and selective absorption are the key characteristics of NAS technology for successful desalination. Three NAS desalination mechanisms were investigated: (1) CO2 switchable, (2) high-temp absorption to low-temp desorption (thermally switchable), and (3) low-temp absorption to high-temp desorption (thermally switchable). Among these mechanisms, thermally switchable (low-temp absorption tomore » high-temp desorption) showed the highest water recovery and relatively high salt rejection. A test procedure for semi-continuous, bench scale NAS desalination process was also developed and used to assess performance under a range of conditions.« less

  13. Stranded cost recovery: Reregulating the electricity markets in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Pushkar Ghanashyam

    2000-10-01

    For the past few years, Stranded Cost recovery has been one of the most contentious issues regarding the restructuring of electricity markets among the regulators, researchers, and the other interested parties. Among the states that have moved towards retail competition, some have already made decisions regarding the levels of the stranded cost recovery. So the question is: how have these states handled the "stranded cost problem"? Following the introduction and the historical perspective of the industry in the first chapter, the second chapter takes a broad view for understanding the overall process of deregulation. It attempts to analyze why some states have made a rapid transition to competition in the electric utility industry, while other states are just beginning to consider the issue. White (1996) and Ando & Palmer (1998) have conducted a similar exercise. We present a more comprehensive and theoretically informed econometric analysis that sheds light over some of the crucial issues involved in restructuring, such as, stranded cost recovery, regulation of transmission and distribution sectors, and establishment of Independent System Operator, etc. This chapter offers the rationale for alternative econometric techniques, and extends the political economy analysis to incorporate actual timings of retail competition. Once we have identified the role of stranded cost in restructuring and the theoretical foundations, we study empirically the political economy of states' decisions to grant stranded cost recovery. This constitutes the third chapter. Here, we concentrate on California and Pennsylvania, two states that are at the frontiers of deregulation, and compare their respective treatments of the stranded cost. We probe the reasons behind Pennsylvania's lead over California on the path towards deregulation.

  14. An Innovative Very Low Thermal Power Waste Heat Recovery System for Thermal Control of Deep Space Missions: A Thermal Flask in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Future missions to deep space, such as those to the outer planets (Jupiter, Saturn, etc.), which would rely on solar photovoltaic power, would need extremely large solar arrays to produce sufficient power for their operations because solar intensity is so low at those locations. Hence any additional power that would be needed for thermal control is extremely limited. Previous deep space missions like Juno (to Jupiter) required almost 200 W of electrical power for thermal control. This is prohibitively large for many future mission concepts, and leads to them needing very large solar arrays. For Saturn, where the solar flux is 1/4th the flux at Jupiter, this would entail an extremely large increase in the solar array size to accommodate the need for thermal survival power, which would be prohibitively large in size and mass, and very expensive. Hence there is a need to come up with a thermal architecture and design options that would not need such prohibitively large thermal power levels. One solution relies on harvesting the pre-existing waste heat from all the heat dissipation that would be present from operation of electronics, instruments, etc. for their own functionality. For example, for a generic Saturn mission, the various electronics would already dissipate about 200 Watts of heat that is simply "thrown away" to space from the spacecraft surfaces. The amount of thermal power that would be required for the safe thermal control of components within the spacecraft in deep space would be roughly of this magnitude for this class of spacecraft. So it makes good sense to try to harvest the waste heat and employ it to maintain the temperatures of all the components within their allowable limits. In particular, propulsion systems typically need to be kept above their freezing limits, around room temperature (15 C). Electronics needs to be kept typically above -40 C and batteries above -20 C. The next question becomes how to harvest this waste heat and direct it to

  15. Heat recovery system series arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Justin P.; Welch, Andrew M.; Dawson, Gregory R.

    The present disclosure is directed to heat recovery systems that employ two or more organic Rankine cycle (ORC) units disposed in series. According to certain embodiments, each ORC unit includes an evaporator that heats an organic working fluid, a turbine generator set that expands the working fluid to generate electricity, a condenser that cools the working fluid, and a pump that returns the working fluid to the evaporator. The heating fluid is directed through each evaporator to heat the working fluid circulating within each ORC unit, and the cooling fluid is directed through each condenser to cool the working fluidmore » circulating within each ORC unit. The heating fluid and the cooling fluid flow through the ORC units in series in the same or opposite directions.« less

  16. 15 CFR 971.203 - Commercial recovery plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Applications Contents... requirements for resource assessment and logical mining unit (§ 971.501); (6) A description of the methods and...

  17. 15 CFR 971.203 - Commercial recovery plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Applications Contents... requirements for resource assessment and logical mining unit (§ 971.501); (6) A description of the methods and...

  18. 32 CFR 199.12 - Third party recoveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... United States has a right to collect under both 10 U.S.C. 1095b and the Federal Medical Care Recovery Act... and conditions of the third-party payer's plan. This is the sole purpose for which patient care... payer to enforce a right of the United States under 10 U.S.C. 1095b and this section. (2) This also...

  19. 32 CFR 199.12 - Third party recoveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... United States has a right to collect under both 10 U.S.C. 1095b and the Federal Medical Care Recovery Act... and conditions of the third-party payer's plan. This is the sole purpose for which patient care... payer to enforce a right of the United States under 10 U.S.C. 1095b and this section. (2) This also...

  20. 32 CFR 199.12 - Third party recoveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... United States has a right to collect under both 10 U.S.C. 1095b and the Federal Medical Care Recovery Act... and conditions of the third-party payer's plan. This is the sole purpose for which patient care... payer to enforce a right of the United States under 10 U.S.C. 1095b and this section. (2) This also...

  1. Water-Chemistry and Its Utility Systems in CCP Power Units (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, B. M.

    2018-01-01

    Damageability of heat transfer surfaces of waste heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) of combined- cycle plants (CCP) can be reduced due to an increase in the quality of make-up and feed water, the use of phosphate-alkaline or amino compound water chemistry (WC), and improved chemical quality control of the heat carrier and make-up water preparation techniques. Temporary quality standards for the heat medium developed by the All-Russia Thermal Engineering institute (VTI) for CCP power units are presented in comparison with the IAPWS standards; preferences for the choice of a WC type for some power units commissioned in Russia in the first decade of this century are shown; and operational data on the quality of feed, boiler water, and steam for two large CCP-450 and CCP-425 power units are given. The state and prospects for the development of chemical-technological monitoring systems and CCP water treatment plants are noted. Estimability of some CCP diagnostic parameters by measuring specific electric conductivity and pH is shown. An extensive bibliography on this topic is given.

  2. Peer-Delivered Recovery Support Services for Addictions in the United States: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Ellen L; Hanson, Justine; Greene, R Neil; Richard, Molly; Laudet, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review identifies, appraises, and summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of peer-delivered recovery support services for people in recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. Nine studies met criteria for inclusion in the review. They were assessed for quality and outcomes including substance use and recovery-related factors. Despite significant methodological limitations found in the included studies, the body of evidence suggests salutary effects on participants. Current limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stabilization of gas turbine unit power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotovskii, I.; Larin, E.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a new cycle air preparation unit which helps increasing energy power of gas turbine units (GTU) operating as a part of combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) units of thermal power stations and energy and water supply systems of industrial enterprises as well as reducing power loss of gas turbine engines of process blowers resulting from variable ambient air temperatures. Installation of GTU power stabilizer at CCGT unit with electric and thermal power of 192 and 163 MW, respectively, has resulted in reduction of produced electrical energy production costs by 2.4% and thermal energy production costs by 1.6% while capital expenditures after installation of this equipment increased insignificantly.

  4. Vehicle Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Model with Integrated Thermal Load Leveling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    recovery from automobile engine. Energy. 2010;35:1447–1454. 14 12. Ceraianu MO, Gontean A. Parasitic elements modelling in thermoelectric...JP, Sampath S. Heat transfer modeling and geometry optimization of TEG for automobile applications. Proceedings of the ASME Summer Heat Transfer

  5. Humidification of Blow-By Oxygen During Recovery of Postoperative Pediatric Patients: One Unit's Journey.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Suzanne; DiBlasi, Robert M; Thomas, Karen

    2018-02-02

    To examine the practice of nebulizer cool mist blow-by oxygen administered to spontaneously breathing postanesthesia care unit (PACU) pediatric patients during Phase one recovery. Existing evidence was evaluated. Informal benchmarking documented practices in peer organizations. An in vitro study was then conducted to simulate clinical practice and determine depth and amount of airway humidity delivery with blow-by oxygen. Informal benchmarking information was obtained by telephone interview. Using a three-dimensional printed simulation model of the head connected to a breathing lung simulator, depth and amount of moisture delivery in the respiratory tree were measured. Evidence specific to PACU administration of cool mist blow-by oxygen was limited. Informal benchmarking revealed that routine cool mist oxygenated blow-by administration was not widely practiced. The laboratory experiment revealed minimal moisture reaching the mid-tracheal area of the simulated airway model. Routine use of oxygenated cool mist in spontaneously breathing pediatric PACU patients is not supported. Copyright © 2017 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between thermal environment and Salmonella in fecal samples from dairy cattle in midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Likavec, Tasha; Pires, Alda F.A.; Funk, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the association between thermal measures in the barn environment (pen temperature and humidity) and fecal shedding of Salmonella in dairy cattle. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted within a commercial dairy herd located in the midwestern United States. Five pooled fecal samples were collected monthly from each pen for 9 mo and submitted for microbiological culture. Negative binomial regression methods were used to test the association [incidence rate ratio (IRR)] between Salmonella pen status (the count of Salmonella-positive pools) and thermal environmental parameters [average temperature and temperature humidity index (THI)] for 3 time periods (48 h, 72 h, and 1 wk) before fecal sampling. Salmonella was cultured from 10.8% [39/360; 95% confidence interval (CI): 7.8% to 14.5%] of pooled samples. The highest proportion of positive pools occurred in August. The IRR ranged from 1.26 (95% CI: 1.15 to 1.39, THI 1 wk) to 4.5 (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51, heat exposure 1 wk) across all thermal parameters and lag time periods measured. For example, the incidence rate of Salmonella-positive pools increased by 54% for every 5°C increment in average temperature (IRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.85) and 29% for every 5-unit increase in THI (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.16 to 1.42) during the 72 h before sampling. The incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to higher temperatures (> 25°C) was 4.5 times (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51) the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to temperatures < 25°C in the 72 h before sampling. Likewise, the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to THI > 70 was 4.23 times greater (95% CI: 2.1 to 8.28) than when the THI was < 70 in the 72 h before sampling. An association was found between the thermal environment and Salmonella shedding in dairy cattle. Further research is warranted in order to fully understand the component risks associated with the summer season and increased Salmonella shedding. PMID:27408330

  7. Building heating and cooling applications thermal energy storage program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissenberg, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal energy storage technology and development of building heating and cooling applications in the residential and commercial sectors is outlined. Three elements are identified to undergo an applications assessment, technology development, and demonstration. Emphasis is given to utility load management thermal energy system application where the stress is on the 'customer side of the meter'. Thermal storage subsystems for space conditioning and conservation means of increased thermal mass within the building envelope and by means of low-grade waste heat recovery are covered.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of Reading Recovery in United States Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome V.; Murphy, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 36 studies of Reading Recovery (RR), an intensive tutorial intervention designed to develop the literacy skills of low-performing first-grade students. Few individual studies of the program have yielded conclusive evidence regarding the program's effectiveness due to various methodological limitations. We relied on…

  9. Pressure-assisted thermal sterilization of soup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibeshi, Kidane; Farid, Mohammed M.

    2010-12-01

    The overall efficiency of an existing scale-up pressure-assisted thermal sterilization (PATS) unit was investigated with regards to inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in pumpkin soup. The PATS unit is a double pipe heat exchanger in which the soup is pumped into its inner high pressure tube and constrained by two high pressure valves, while steam is continuously passed through the annular region to heat the content. The technology is based on pressure generation by thermal expansion of the liquid in an enclosure. In this work, the addition of an air line to push the treated liquid food out of the existing PATS unit has improved the overall quality of the treated samples, as evidenced by achieving higher log reduction of the spores. Compared with thermal processing, the application of PATS shows the potential for lowering the thermal treatment temperature, offering improved food quality.

  10. Thermal energy storage evaluation and life testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two thermal energy storage (TES) units which were built under a previous contract were tested with a Hi-Cap Vuilleumier cryogenic cooler in the facility of the Hughes Aircraft Corporation. The objective of the program was the evaluation of the behavior of the TES units as well as the determination of the temperature history of the three cold stages of the Vuilleumier cryogenic cooler during cyclic charging and discharging of the TES units. The test results have confirmed that thermal energy storage can provide the necessary thermal power to the hot cylinders of the Vuilleumier cryogenic cooler at the required operating temperatures. Thereby the continuous cooling capability of the cooler during an eclipse when no electrical power is available is being assured. The cold stage temperature amplitudes during a complete charge discharge cycle of the TES units were only about 10% of the amplitudes which were observed when the Hi-Cap Vuilleumier cryogenic cooler was operating without thermal energy storage backup in a simulated orbit of 54 minutes sun exposure and 18 minutes eclipse time. The themal conductivity of the molten thermal energy storage salt was apparently only a fraction of the thermal conductivity which had been assumed for the prediction of the upper heater temperatures. A redesign of the heater temperatures below 1480 degrees F which is now required for full charging of the TES units within 54 minutes with the present heater design.

  11. Experimental and modeling study of forest fire effect on soil thermal conductivity

    Treesearch

    Kathleen M. Smits; Elizabeth Kirby; William J. Massman; Scott Baggett

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of soil thermal conductivity after a wildfire or controlled burn is important to land management and post-fire recovery efforts. Although soil thermal conductivity has been well studied for non-fire heated soils, comprehensive data that evaluate the long-term effect of extreme heating from a fire on the soil thermal conductivity are limited....

  12. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise

    PubMed Central

    Minett, Geoffrey M.; Duffield, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e., team sports) induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness, and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery strategies. The direction of this research narrative on post-exercise recovery differs to the increasing emphasis on the complex interaction between both central and peripheral factors regulating exercise intensity during exercise performance. Given the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in motor-unit recruitment during exercise, it too may have an integral role in post-exercise recovery. Indeed, this hypothesis is indirectly supported by an apparent disconnect in time-course changes in physiological and biochemical markers resultant from exercise and the ensuing recovery of exercise performance. Equally, improvements in perceptual recovery, even withstanding the physiological state of recovery, may interact with both feed-forward/feed-back mechanisms to influence subsequent efforts. Considering the research interest afforded to recovery methodologies designed to hasten the return of homeostasis within the muscle, the limited focus on contributors to post-exercise recovery from CNS origins is somewhat surprising. Based on this context, the current review aims to outline the potential contributions of the brain to performance recovery after strenuous exercise. PMID:24550837

  13. Production report: enhanced recovery. [Combustion, steam, soak steam drive, polymer and caustic, micellar/surfactant miscible hydrocarbons and CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Noran, D.

    Schemes for producing additional oil using enhanced-recovery (ER) methods are under way throughout the world. The extent and intensity of ER activity is highest in the U.S. with 156 projects, about two-thirds of which are thermal. Venezuela has a strong ER commitment with at least 70 active projects, with a major thrust on steam soak. Significant projects, but limited in number, are under way in Canada, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere in Latin America. A breakdown of active U.S. ER projects for 1970, 1973, and 1975 is tabulated for combustion, steam soak, steam drive, polymer and caustic, micellar/surfactant, misciblemore » hydrocarbon, and CO/sub 2/ methods. This Oil and Gas Journal Survey includes seven articles; the first six were prepared by David Noran, Journal Production Editor. The final article on Venezuelan activity was written by Alvaro Franco, Editor and Publisher, Petroleo Internacional. The articles are entitled: U.S. Thermal Recovery Activity Growing Steadily; Operators Accelerate Testing of Micellar/Surfactant Potential; Polymer and Caustic Methods on Rebound; Gas Miscible Projects Move at Slow Pace; Canadian Enhanced-Recovery Activity Moderate, Centers on Thermal Projects; Other Global Enhanced-Recovery Work Sparse; and Thermal Work Humming in Venezuela. Detailed information on each method is tabulated for each article. (MCW)« less

  14. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac; Peterson, Dr. Brian; Szybist, James P

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methodsmore » used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen

  15. Optimization of waste heat utilization in cold end system of thermal power station based on neural network algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zenghui

    2018-04-01

    At present, the flue gas waste heat utilization projects of coal-fired boilers are often limited by low temperature corrosion problems and conventional PID control. The flue gas temperature cannot be reduced to the best efficiency temperature of wet desulphurization, resulting in the failure of heat recovery to be the maximum. Therefore, this paper analyzes, researches and solves the remaining problems of the cold end system of thermal power station, so as to provide solutions and theoretical support for energy saving and emission reduction and upgrading and the improvement of the comprehensive efficiency of the units.

  16. Effect of primary and secondary parameters on analytical estimation of effective thermal conductivity of two phase materials using unit cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Chidambara Raja; P, Karthikeyan; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A.; M, Ramu

    2018-05-01

    Most of the thermal design systems involve two phase materials and analysis of such systems requires detailed understanding of the thermal characteristics of the two phase material. This article aimed to develop geometry dependent unit cell approach model by considering the effects of all primary parameters (conductivity ratio and concentration) and secondary parameters (geometry, contact resistance, natural convection, Knudsen and radiation) for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of two-phase materials. The analytical equations have been formulated based on isotherm approach for 2-D and 3-D spatially periodic medium. The developed models are validated with standard models and suited for all kind of operating conditions. The results have shown substantial improvement compared to the existing models and are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Energy recovery from solid waste. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A systems analysis of energy recovery from solid waste which demonstrates the feasibility of several processes for converting solid waste to an energy form is presented. The social, legal, environmental, and political factors are considered and recommendations made in regard to legislation and policy. A technical and economic evaluation of available and developing energy-recovery processes is given with emphasis on thermal decomposition and biodegradation. A pyrolysis process is suggested. The use of prepared solid waste as a fuel supplemental to coal is considered to be the most economic process for recovery of energy from solid waste. Markets are discussed with suggestions for improving market conditions and for developing market stability. A decision procedure is given to aid a community in deciding on its options in dealing with solid waste.

  18. The Reading Wars and Reading Recovery: What Educators, Families, and Taxpayers Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Pamela; Rodes, Deborah R.; Lipsitz, Kay L.

    2017-01-01

    Reading Recovery, a meaning-based reading program designed for young children at risk of reading failure, is widely implemented across the United States. We discuss the recent Reading Recovery $45 million four-year i3-funded scaleup study that was designed to "cover the expansion of Reading Recovery around the U.S." (May, Sirinides,…

  19. A warm thermal enclave in the late Pleistocene of the south-eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Russell, Dale A; Rich, Fredrick J; Schneider, Vincent; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    2009-05-01

    Physical and biological evidence supports the probable existence of an enclave of relatively warm climate located between the Southern Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean in the United States during the Last Glacial Maximum. The region supported a mosaic of forest and prairie habitats inhabited by a "Floridian" ice-age biota. Plant and vertebrate remains suggest an ecological gradient towards Cape Hatteras (35 degreesN) wherein forests tended to replace prairies, and browsing proboscideans tended to replace grazing proboscideans. Beyond 35 degreesN, warm waters of the Gulf Stream were deflected towards the central Atlantic, and a cold-facies biota replaced "Floridian" biota on the Atlantic coastal plain. Because of niche diversity and relatively benign climate, biodiversity may have been greater in the south-eastern thermal enclave than in other unglaciated areas of North America. However, the impact of terminal Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions may also have been shorter and more severe in the enclave than further north. A comparison with biotic changes that occurred in North America approximately 55 million years (ma) ago at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum suggests that similar processes of change took place under both ice-house and greenhouse climates.

  20. Waste heat recovery on multiple low-speed reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhew, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    With rising fuel costs, energy conservation has taken on added significance. Installation of Waste Heat Recovery Units (WHRU) on gas turbines is one method used in the past to reduce gas plant fuel consumption. More recently, waste heat recovery on multiple reciprocating compressor engines has also been identified as having energy conservation potential. This paper reviews the development and implementation of a Waste Heat Recovery Unit (WHRU) for multiple low speed engines at the Katy Gas Plant. WHRU's for these engines should be differentiated from high speed engines and gas turbines in that low speed engines produce low frequency, highmore » amplitude pulsating exhaust. The design of a waste heat system must take this potentially destructive pulsation into account. At Katy, the pulsation forces were measured at high amplitude frequencies and then used to design structural stiffness into the various components of the WHRU to minimize vibration and improve system reliability.« less

  1. Evaluation of New Thermally Conductive Geopolymer in Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Matěj; Uhlík, Jan; Nosek, Jaroslav; Lachman, Vladimír; Hladký, Radim; Franěk, Jan; Brož, Milan

    This paper describes an evaluation of a newly developed thermally conductive geopolymer (TCG), consisting of a mixture of sodium silicate and carbon micro-particles. The TCG is intended to be used as a component of high temperature energy storage (HTTES) to improve its thermal diffusivity. Energy storage is crucial for both ecological and economical sustainability. HTTES plays a vital role in solar energy technologies and in waste heat recovery. The most advanced HTTES technologies are based on phase change materials or molten salts, but suffer with economic and technological limitations. Rock or concrete HTTES are cheaper, but they have low thermal conductivity without incorporation of TCG. It was observed that TCG is stable up to 400 °C. The thermal conductivity was measured in range of 20-23 W m-1 K-1. The effect of TCG was tested by heating a granite block with an artificial fissure. One half of the fissure was filled with TCG and the other with ballotini. 28 thermometers, 5 dilatometers and strain sensors were installed on the block. The heat transport experiment was evaluated with COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  2. 46 CFR 108.557 - Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements... OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.557 Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements. (a) The launching appliance for a free-fall lifeboat must be designed and...

  3. 46 CFR 108.557 - Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements... OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.557 Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements. (a) The launching appliance for a free-fall lifeboat must be designed and...

  4. 78 FR 54735 - National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... recovery, and their stories provide hope to those struggling to break free from addiction. During National... prevent addiction, give hope to everyone still struggling with this disease, and celebrate all those moving along the life-saving path to recovery. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United...

  5. Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Rapid Resistive Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    thermal inactivation research. However, the research conducted to support this thesis utilizes the B.a. Sterne strain which is used in livestock vaccines...methodology conducted for this research including hard surface recovery, thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores, and the rapid resistive heating...to 500°C range but again, many of the thermal inactivation studies were conducted in the 350 to 2000°C range. Sample plots will be discussed in

  6. Effect of Freezing, Thermal Pasteurization, and Hydrostatic Pressure on Fractionation and Folate Recovery in Egg Yolk.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Nassim; Pouliot, Yves; House, James D; Doyen, Alain

    2017-09-06

    In this study, the impact of pasteurization and freezing of raw material, as performed at a commercial scale, on egg yolk fractionation and folate recovery was assessed. Freezing induced denaturation of the lipoproteins in egg yolk, which prevented further fractionation of the yolk. Thermal pasteurization of egg yolk at 61.1 °C for 3.5 min as well as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (400 MPa for 5 min) did not change (p < 0.05) the composition of egg yolk or yolk fractions after their recovery by centrifugation. Expressed as dry matter, folate in pasteurized yolk was measured to be 599 μg/100 g, while its concentration reached 1969.7 μg/100 g for pasteurized granule and 1902.5 μg/100 g for HHP-treated granule. Folate was not detected in plasma, emphasizing the complete separation of yolk folate into granule. Further, we studied the effect of HHP on different dilutions of egg yolk, which were then fractionated. Egg yolk was diluted with water at different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10, 25, and 50%), HHP-treated at 400 MPa for 5 min, and centrifuged. Characterization of the compositions of the separated granule and plasma followed. Folate was stable under the HHP conditions used. However, HHP caused separation of folate from the yolk structure into water-soluble plasma. After HHP processing, the amount of folate detected in the plasma fraction was significantly (p < 0.05) higher (1434.9 μg/100 g) in the 25% diluted samples but was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in HHP-treated granule samples. Native sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis results showed that phosvitin, α-livetin, and apovitellenin VIa were the proteins most resistant to HHP. This study confirms that dilution of egg yolk before HHP treatment can significantly (p < 0.05) change the composition of granule and plasma fractions after centrifugal fractionation of egg yolk.

  7. Key Planning Factors for Recovery from a Radiological Terrorism Incident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    United States, Health Phys. 82(5), 591–608. Bromet E.J. (2012). Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster, J Radiol Prot. 2012 Mar; 32(1...Recovery Planning Tools: Recommendations for Developing Regional Disaster Recovery Plans. Draft. Steinhausler, F. (2005), Chernobyl and Goiania Lessons for Responding to Radiological Terrorism. Health Phys. 89(5):566 –574

  8. Species recovery in the United States: Increasing the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act

    Treesearch

    Daniel M. Evans; Judy P. Che-Castaldo; Deborah Crouse; Frank W. Davis; Rebecca Epanchin-Niell; Curtis H. Flather; R. Kipp Frohlich; Dale D. Goble; Ya-Wei Li; Timothy D. Male; Lawrence L. Master; Matthew P. Moskwik; Maile C. Neel; Barry R. Noon; Camille Parmesan; Mark W. Schwartz; J. Michael Scott; Byron K. Williams

    2016-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) has succeeded in shielding hundreds of species from extinction and improving species recovery over time. However, recovery for most species officially protected by the ESA - i.e., listed species - has been harder to achieve than initially envisioned. Threats to species are persistent and pervasive, funding has been insufficient...

  9. On the Recovery Stress of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.; Halsmer, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recovery stress in shape memory alloys (SMAs), also known as blocking stress, is an important property generally obtained during heating under a dimensional constraint as the material undergoes the martensitic phase transformation. This property has been instinctively utilized in most SMA shape-setting procedures, and has been used in numerous applications such as fastening and joining, rock splitting, safety release mechanisms, reinforced composites, medical devices, and many other applications. The stress generation is also relevant to actuator applications where jamming loads (e.g., in case the actuator gets stuck and is impeded from moving) need to be determined for proper hardware sizing. Recovery stresses in many SMA systems have been shown to reach stresses in the order of 800 MPa, achieved via thermo-mechanical training such as pre-straining, heat treatments or other factors. With the advent of high strength, high temperature SMAs, recovery stress data has been rarely probed, and there is no information pertinent to the magnitudes of these stresses. Thus, the purpose of this work is to investigate the recovery stress capability of a precipitation strengthened, Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (at.) high temperature SMA in uniaxial tension and compression. This material has been shown to exhibit outstanding strength and stability during constant-stress, thermal cycling, but no data exists on constant-strain thermal cycling. Several training routines were implemented as part of this work including isothermal pre-straining, isobaric thermal cycling, and isothermal cyclic training routines. Regardless of the training method used, the recovery stress was characterized using constant-strain (strain-controlled condition) thermal cycling between the upper and lower cycle temperatures. Preliminary results indicate recovery stresses in excess of 1.5 GPa were obtained after a specific training routine. This stress magnitude is significantly higher than conventional NiTi stress

  10. URT-3 At Sea Recovery Operation with Bolden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-15

    Underway Recovery Test team members help secure the Orion boilerplate test vehicle in the well deck of the USS Anchorage during the first day of Underway Recovery Test 3 in the Pacific Ocean. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are conducting the recovery test to prepare for recovery of the Orion crew module on its return from a deep space mission. The test allows the teams to demonstrate and evaluate the recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in open waters. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is conducting the underway recovery tests. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

  11. URT-3 At Sea Recovery Operation with Bolden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-15

    The Orion boilerplate test vehicle floats in the Pacific Ocean near the USS Anchorage during Underway Recovery Test 3. U.S. Navy divers and other recovery team members in two Zodiac boats attach tether lines to Orion. Other recovery team members are nearby in two rigid hull inflatable boats. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are conducting the recovery test to prepare for recovery of the Orion crew module on its return from a deep space mission. The test allows the teams to demonstrate and evaluate the recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in open waters. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is conducting the underway recovery tests. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

  12. Prospective gas turbine and combined-cycle units for power engineering (a Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2013-02-01

    The modern state of technology for making gas turbines around the world and heat-recovery combined-cycle units constructed on their basis are considered. The progress achieved in this field by Siemens, Mitsubishi, General Electric, and Alstom is analyzed, and the objectives these companies set forth for themselves for the near and more distant future are discussed. The 375-MW gas turbine unit with an efficiency of 40% produced by Siemens, which is presently the largest one, is subjected to a detailed analysis. The main specific features of this turbine are that the gas turbine unit's hot-path components have purely air cooling, due to which the installation has enhanced maneuverability. The single-shaft combined-cycle plant constructed on the basis of this turbine has a capacity of 570 MW and efficiency higher than 60%. Programs adopted by different companies for development of new-generation gas turbine units firing synthesis gas and fitted with low-emission combustion chambers and new cooling systems are considered. Concepts of rotor blades for new gas turbine units with improved thermal barrier coatings and composite blades different parts of which are made of materials selected in accordance with the conditions of their operation are discussed.

  13. Thermal rejuvenation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, Junji; Yamada, Rui; Wakeda, Masato; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2017-12-01

    Structural rejuvenation in metallic glasses by a thermal process (i.e. through recovery annealing) was investigated experimentally and theoretically for various alloy compositions. An increase in the potential energy, a decrease in the density, and a change in the local structure as well as mechanical softening were observed after thermal rejuvenation. Two parameters, one related to the annealing temperature, Ta/Tg, and the other related to the cooling rate during the recovery annealing process, Vc/Vi, were proposed to evaluate the rejuvenation phenomena. A rejuvenation map was constructed using these two parameters. Since the thermal history of metallic glasses is reset above 1.2Tg, accompanied by a change in the local structure, it is essential that the condition of Ta/Tg ≥ 1.2 is satisfied during annealing. The glassy structure transforms into a more disordered state with the decomposition of icosahedral short-range order within this temperature range. Therefore, a new glassy structure (rejuvenation) depending on the subsequent quenching rate is generated. Partial rejuvenation also occurs in a Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass when annealing is performed at a low temperature (Ta/Tg 1.07) followed by rapid cooling. This behavior probably originates from disordering in the weakly bonded (loosely packed) region. This study provides a novel approach to improving the mechanical properties of metallic glasses by controlling their glassy structure.

  14. Carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery performance according to the literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olea, Ricardo A.

    2017-07-17

    IntroductionThe need to increase the efficiency of oil recovery and environmental concerns are bringing to prominence the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a tertiary recovery agent. Assessment of the impact of flooding with CO2 all eligible reservoirs in the United States not yet undergoing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) requires making the best possible use of the experience gained in 40 years of applications. Review of the publicly available literature has located relevant CO2-EOR information for 53 units (fields, reservoirs, pilot areas) in the United States and 17 abroad.As the world simultaneously faces an increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and a higher demand for fossil fuels, the CO2-EOR process continues to gain popularity for its efficiency as a tertiary recovery agent and for the potential for having some CO2 trapped in the subsurface as an unintended consequence of the enhanced production (Advanced Resources International and Melzer Consulting, 2009). More extensive application of CO2-EOR worldwide, however, is not making it significantly easier to predict the exact outcome of the CO2 flooding in new reservoirs. The standard approach to examine and manage risks is to analyze the intended target by conducting laboratory work, running simulation models, and, finally, gaining field experience with a pilot test. This approach, though, is not always possible. For example, assessment of the potential of CO2-EOR at the national level in a vast country such as the United States requires making forecasts based on information already available.Although many studies are proprietary, the published literature has provided reviews of CO2-EOR projects. Yet, there is always interest in updating reports and analyzing the information under new perspectives. Brock and Bryan (1989) described results obtained during the earlier days of CO2-EOR from 1972 to 1987. Most of the recovery predictions, however, were based on intended injections of 30 percent the size of

  15. URT-3 At Sea Recovery Operation with Bolden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-15

    The Orion boilerplate test vehicle is in the water-filled well deck of the USS Anchorage during the first day of Underway Recovery Test 3 in the Pacific Ocean. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are conducting the recovery test to prepare for recovery of the Orion crew module on its return from a deep space mission. The test allows the teams to demonstrate and evaluate the recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in open waters. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is conducting the underway recovery tests. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

  16. URT-3 At Sea Recovery Operation with Bolden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-15

    The Orion boilerplate test vehicle is secured in the well deck of the USS Anchorage during the first day of Underway Recovery Test 3 in the Pacific Ocean. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are conducting the recovery test to prepare for recovery of the Orion crew module on its return from a deep space mission. The test allows the teams to demonstrate and evaluate the recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in open waters. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is conducting the underway recovery tests. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

  17. Multi-allergen Quantitation and the Impact of Thermal Treatment in Industry-Processed Baked Goods by ELISA and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parker, Christine H; Khuda, Sefat E; Pereira, Marion; Ross, Mark M; Fu, Tong-Jen; Fan, Xuebin; Wu, Yan; Williams, Kristina M; DeVries, Jonathan; Pulvermacher, Brian; Bedford, Binaifer; Zhang, Xi; Jackson, Lauren S

    2015-12-16

    Undeclared food allergens account for 30-40% of food recalls in the United States. Compliance with ingredient labeling regulations and the implementation of effective manufacturing allergen control plans require the use of reliable methods for allergen detection and quantitation in complex food products. The objectives of this work were to (1) produce industry-processed model foods incurred with egg, milk, and peanut allergens, (2) compare analytical method performance for allergen quantitation in thermally processed bakery products, and (3) determine the effects of thermal treatment on allergen detection. Control and allergen-incurred cereal bars and muffins were formulated in a pilot-scale industry processing facility. Quantitation of egg, milk, and peanut in incurred baked goods was compared at various processing stages using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits and a novel multi-allergen liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) method. Thermal processing was determined to negatively affect the recovery and quantitation of egg, milk, and peanut to different extents depending on the allergen, matrix, and analytical test method. The Morinaga ELISA and LC-MS/MS quantitative methods reported the highest recovery across all monitored allergens, whereas the ELISA Systems, Neogen BioKits, Neogen Veratox, and R-Biopharm ELISA Kits underperformed in the determination of allergen content of industry-processed bakery products.

  18. Study of thermal energy storage using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weast, T. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of fluid bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in waste heat recovery applications is assessed by analysis of two selected conceptual systems, the rotary cement kiln and the electric arc furnace. It is shown that the inclusion of TES in the energy recovery system requires that the difference in off-peak and on-peak energy rates be large enough so that the value of the recovered energy exceeds the value of the stored energy by a wide enough margin to offset parasitic power and thermal losses. Escalation of on-peak energy rates due to fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  19. MORICE--new technology for mechanical oil recovery in ice infested waters.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hans V; Mullin, Joseph V

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical oil recovery in ice infested waters (MORICE) was initiated in 1995 to develop technology for the recovery of oil spills in ice. It has been a multinational effort involving Norwegian, Canadian, American and German organizations and researchers. Through a stepwise approach with the development organized in six separate phases, laboratory tests and field experiments have been conducted to study various ideas and concepts, and to refine the ideas that were considered to have the best potential for removing oil in ice. Put together in one unit, these concepts included ice processing equipment and two alternative oil recovery units installed on a work platform. In January 2002, the final oil and ice testing with MORICE concepts was conducted at the Ohmsett test facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. The unit has been referred to as a harbor version to indicate the size and operating conditions, but the concepts could be scaled up to increase the capacity of oil and ice processing. For heavier ice conditions it would also be necessary to increase the overall strength.

  20. Instruments for measuring mental health recovery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J; O'Connell, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-12-01

    Persons in recovery, providers, and policymakers alike are advocating for recovery-oriented mental health care, with the promotion of recovery becoming a prominent feature of mental health policy in the United States and internationally. One step toward creating a recovery-oriented system of care is to use recovery-oriented outcome measures. Numerous instruments have been developed to assess progress towards mental health recovery. This review identifies instruments of mental health recovery and evaluates the appropriateness of their use including their psychometric properties, ease of administration, and service-user involvement in their development. A literature search using the Medline and Psych-INFO databases was conducted, identifying 21 instruments for potential inclusion in this review, of which thirteen met inclusion criteria. Results suggest only three instruments (25%) have had their psychometric properties assessed in three or more unique samples of participants. Ease of administration varied between instruments, and for the majority of instruments, development included service user involvement. This review updates and expands previous reviews of instruments to assess mental health recovery. As mental health care continues to transform to a recovery-oriented model of service delivery, this review may facilitate selection of appropriate assessments of mental health recovery for systems to use in evaluating and improving the care they provide. © 2013.

  1. Thermal Control System Automation Project (TCSAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Thermal Control System Automation Project (TCSAP). Topics covered include the assembly of the External Thermal Control System (ETCS); the ETCS functional schematic; the baseline Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR), including the development of a knowledge based system (KBS) for application of rule based reasoning to the SSF ETCS; TCSAP software architecture; the High Fidelity Simulator architecture; the TCSAP Runtime Object Database (RODB) data flow; KBS functional architecture and logic flow; TCSAP growth and evolution; and TCSAP relationships.

  2. Thermal design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. R.; Vaniman, J. L.; Patterson, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal protection systems (TPS) to meet the quick turnaround and low cost required for reuse of the solid rocket booster (SRB) hardware. The TPS development considered the ease of application, changing ascent/reentry environments, and the problem of cleaning the residual insulation upon recovery. A sprayable ablator TPS material was developed. The challenges involved in design and development of this thermal system are discussed.

  3. International Space Station United States Laboratory Module Water Recovery Management Subsystem Verification from Flight 5A to Stage ULF2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Labuda, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system comprises of seven subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), Vacuum System (VS), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), and Waste Management (WM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the United States (U.S.) Laboratory Module WRM design and detailed element methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase of the U.S. Laboratory Module prior to launch and the Qualification of all of the modification kits added to it from Flight 5A up and including Stage ULF2.

  4. The use of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) principles in Scottish orthopaedic units--an implementation and follow-up at 1 year, 2010-2011: a report from the Musculoskeletal Audit, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nicholas B; McDonald, David; Campbell, Jane; Smith, Richard D; Carey, A Kate; Johnston, Ian G; James, Kate R; Breusch, Steffen J

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether a nationally guided programme can lead to more widespread implementation of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), a well-established optimised care pathway for lower limb arthroplasty. In 2010, National Services Scotland's Musculoskeletal Audit was asked to perform a 'snapshot' audit of the current peri-operative management of patients undergoing total hip and knee arthroplasty in all 22 Scottish orthopaedic units with an identical follow-up audit in 2011 after input and support from the national steering group. Audit 1 and audit 2 involved 1,345 and 1,278 patients, respectively. The number of Scottish units that developed an ERAS programme increased from 8 (36 %) to 15 (68 %). Units that included more ERAS patients had earlier mobilisation rates (146/474, 36 % ERAS patients mobilised same day vs. 34/873, 4 % non-ERAS; n = 22 units, r = 0.55, p = 0.008) and shorter post-operative length of stay (median 4 days vs. ERAS, 5 days non-ERAS, n = 22 units, r = -0.64, p = 0.001). ERAS knee arthroplasty patients had lower blood transfusion rates (5/205, 2 % vs. 51/399, 13 %, n = 22 units, r = -0.62, p = 0.002). Units that restricted the use of IV fluids post-operatively had higher early mobilisation rates (n = 22 units, r = 0.48, p = 0.03) and shorter post-operative length of stay (n = 22 units, r = -0.56, p = 0.007). Reduced use of patient-controlled analgesia was also associated with earlier mobilisation (n = 22 units, r = 0.49, p = 0.02) and shorter length of stay (n = 22 units, r = -0.39, p = 0.07). Urinary catheterisation rates also dropped from 468/1,345 (35 %) in 2010 to 337/1,278 (26 %) in 2011 (n = 22 units, z = 2.19, p = 0.03). A clinically guided and nationally supported process has proven highly successful in achieving a further uptake of enhanced recovery principles after lower limb arthroplasty in Scotland, which has resulted in clinical benefits to patients and reduced length of hospital stay.

  5. Evaluation of an expert system for fault detection, isolation, and recovery in the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Crow, Judith

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore issues in the specification, verification, and validation of artificial intelligence (AI) based software, using a prototype fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) system for the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). They use this system as a vehicle for exploring issues in the semantics of C-Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS)-style rule-based languages, the verification of properties relating to safety and reliability, and the static and dynamic analysis of knowledge based systems. This analysis reveals errors and shortcomings in the MMU FDIR system and raises a number of issues concerning software engineering in CLIPs. The authors came to realize that the MMU FDIR system does not conform to conventional definitions of AI software, despite the fact that it was intended and indeed presented as an AI system. The authors discuss this apparent disparity and related questions such as the role of AI techniques in space and aircraft operations and the suitability of CLIPS for critical applications.

  6. The use of thermal imaging to assess the effectiveness of ice massage and cold-water immersion as methods for supporting post-exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jakub Grzegorz; Krasowska, Ilona; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Reaburn, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) and ice massage (IM) are commonly used treatments to prevent the delay onset of muscle soreness (DOMS); however, little is known on their relative benefits and effectiveness to lower tissue temperature. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of IM and CMI on tissue temperature and potential benefit to preventing DOMS. The research encompassed 36 subjects divided into three groups of twelve depending on the form of recovery: ice massage (IM), cold-water immersion (CWI), or passive recovery (PAS). All the participants were asked to jump as high as possible from a full squat for one minute. Thermal imaging was conducted at rest, immediately following the exercise, immediately after the trial, following the recovery treatment, and after 30min of rest. Their pain levels were assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). After applying the selected method for supporting recovery, the LA level decreased by 4.25mmol/L in the IM group, and by 4.96mmol/L in the CWI group (IM vs. CWI p>0.05). The 2.75mmol/L decrease in lactate concentration in the PAS group was significantly lower than in the other groups (IM vs. PAS p<0.05/ CWI vs. PAS p<0.01). In both groups, Tsk after 30min was significantly lower (ΔTsk~0.5°C) than at rest (p<0.05). In turn, Tsk in the PAS group returned to the resting values (p>0.05). Seventy-two hours after the exercise, a clear decrease in discomfort was observed in the IM and CWI groups compared to the PAS group. The two applied treatments have proven to be effective both in utilizing lactate and preventing DOMS. Depending on training requirements, we recommend the use of IM when athletes experience localized muscle fatigue. One the other hand, CWI is recommended in situations of global or generalized muscle injury or fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  8. Effects of mixed-method cooling on recovery of medium-fast bowling performance in hot conditions on consecutive days.

    PubMed

    Minett, Geoffrey M; Duffield, Rob; Kellett, Aaron; Portus, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined physiological and performance effects of cooling on recovery of medium-fast bowlers in the heat. Eight, medium-fast bowlers completed two randomised trials, involving two sessions completed on consecutive days (Session 1: 10-overs and Session 2: 4-overs) in 31 ± 3°C and 55 ± 17% relative humidity. Recovery interventions were administered for 20 min (mixed-method cooling vs. control) after Session 1. Measures included bowling performance (ball speed, accuracy, run-up speeds), physical demands (global positioning system, counter-movement jump), physiological (heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, sweat loss), biochemical (creatine kinase, C-reactive protein) and perceptual variables (perceived exertion, thermal sensation, muscle soreness). Mean ball speed was higher after cooling in Session 2 (118.9 ± 8.1 vs. 115.5 ± 8.6 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.001; d = 0.67), reducing declines in ball speed between sessions (0.24 vs. -3.18 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.03; d = 1.80). Large effects indicated higher accuracy in Session 2 after cooling (46.0 ± 11.2 vs. 39.4 ± 8.6 arbitrary units [AU]; P = 0.13; d = 0.93) without affecting total run-up speed (19.0 ± 3.1 vs. 19.0 ± 2.5 km · h⁻¹; P = 0.97; d = 0.01). Cooling reduced core temperature, skin temperature and thermal sensation throughout the intervention (P = 0.001-0.05; d = 1.31-5.78) and attenuated creatine kinase (P = 0.04; d = 0.56) and muscle soreness at 24-h (P = 0.03; d = 2.05). Accordingly, mixed-method cooling can reduce thermal strain after a 10-over spell and improve markers of muscular damage and discomfort alongside maintained medium-fast bowling performance on consecutive days in hot conditions.

  9. Thermally Activated Composite with Two-Way and Multi-Shape Memory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Basit, Abdul; L’Hostis, Gildas; Pac, Marie José; Durand, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The use of shape memory polymer composites is growing rapidly in smart structure applications. In this work, an active asymmetric composite called “controlled behavior composite material (CBCM)” is used as shape memory polymer composite. The programming and the corresponding initial fixity of the composite structure is obtained during a bending test, by heating CBCM above thermal glass transition temperature of the used Epoxy polymer. The shape memory properties of these composites are investigated by a bending test. Three types of recoveries are conducted, two classical recovery tests: unconstrained recovery and constrained recovery, and a new test of partial recovery under load. During recovery, high recovery displacement and force are produced that enables the composite to perform strong two-way actuations along with multi-shape memory effect. The recovery force confirms full recovery with two-way actuation even under a high load. This unique property of CBCM is characterized by the recovered mechanical work. PMID:28788316

  10. Prospects for energy recovery during hydrothermal and biological processing of waste biomass.

    PubMed

    Gerber Van Doren, Léda; Posmanik, Roy; Bicalho, Felipe A; Tester, Jefferson W; Sills, Deborah L

    2017-02-01

    Thermochemical and biological processes represent promising technologies for converting wet biomasses, such as animal manure, organic waste, or algae, to energy. To convert biomass to energy and bio-chemicals in an economical manner, internal energy recovery should be maximized to reduce the use of external heat and power. In this study, two conversion pathways that couple hydrothermal liquefaction with anaerobic digestion or catalytic hydrothermal gasification were compared. Each of these platforms is followed by two alternative processes for gas utilization: 1) combined heat and power; and 2) combustion in a boiler. Pinch analysis was applied to integrate thermal streams among unit processes and improve the overall system efficiency. A techno-economic analysis was conducted to compare the feasibility of the four modeled scenarios under different market conditions. Our results show that a systems approach designed to recover internal heat and power can reduce external energy demands and increase the overall process sustainability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  12. Economical photovoltaic power generation with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three designs for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and thermal energy are analyzed. The objective of these converters is to increase the electric and thermal output for each photovoltaic array so as to lower the cell cost relative to the amount of energy delivered. An analysis of the economical aspects of conversion by photovoltaic cells with heat recovery is carried out in terms of hypothetical examples. Thus, it is shown that the original cost of say $40,000 per generated kilowat can be reduced to $572.00 per kilowatt by increasing the original electric output of 1 kW to 10 kW in electricity and 60 kW in thermal energy. The newly derived specific cost is only 1.4 percent of the original one. It is expected that a cost reduction of roughly 2% of the present specific cost per kilowatt will greatly stimulate public acceptance of photovoltaic terrestrial conversion to electricity.

  13. 26 CFR 301.7426-2 - Recovery of damages in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in the case of negligence), or the sum of— (1) Actual, direct economic damages as defined in § 301... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recovery of damages in certain cases. 301.7426... the United States § 301.7426-2 Recovery of damages in certain cases. (a) In general. In addition to...

  14. Experimental studies of thermal preparation of internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaukhov, N. N.; Merdanov, Sh M.; V, Konev V.; Borodin, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    In conditions of autonomous functioning of road construction machines, it becomes necessary to use its internal sources. This can be done by using a heat recovery system of an internal combustion engine (ICE). For this purpose, it is proposed to use heat accumulators that accumulate heat of the internal combustion engine during the operation of the machine. Experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the efficiency of using the proposed pre-start thermal preparation system, which combines a regular system based on liquid diesel fuel heaters and an ICE heat recovery system. As a result, the stages of operation of the preheating thermal preparation system, mathematical models and the dependence of the temperature change of the antifreeze at the exit from the internal combustion engine on the warm-up time are determined.

  15. IMPROVEMENTS IN THE THERMAL NEUTRON CALIBRATION UNIT, TNF2, AT LNMRI/IRD.

    PubMed

    Astuto, A; Fernandes, S S; Patrão, K C S; Fonseca, E S; Pereira, W W; Lopes, R T

    2018-02-21

    The standard thermal neutron flux unit, TNF2, in the Brazilian National Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory was rebuilt. Fluence is still achieved by moderating of four 241Am-Be sources with 0.6 TBq each. The facility was again simulated and redesigned with graphite core and paraffin added graphite blocks surrounding it. Simulations using the MCNPX code on different geometric arrangements of moderator materials and neutron sources were performed. The resulting neutron fluence quality in terms of intensity, spectrum and cadmium ratio was evaluated. After this step, the system was assembled based on the results obtained from the simulations and measurements were performed with equipment existing in LNMRI/IRD and by simulated equipment. This work focuses on the characterization of a central chamber point and external points around the TNF2 in terms of neutron spectrum, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H*(10). This system was validated with spectra measurements, fluence and H*(10) to ensure traceability.

  16. Effect of storage temperature on survival and recovery of thermal and extrusion injured Escherichia coli K-12 in whey protein concentrate and corn meal.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Onwulata, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported inactivation of Escherichia coli populations in corn product (CP) and whey protein product (WPP) extruded at different temperatures. However, information on the effect of storage temperatures on injured bacterial populations was not addressed. In this study, the effect of storage temperatures on the survival and recovery of thermal death time (TDT) disks and extrusion injured E. coli populations in CP and WPP was investigated. CP and WPP inoculated with E. coli bacteria at 7.8 log(10) CFU/g were conveyed separately into the extruder with a series 6300 digital type T-35 twin screw volumetric feeder set at a speed of 600 rpm and extruded at 35°C, 55°C, 75°C, and 95°C, or thermally treated with TDT disks submerged into water bath set at 35°C, 55°C, 75°C, and 95°C for 120 s. Populations of surviving bacteria including injured cells in all treated samples were determined immediately and every day for 5 days, and up to 10 days for untreated samples during storage at 5°C, 10°C, and 23°C. TDT disks treatment at 35°C and 55°C did not cause significant changes in the population of the surviving bacteria including injured populations. Extrusion treatment at 35°C and 55°C led to significant (p<0.05) reduction of E. coli populations in WPP as opposed to CP. The injured populations among the surviving E. coli cells in CP and WPP extruded at all temperatures tested were inactivated during storage. Population of E. coli inactivated in samples extruded at 75°C was significantly (p<0.05) different than 55°C during storage. Percent injured population could not be determined in samples extruded at 95°C due to absence of colony forming units on the agar plates. The results of this study showed that further inactivation of the injured populations occurred during storage at 5°C for 5 days suggesting the need for immediate storage of 75°C extruded CP and WPP at 5°C for at least 24 h to enhance their microbial safety.

  17. An Improved Model for a Once-through Counter-Cross-Flow Waste Heat Recovery Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    RAnkine Cycle Energy Recovery (RACER) system. As conceived, the RACER system will be an unfired waste heat recovery system designed to convert waste... heater to arrive at the feedwater inlet. For the given geometry and flow conditions, the model will calcu- late the water inlet temperature consistent...when given feedwater inlet temperature, steam outlet tempera- ture, operating pressure, inlet and outlet gas conditions and gas flow rate. In this

  18. Aquifer thermal-energy-storage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzle, W. J.; Lecroy, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    A model aquifer was constructed to simulate the operation of a full size aquifer. Instrumentation to evaluate the water flow and thermal energy storage was installed in the system. Numerous runs injecting warm water into a preconditioned uniform aquifer were made. Energy recoveries were evaluated and agree with comparisons of other limited available data. The model aquifer is simulated in a swimming pool, 18 ft by 4 ft, which was filled with sand. Temperature probes were installed in the system. A 2 ft thick aquifer is confined by two layers of polyethylene. Both the aquifer and overburden are sand. Four well configurations are available. The system description and original tests, including energy recovery, are described.

  19. Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research.

    PubMed

    Engert, Veronika; Merla, Arcangelo; Grant, Joshua A; Cardone, Daniela; Tusche, Anita; Singer, Tania

    2014-01-01

    High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints). Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol) in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers) did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle.

  20. Microbial enhanced oil recovery: Entering the log phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technology has advanced internationally since 1980 from a laboratory-based evaluation of microbial processes to field applications. In order to adequately support the decline in oil production in certain areas, research on cost-effective technologies such as microbial enhanced oil recovery processes must focus on both near-term and long-term applications. Many marginal wells are desperately in need of an inexpensive improved oil recovery technology today that can assist producers in order to prevent their abandonment. Microbial enhanced waterflooding technology has also been shown to be an economically feasible technology in the United States. Complementary environmental research andmore » development will also be required to address any potential environmental impacts of microbial processes. In 1995 at this conference, the goal is to further document and promote microbial processes for improved oil recovery and related technology for solving environmental problems.« less

  1. Fluid and electrolyte needs for training, competition, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Shirreffs, Susan M; Sawka, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    Fluids and electrolytes (sodium) are consumed by athletes, or recommended to athletes, for a number of reasons, before, during, and after exercise. These reasons are generally to sustain total body water, as deficits (hypohydration) will increase cardiovascular and thermal strain and degrade aerobic performance. Vigorous exercise and warm/hot weather induce sweat production, which contains both water and electrolytes. Daily water (4-10 L) and sodium (3500-7000 mg) losses in active athletes during hot weather exposure can induce water and electrolyte deficits. Both water and sodium need to be replaced to re-establish "normal" total body water (euhydration). This replacement can be by normal eating and drinking practices if there is no urgency for recovery. But if rapid recovery (<24 h) is desired or severe hypohydration (>5% body mass) is encountered, aggressive drinking of fluids and consuming electrolytes should be encouraged to facilitate recovery for subsequent competition.

  2. 77 FR 123 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling party: Waste Management Recycling & Disposal Services of California, Inc., dba Bradley Landfill & Recycling Center. The settlement requires the settling party to pay a total of $185,734 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling party pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  3. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  4. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  5. Thermal history of Bakken shale in Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnold, W.D. Jr.; Lefever, R.D.; Crashell, J.J.

    1989-12-01

    Stratigraphic and thermal conductivity data were combined to analyze the thermostratigraphy of the Williston basin. The present thermostratigraphy is characterized by geothermal gradients of the order of 60 mK/m in the Cenozoic and Mesozoic units, and 30 mK/m in the Paleozoic units. The differences in geothermal gradients are due to differences in thermal conductivities between the shale-dominated Mesozoic and Cenozoic units and the carbonate-dominated Paleozoic units. Subsidence and compaction rates were calculated for the basin and were used to determine models for time vs. depth and time vs. thermal conductivity relationships for the basin. The time/depth and time/conductivity relationships includemore » factors accounting for thermal conductivity changes due to compaction, cementation, and temperature. The thermal history of the Bakken shale, a primary oil source rock in the Williston basin, was determined using four different models, and values for Lopatin's time-temperature index (TTI) were calculated for each model. The first model uses a geothermal gradient calculated from bottom-hole temperature data, the second uses present-day thermostratigraphy, the third uses the thermostratigraphic relationship determined in this analysis, and the fourth modifies the third by including assumed variations in continental heat flow. The thermal histories and the calculated TTI values differ markedly among the models with TTI values differing by a factor of about two between some models.« less

  6. Unconventional slowing down of electronic recovery in photoexcited charge-ordered La 1/3Sr 2/3FeO 3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yi; Hoffman, Jason; Rowland, Clare E.

    Ordered electronic phases are intimately related to emerging phenomena such as high Tc superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. The coupling of electronic charge with other degrees of freedom such as lattice and spin are of central interest in correlated systems. Their correlations have been intensively studied from femtosecond to picosecond time scales, while the dynamics of ordered electronic phases beyond nanoseconds are usually assumed to follow a trivia thermally driven recovery. Here, we report an unusual slowing down of electronic phases across a first-order phase transition, far beyond thermal relaxation time. Following optical excitation, the recovery time of both transient opticalmore » reflectivity and x-ray diffraction intensity from a charge-ordered superstructure in a La 1/3Sr 2/3FeO 3 thin film increases by orders of magnitude longer than the independently measured lattice cooling time when the sample temperature approaches the phase transition temperature. The combined experimental and theoretical investigations show that the slowing down of electronic recovery corresponds to the pseudo-critical dynamics that originates from magnetic interactions close to a weakly first-order phase transition. As a result, this extraordinary long electronic recovery time exemplifies an interplay of ordered electronic phases with magnetism beyond thermal processes in correlated systems.« less

  7. Unconventional slowing down of electronic recovery in photoexcited charge-ordered La 1/3Sr 2/3FeO 3

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yi; Hoffman, Jason; Rowland, Clare E.; ...

    2018-05-04

    Ordered electronic phases are intimately related to emerging phenomena such as high Tc superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. The coupling of electronic charge with other degrees of freedom such as lattice and spin are of central interest in correlated systems. Their correlations have been intensively studied from femtosecond to picosecond time scales, while the dynamics of ordered electronic phases beyond nanoseconds are usually assumed to follow a trivia thermally driven recovery. Here, we report an unusual slowing down of electronic phases across a first-order phase transition, far beyond thermal relaxation time. Following optical excitation, the recovery time of both transient opticalmore » reflectivity and x-ray diffraction intensity from a charge-ordered superstructure in a La 1/3Sr 2/3FeO 3 thin film increases by orders of magnitude longer than the independently measured lattice cooling time when the sample temperature approaches the phase transition temperature. The combined experimental and theoretical investigations show that the slowing down of electronic recovery corresponds to the pseudo-critical dynamics that originates from magnetic interactions close to a weakly first-order phase transition. As a result, this extraordinary long electronic recovery time exemplifies an interplay of ordered electronic phases with magnetism beyond thermal processes in correlated systems.« less

  8. The magnitude and phasing of variations in climate and ocean carbonate chemistry during Eocene Thermal Maximum 2: Insights into C cycle feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, D. T.; Zeebe, R. E.; Hoenisch, B.; Zachos, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The early Eocene features several large abrupt global warming events ("hyperthermals") that were characterized by negative δ13C excursions suggesting isotopically `light' carbon release to the atmosphere. The most prominent events, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), present an opportunity to study the operation of carbon cycle processes, and in particular negative feedbacks in the carbon cycle, such as silicate and carbonate weathering. Here we study sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean carbonate chemistry changes across ETM2, by measuring Mg/Ca, B/Ca, and δ13C in planktic foraminifera at two IODP sites (1209 in the Pacific and 1265 in the S. Atlantic). We observe a 2-3°C increase in SST in the Pacific and a 2°C increase in the Atlantic. The observed decrease in planktic B/Ca at both sites is consistent with increased atmospheric pCO2, and when scaled to the 0.3 pH unit decrease estimated for the PETM by Penman et al., 2014, the estimated pH decrease during the ETM2 is 0.15. However, reconstructions of the δ13C recovery during the ETM2 show that it is more rapid than models have been able to successfully simulate. We compare these new proxy data to LOSCAR model output, to assess whether the rapid δ13C recovery was a result of: 1) changes in the type and δ13C of weathered carbonates or δ13C of buried organic carbon during the recovery, 2) a one-time event of isotopically `light' carbon burial during the recovery phase, or 3) enhanced burial of `light' carbon due to background orbital eccentricity forcing during the recovery. Our preliminary results suggest that the phasing of the drop in the B/Ca relative to δ13C during recovery is due to the burial of organic carbon.

  9. Accelerated recovery from sevoflurane anesthesia with isocapnic hyperpnoea.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Minkovich, Leonid; Friedman, Zeev; Fedorko, Ludvik; Beattie, W Scott; Fisher, Joseph A

    2008-02-01

    Isocapnic hyperpnoea (IH) reduces recovery time from isoflurane anesthesia in animals and humans. We studied the effect of IH on the emergence profile of sevoflurane-anesthetized patients by comparing postoperative recovery variables in patients administered IH (IH group) to those recovered in the customary fashion (control group). We enrolled 30 ASA I-III patients undergoing elective gynecological surgery. Induction and maintenance of anesthesia were standardized with a protocol consisting of fentanyl, propofol, rocuronium, and sevoflurane in air/O2. Patients were randomly assigned to control (C) or IH groups at the end of the surgery. We recorded time intervals from discontinuing sevoflurane to recovery milestones. Time to tracheal extubation was much shorter in the IH group compared with group C (6.2 +/- 2.1 vs 12.3 +/- 3.8 min, respectively, P < 0.01). The IH group also had shorter times to initiation of spontaneous ventilation (4.2 +/- 1.7 vs 6.5 +/- 3.8 min, P = 0.047), eye opening (5.5 +/- 1.4 vs 13.3 +/- 4.4 min, P < 0.01), bispectral index value >75 (3.9 +/- 1.1 vs 8.8 +/- 3.7 min, P < 0.01), leaving operating room (7.7 +/- 2.0 vs 15.3 +/- 3.4 min, P < 0.01), and eligibility for postanesthetic care unit discharge (67.2 +/- 19.3 vs 90.6 +/- 20.0 min, P < 0.01). IH accelerates recovery from sevoflurane anesthesia and shortens operating room and postanesthetic care unit stay.

  10. School District Crisis Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Plans - United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Brenda; Chen, Brenda; Brener, Nancy; Kruger, Judy; Krishna, Nevin; Renard, Paul; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Avchen, Rachel Nonkin

    2016-09-16

    The unique characteristics of children dictate the need for school-based all-hazards response plans during natural disasters, emerging infectious diseases, and terrorism (1-3). Schools are a critical community institution serving a vulnerable population that must be accounted for in public health preparedness plans; prepared schools are adopting policies and plans for crisis preparedness, response, and recovery (2-4). The importance of having such plans in place is underscored by the development of a new Healthy People 2020 objective (PREP-5) to "increase the percentage of school districts that require schools to include specific topics in their crisis preparedness, response, and recovery plans" (5). Because decisions about such plans are usually made at the school district level, it is important to examine district-level policies and practices. Although previous reports have provided national estimates of the percentage of districts with policies and practices in place (6), these estimates have not been analyzed by U.S. Census region* and urbanicity.(†) Using data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS), this report examines policies and practices related to school district preparedness, response, and recovery. In general, districts in the Midwest were less likely to require schools to include specific topics in their crisis preparedness plans than districts in the Northeast and South. Urban districts tended to be more likely than nonurban districts to require specific topics in school preparedness plans. Southern districts tended to be more likely than districts in other regions to engage with partners when developing plans. No differences in district collaboration (with the exception of local fire department engagement) were observed by level of urbanicity. School-based preparedness planning needs to be coordinated with interdisciplinary community partners to achieve Healthy People 2020 PREP-5 objectives for this vulnerable population.

  11. Using the tidal model of mental health recovery to plan primary health care for women in residential substance abuse recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Brenda B

    2010-09-01

    Women currently are 30% of the substance abuse recovery population in North America and have gender specific treatment needs as they enter the difficult work of recovery. Important among women's specific needs as they enter recovery is the need for a focus on primary health care. Few models designed to guide the provision of health care for this population are available in the literature. The Tidal Model of Mental Health Recovery and Reclamation is based on the concept of nursing as "caring with" persons in the experience of distress. Given the emphasis in this model on developing a partnership between caregiver and client, it is especially appropriate for women in recovery for substance abuse. The Tidal Model, integrated with the United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services' CSAT model for comprehensive alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse treatment, is used to guide planning for delivery of primary health care in a residential women's substance abuse recovery center in the Midwest. This article describes the Tidal Model, and identifies how the model can improve the delivery of primary care to women in residential substance abuse treatment. Strategies for implementation of the model are proposed. Evaluation and outcome criteria are identified.

  12. Vaporization or Chemical Reaction: Which controls the fate of contaminants treated by in situ thermal remediation?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation technologies, which includes steam enhanced extraction, electrical resistance heating, and thermal conductive heating, have been developed based on technologies employed by the enhanced oil recovery industry. Although mobilization and/or volatilization of con...

  13. Program THEK energy production units of average power and using thermal conversion of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General studies undertaken by the C.N.R.S. in the field of solar power plants have generated the problem of building energy production units in the medium range of electrical power, in the order of 100 kW. Among the possible solutions, the principle of the use of distributed heliothermal converters has been selected as being, with the current status of things, the most advantageous solution. This principle consists of obtaining the conversion of concentrated radiation into heat by using a series of heliothermal conversion modules scattered over the ground; the produced heat is collected by a heat-carrying fluid circulating inside a thermal loop leading to a device for both regulation and storage.

  14. Optimal control of Formula One car energy recovery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limebeer, D. J. N.; Perantoni, G.; Rao, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    The utility of orthogonal collocation methods in the solution of optimal control problems relating to Formula One racing is demonstrated. These methods can be used to optimise driver controls such as the steering, braking and throttle usage, and to optimise vehicle parameters such as the aerodynamic down force and mass distributions. Of particular interest is the optimal usage of energy recovery systems (ERSs). Contemporary kinetic energy recovery systems are studied and compared with future hybrid kinetic and thermal/heat ERSs known as ERS-K and ERS-H, respectively. It is demonstrated that these systems, when properly controlled, can produce contemporary lap time using approximately two-thirds of the fuel required by earlier generation (2013 and prior) vehicles.

  15. Recovery collapse coincident with ongoing carbon cycle perturbations following the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsios, E.; Bottjer, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Permian-Triassic mass extinction, the largest extinction of the Phanerozoic, is attributed to volcanic outgassing from the Siberian Traps and the resulting climate change. Ongoing volcanism in the Early Triassic is implicated for continued carbon cycle instability following the initial event, reflected in large inorganic carbon isotope excursions throughout the 5 Mya interval. Recent paleoecological studies have shown that timing of recovery from the extinction in the Early Triassic is highly complex, differing between regions, with documented cases of "early" recovery in some environments. The importance of specific environmental factors, such as oxygen levels and sea surface temperatures, in aiding or hindering recovery following the extinction is the topic of ongoing study. Here we present an ecological survey of marine benthic communities from the Lower Triassic Blacktail Creek outcrop of the Dinwoody Formation, correlated bed-for-bed with inorganic carbon isotope values. We observe incipient recovery as communities show increasing richness and evenness throughout the section, followed by a `collapse' with a return of high dominance, low richness fauna coincident with large δ13Ccarb shifts. We observe a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of δ13Ccarb excursions and benthic community complexity over a stratigraphic section, implying a shared causal mechanism acting at the local scale. The globally correlatable nature of these observed carbon isotope shifts, as well as an absence of lithologic evidence for oxygen limitation, points to thermal stress brought on by pulses of volcanism as the shared cause between recovery collapse and carbon cycle perturbations. We propose that the "early" recovery at Blacktail Creek was truncated by recurrent greenhouse gas induced thermal spikes, highlighting the interplay of local and global environmental conditions in expediting or hindering Early Triassic recovery.

  16. Developing a vacuum thermal stripping - acid absorption process for ammonia recovery from anaerobic digester effluent.

    PubMed

    Ukwuani, Anayo T; Tao, Wendong

    2016-12-01

    To prevent acetoclastic methanogens from ammonia inhibition in anaerobic digestion of protein-rich substrates, ammonia needs to be removed or recovered from digestate. This paper presents an innovative ammonia recovery process that couples vacuum thermal stripping with acid absorption. Ammonia is stripped out of digestate boiling at a temperature below the normal boiling point due to vacuum. Stripped ammonia is absorbed to a sulfuric acid solution, forming ammonium sulfate crystals as a marketable product. Three common types of digestate were found to have boiling point temperature-vacuum curves similar to water. Seven combinations of boiling temperature and vacuum (50 °C 16.6 kPa, 58 °C 20.0 kPa, 65 °C 25.1 kPa, 70 °C 33.6 kPa, 80 °C 54.0 kPa, 90 °C 74.2 kPa, and 100 °C 101.3 kPa) were tested for batch stripping of ammonia in dairy manure digestate. 93.3-99.9% of ammonia was stripped in 3 h. The Lewis-Whitman model fitted ammonia stripping process well. Ammonia mass transfer coefficient was significantly higher at boiling temperature 65-100 °C and vacuum pressure 25.1-101.3 kPa than 50-58 °C and 16.6-20.0 kPa. The low ammonia saturation concentrations (0-24 mg N/L) suggested a large driving force to strip ammonia. The optimum boiling point temperature - vacuum pressure for ammonia recovery in a recirculation line of a mesophilic digester was 65 °C and 25.1 kPa, at which the ammonia mass transfer coefficient was as high as 37.3 mm/h. Installation of a demister and liquid trap could avoid negative effects of higher stripping temperature and stronger vacuum on formation of ammonium sulfate crystals. Pilot tests demonstrated that high-purity ammonium sulfate crystals could be produced by controlling sulfuric acid content and maintaining acid solution saturated with ammonium sulfate. Although volatile organic compounds such as cyclohexene were found in the final acid solutions, no volatile organic compounds were found in the recovered

  17. 76 FR 47566 - Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery... limited waiver of the Buy American requirements of section 1605 of the Recovery Act under the authority of Section 1605(b)(2), (iron, steel, and the relevant manufactured goods are not produced in the United...

  18. 76 FR 47568 - Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery... limited waiver of the Buy American requirements of section 1605 of the Recovery Act under the authority of Section 1605(b)(2), (iron, steel, and the relevant manufactured goods are not produced in the United...

  19. Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery with Heat Pipe-Based Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, F. P.; Martins, Jorge; Hançer, Esra; Antunes, Nuno; Gonçalves, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    Heat pipe (HP)-based heat exchangers can be used for very low resistance heat transfer between a hot and a cold source. Their operating temperature depends solely on the boiling point of their working fluid, so it is possible to control the heat transfer temperature if the pressure of the HP can be adjusted. This is the case of the variable conductance HPs (VCHP). This solution makes VCHPs ideal for the passive control of thermoelectric generator (TEG) temperature levels. The present work assesses, both theoretically and experimentally, the merit of the aforementioned approach. A thermal and electrical model of a TEG with VCHP assist is proposed. Experimental results obtained with a proof of concept prototype attached to a small single-cylinder engine are presented and used to validate the model. It was found that the HP heat exchanger indeed enables the TEG to operate at a constant, optimal temperature in a passive and safe way, and with a minimal overall thermal resistance, under part load, it effectively reduces the active module area without deprecating the temperature level of the active modules.

  20. Research on optimization of combustion efficiency of thermal power unit based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiongyang

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve the economic performance and reduce pollutant emissions of thermal power units, the characteristics of neural network in establishing boiler combustion model are analyzed based on the analysis of the main factors affecting boiler efficiency by using orthogonal method. In addition, on the basis of this model, the genetic algorithm is used to find the best control amount of the furnace combustion in a certain working condition. Through the genetic algorithm based on real number encoding and roulette selection is concluded: the best control quantity at a condition of furnace combustion can be combined with the boiler combustion system model for neural network training. The precision of the neural network model is further improved, and the basic work is laid for the research of the whole boiler combustion optimization system.

  1. Thermal stabilization of neutron Larmor diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, T.; Tralmer, F.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the design of a support unit for the radio frequency (RF) coils of a Larmor diffractometer (LD) eliminating fluctuations of the Larmor phase resulting from thermal expansion of the support structures. The key component defining the spacing between the RF coils is a Zerodur bar with a very low thermal expansion coefficient (α = 7 × 10-8 K-1). This support unit will allow for LD measurements on the 10-6 accuracy level even if the ambient temperature is fluctuating.

  2. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm).

  3. Surviving ICU: Stories of recovery.

    PubMed

    Ewens, Beverley A; Hendricks, Joyce M; Sundin, Deborah

    2018-02-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate stories of recovery through the lens of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Survival from ICUs is increasing, as are associated physical and psychological complications. Despite the significant impact on survivors, there is inadequate support provision in Australia and world-wide for this population. An interpretive biographical approach of intensive care survivors' experiences of recovery. Data were collected during 2014-2015 from diaries, face to face interviews, memos and field notes. Six participants diarized for 3 months commencing 2 months after hospital discharge. At 5 months, participants were interviewed about the content of their diaries and symbols and signifiers in them to create a shared meaning. Analysis of diaries and interviews were undertaken using two frameworks to identify themes throughout participants' stories and provides a unique portrait of recovery through their individual lens. Participants considered their lives had irreparably changed and yet felt unsupported by a healthcare system that had "saved" them. This view through their lens identified turmoil, which existed between their surface and inner worlds as they struggled to conform to what recovery "should be". The novel biographical methods provided a safe and creative way to reveal survivors' inner thoughts and feelings. Participants' considered creating their stories supported their recovery process and in particular enabled them to reflect on their progress. Findings from this study may lead to increased awareness among health care providers about problems survivors face and improved support services more broadly, based on frameworks appropriate for this population. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 76 FR 30145 - Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery... limited waiver of the Buy American requirements of section 1605 of the Recovery Act under the authority of Section 1605(b)(2), (iron, steel, or the relevant manufactured goods are not produced in the United States...

  5. 75 FR 52323 - Nationwide Categorical Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Waivers Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery... limited waiver of the Buy American requirements of section 1605 of the Recovery Act under the authority of Section 1605(b)(2) (iron, steel, and the relevant manufactured goods are not produced in the United States...

  6. Development of lead-acid battery thermal management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, W. C.; McKinney, B. L.; Mrotek, E. N.; Weinlein, C. E.

    The design and construction of thermal management systems developed for battery packs supplied for field service units are discussed. Thermal management on the module and pack levels is addressed, describing experimental results. A recently developed thermal management system is described.

  7. Physiological and Psychological Responses during Exercise and Recovery in a Cold Environment Is Gender-Related Rather Than Fabric-Related

    PubMed Central

    Cernych, Margarita; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Eimantas, Nerijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Brazaitis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated gender-specific effects of two types of undergarments on exercise-induced physiological and psychological stress and subsequent recovery in cold conditions for male and female participants. Ten healthy men and eleven healthy women (25.0 ± 1.5 versus 23.4 ± 1.2 years old, respectively) completed the experimental session twice with two different types of undergarments: polyester or merino wool leggings and long-sleeve tops; specifically, merino fabric had greater thermal resistance and water absorbency, and less water vapor as well as air permeability than polyester. Experimental sessions involved performing 1 h of exercise on a cycle ergometer at 8°C ambient temperature and 55% relative humidity, holding at 70–80 revolutions per minute and 60% of each participant’s predetermined maximal power output (assessed by maximal oxygen uptake test), followed by 1 h recovery in the same environment. Every 5 min during exercise and every 10 min during recovery, rectal temperature, heart rate, subjective ratings for thermal, shivering/sweating and clothing wetness sensations, and clothing next-to-skin and outer side surface temperature and humidity on the chest, back and thigh were recorded. All participants experienced high physiological stress (assessed by physiological strain index) during exercise. No significant gender differences were found in core temperature or heart rate changes during exercise, but women cooled down faster during recovery. Next-to-skin humidity was similar between genders and different garment sets during exercise and recovery, but such temperatures at the chest during exercise and at the thigh during exercise and recovery were lower in women with both sets of garments. Subjective thermal sensations were similar in all cases. In the last 20 min of cycling, women started to feel wetter than men (P < 0.05) for both garment sets. Shivering was reported as stronger in women in the last 10 min of recovery. Most of the changes in the

  8. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-06-21

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability-inherent to their nanoporosity-are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery.

  9. Unsustainable Wind Turbine Blade Disposal Practices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Tejeda, Katerin; Turcotte, David A; Pike, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    Finding ways to manage the waste from the expected high number of wind turbine blades in need of disposal is crucial to harvest wind energy in a truly sustainable manner. Landfilling is the most cost-effective disposal method in the United States, but it imposes significant environmental impacts. Thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes allow for some energy and/or material recovery, but they also carry potential negative externalities. This article explores the main economic and environmental issues with various wind turbine blade disposal methods. We argue for the necessity of policy intervention that encourages industry to develop better technologies to make wind turbine blade disposal sustainable, both environmentally and economically. We present some of the technological initiatives being researched, such as the use of bio-derived resins and thermoplastic composites in the manufacturing process of the blades.

  10. Exploring the Use of Thermal Infrared Imaging in Human Stress Research

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Joshua A.; Cardone, Daniela; Tusche, Anita; Singer, Tania

    2014-01-01

    High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints). Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol) in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers) did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle. PMID:24675709

  11. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  12. Colour centre recovery in yttria-stabilised zirconia: photo-induced versus thermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Touati, Nadia; Binet, Laurent; Lelong, Gérald; Guillaumet, Maxime; Beuneu, François

    2018-05-01

    The photo-annealing of colour centres in yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy upon UV-ray or laser light illumination, and compared to thermal annealing. Stable hole centres (HCs) were produced in as-grown YSZ single crystals by UV-ray irradiation at room temperature (RT). The HCs produced by 200-MeV Au ion irradiation, as well as the F+-type centres (? centres involving oxygen vacancies) were left unchanged upon UV illumination. In contrast, a significant photo-annealing of the latter point defects was achieved in 1.4-MeV electron-irradiated YSZ by 553-nm laser light irradiation at RT. Almost complete photo-bleaching was achieved by laser irradiation inside the absorption band of ? centres centred at a wavelength 550 nm. Thermal annealing of these colour centres was also followed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy showing full bleaching at 523 K. Colour-centre evolutions by photo-induced and thermally activated processes are discussed on the basis of charge exchange processes between point defects.

  13. EVALUATION OF MEDIA FOR RECOVERY OF AEROSOLIZED BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disease transmission by airborne bacteria is well known.Bacterial burden in indoor air is estimated by sampling the air and estimating Colony Forming Unites (CFU) using a variety of media.In this study, the recovery of bacteria, after aerosolization in an aerosol chamber, and emp...

  14. Design and evaluation of a fault-tolerant multiprocessor using hardware recovery blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Shin, K. G.

    1982-01-01

    A fault-tolerant multiprocessor with a rollback recovery mechanism is discussed. The rollback mechanism is based on the hardware recovery block which is a hardware equivalent to the software recovery block. The hardware recovery block is constructed by consecutive state-save operations and several state-save units in every processor and memory module. When a fault is detected, the multiprocessor reconfigures itself to replace the faulty component and then the process originally assigned to the faulty component retreats to one of the previously saved states in order to resume fault-free execution. A mathematical model is proposed to calculate both the coverage of multi-step rollback recovery and the risk of restart. A performance evaluation in terms of task execution time is also presented.

  15. The heat is on... thermal epiglottitis as a late presentation of airway steam injury.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Hamrick, Justin T; Mai, Christine L; Berkowitz, Ivor; Tunkel, David

    2014-02-01

    Thermal epiglottitis is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease. Diagnosis requires a thorough history and high clinical level of suspicion, particularly in children. Thermal epiglottitis from steam inhalation can have a slow onset without oropharyngeal signs of thermal injury, findings that can hide the clinical diagnosis. Our aim was to review the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of thermal epiglottitis and the challenges involved in diagnosis and management of this form of atypical epiglottitis. We describe the case of a 22-month-old male presenting to the pediatric emergency department after a scald burn from steam and boiling water resulting in 12% body surface area burns to his chin, chest, and shoulder, with no obvious oropharyngeal or neck injuries. At the time of presentation, he was afebrile and well appearing. Six hours after the injury, he was sitting in the "tripod position," drooling, with pooled saliva in his mouth and inspiratory stridor. Intubation in the operating room using conventional direct laryngoscopy was not successful and he was intubated using an operative endoscope. Laryngoscopy demonstrated thermal epiglottitis. A tracheostomy was performed to secure the airway, and he was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. He was discharged home and decannulated 4 weeks later, when airway endoscopy showed complete recovery with normal airway structures. A thorough history and physical examination together with a high level of suspicion and aggressive, collaborative airway management is vital in preventing catastrophic airway obstruction in atypical forms of epiglottitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tensile deformation and recovery kinetics of Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.F.; Mayo, W.E.; Weissmann, S.

    1992-07-01

    The effect of carbon content, grain size and thermal history on the deformation behavior of nickel-base Alloy 690 has been investigated. Carbon content effects the yield strength of Mill Annealed (MA) material, but has no effect in Thermally Treated (TT) material. Also, no effect of carbon content on the workhardening rate was seen in either material. There was an effect of grain size as expected. An interesting aspect of this work showed that TT material consistently has a slightly higher Young's modulus than the MA. As deformation moves into the plastic regime, the TT material displays a two stage hardeningmore » process. This consists of a low workhardening rate (n = 0.05), followed by a transition to the more normal workhardening rate (n=0.35). The MA material, on the other hand, does not exhibit the low n region. This unusual deformation behavior is attributable to the presence of planar slip which initiates at the grain boundary over the strain range of 0.2 to 0.7%. These observations are useful to explain the unexpectedly fast strain relaxation behavior seen in this alloy. The recovery kinetics of the alloy have also been studied. Rapid recovery with an activation energy of approximately 5.3 kj/mol occurs when the deformation level is low. This was attributed to a grain boundary self diffusion process. At higher strain levels, recovery is much slower with an activation energy of approximately 14 kJ/mol. This process was attributable to bulk diffusion. Based on TEM and X-ray rocking curve measurements, these results have been explained.« less

  17. 46 CFR 108.570 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.570 Rescue boat... possible time. (c) If the rescue boat is one of the unit's survival craft, the rescue boat must also be as... approval series 160.170, instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. (d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat...

  18. 46 CFR 108.570 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.570 Rescue boat... possible time. (c) If the rescue boat is one of the unit's survival craft, the rescue boat must also be as... approval series 160.170, instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. (d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat...

  19. 46 CFR 108.570 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.570 Rescue boat... possible time. (c) If the rescue boat is one of the unit's survival craft, the rescue boat must also be as... approval series 160.170, instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. (d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat...

  20. 46 CFR 108.570 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.570 Rescue boat... possible time. (c) If the rescue boat is one of the unit's survival craft, the rescue boat must also be as... approval series 160.170, instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. (d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat...

  1. 46 CFR 108.570 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.570 Rescue boat... possible time. (c) If the rescue boat is one of the unit's survival craft, the rescue boat must also be as... approval series 160.170, instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. (d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat...

  2. Thermal oil recovery method using self-contained windelectric sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsky, A. A.; Korolyov, I. A.

    2018-05-01

    The paper reviews challenges associated with questions of efficiency of thermal methods of impact on productive oil strata. The concept of using electrothermal complexes with WEG power supply for the indicated purposes was proposed and justified, their operating principles, main advantages and disadvantages, as well as a schematechnical solution for the implementation of the intensification of oil extraction, were considered. A mathematical model for finding the operating characteristics of WEG is presented and its main energy parameters are determined. The adequacy of the mathematical model is confirmed by laboratory simulation stand tests with nominal parameters.

  3. Energy recovery from solid waste. Volume 2: Technical report. [pyrolysis and biodegradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Dalton, C.

    1975-01-01

    A systems analysis of energy recovery from solid waste demonstrates the feasibility of several current processes for converting solid waste to an energy form. The social, legal, environmental, and political factors are considered in depth with recommendations made in regard to new legislation and policy. Biodegradation and thermal decomposition are the two areas of disposal that are considered with emphasis on thermal decomposition. A technical and economic evaluation of a number of available and developing energy-recovery processes is given. Based on present technical capabilities, use of prepared solid waste as a fuel supplemental to coal seems to be the most economic process by which to recover energy from solid waste. Markets are considered in detail with suggestions given for improving market conditions and for developing market stability. A decision procedure is given to aid a community in deciding on its options in dealing with solid waste, and a new pyrolysis process is suggested. An application of the methods of this study are applied to Houston, Texas.

  4. Design, performance, and analysis of an aquifer thermal-energy-storage experiment using the doublet-well configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Melville, J. G.; Gueven, O.; Parr, A. D.

    1983-09-01

    In March 1980 Auburn University began a series of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) experiments using the doublet well configuration. The test site was in Mobile, Alabama. The objectives of the three experimental cycles were to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ATES concept, to identify and resolve operational problems, and to acquire a data base for developing and testing mathematical models. Pre-injection tests were performed and analyses of hydraulic, geochemical, and thermodynamic data were completed. Three injection-storage-recovery cycles had injection volumes of 25,402 m(3), 58,010 m(3), and 58,680 m(3) and average injection temperatures of 58.50C, 81.00C. and 79.00C, respectively. The first cycle injection began in February 1981 and the third cycle recovery was completed in November 1982. Attributable to the doublet well configuration no clogging of injection wells occurred. Energy recovery percentages based on recovery volumes equal to the injection volumes were 56, 45, and 42%. Thermal convection effects were observed. Aquifer nonhomogeneity, not detectable using standard aquifer testing procedures, was shown to reduce recovery efficiency.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Recovery and Storage of Strontium-90 Fueled Radioisotope Thermal Electric Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-01-22

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of recovery and storage for disposal of six strontium-90 (Sr-90) fueled radioisotope thermal electric generators (RTGs) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) proposed to recover and store six Sr-90 RTGs from the commercial sector as part of its Offsite-Source Recovery Project (OSRP). The OSRP focuses on the proactive recovery andmore » storage of unwanted radioactive sealed sources exceeding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits for Class C low-level waste (also known as Greater than Class C waste, or GTCC). In response to the events of September 11, 2001, NRC conducted a risk-based evaluation of potential vulnerabilities to terrorist threats involving NRC-licensed nuclear facilities and materials. NRC's evaluation concluded that possession of unwanted radioactive sealed sources with no disposal outlet presents a potential vulnerability (NRC 2002). In a November 25, 2003 letter to the manager of the NNSA's Los Alamos Site Office, the NRC Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response identified recovery of several Sr-90 RTGs as the highest priority and requested that DOE take whatever actions necessary to recovery these sources as soon as possible. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the offsite source recovery program evaluated in the SWEIS and a subsequent SA that evaluated a change to the approach of a portion of the recovery program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the Proposed Action and activities described in the previous SWEIS and SA analyses.« less

  6. Thermoacoustic refrigerators and engines comprising cascading stirling thermodynamic units

    DOEpatents

    Backhaus, Scott; Swift, Greg

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes a thermoacoustic assembly and method for improved efficiency. The assembly has a first stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator and at least one additional heat exchanger. The first stage Stirling thermal unit is serially coupled to a first end of a quarter wavelength long coupling tube. A second stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator, and at least one additional heat exchanger, is serially coupled to a second end of the quarter wavelength long coupling tube.

  7. On the Thermal Model of Transverse Flow of Unidirectional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang

    2002-01-01

    The thermal model for transverse heat flow of having single filament in a unit cell is extended. In this model, we proposed that two circular filaments in a unit cell of square packing array and obtained the transverse thermal conductivity of an unidirectional material.

  8. Measuring disaster recovery: bouncing back or reaching the counterfactual state?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoming; Ganapati, Emel; Ganapati, Sukumar

    2015-07-01

    How should one measure the recovery of a locale from a disaster? The measurement is crucial from a public policy and administration standpoint to determine which places should receive disaster assistance, and it affects the performance evaluation of disaster recovery programmes. This paper compares two approaches to measuring recovery: (i) bouncing back to pre-disaster conditions; and (ii) attaining the counterfactual state. The former centres on returning to normalcy following disaster-induced losses, whereas the latter focuses on attaining the state, using quasi-experimental design, which would have existed if the disaster had not occurred. Both are employed here to assess two housing recovery indicators (total new units and their valuations) in Hurricane Katrina-affected counties (rural and urban). The examination reveals significantly different outcomes for the two approaches: counties have not returned to their pre-disaster housing conditions, but they do exhibit counterfactual recovery. Moreover, rural counties may not be as vulnerable as assumed in the disaster recovery literature. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  9. Investigating the interactions of decentralized and centralized wastewater heat recovery systems.

    PubMed

    Sitzenfrei, Robert; Hillebrand, Sebastian; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    In the urban water cycle there are different sources for extracting energy. In addition to potential and chemical energy in the wastewater, thermal energy can also be recovered. Heat can be recovered from the wastewater with heat exchangers that are located decentralized and/or centralized at several locations throughout the system. It can be recovered directly at the source (e.g. in the showers and bathrooms), at building block level (e.g. warm water tanks collecting all grey water), in sewers or at the wastewater treatment plant. However, an uncoordinated installation of systems on such different levels can lead to competing technologies. To investigate these interactions, a modelling environment is set up, tested and calibrated based on continuous sewer temperature and flow measurements. With that approach different heat recovery scenarios on a household level (decentralized) and of in-sewer heat recovery (centralized) are investigated. A maximum performance drop of 40% for a centralized energy recovery system was estimated when all bathrooms are equipped with decentralized recovery systems. Therefore, the proposed modelling approach is suitable for testing different future conditions and to identify robust strategies for heat recovery systems from wastewater.

  10. Toward Two-Color Sub-Doppler Saturation Recovery Kinetics in CN (x, v = 0, J)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Forthomme, Damien; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory; Dagdigian, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Collision-induced rotational energy transfer among rotational levels of ground state CN (X 2σ+, v = 0) radicals has been probed by saturation recovery experiments, using high-resolution, polarized transient FM spectroscopy to probe the recovery of population and the decay of alignment following ns pulsed laser depletion of selected CN rotational levels. Despite the lack of Doppler selection in the pulsed depletion and the thermal distribution of collision velocities, the recovery kinetics are found to depend on the probed Doppler shift of the depleted signal. The observed Doppler-shift-dependent recovery rates are a measure of the velocity dependence of the inelastic cross sections, combined with the moderating effects of velocity-changing elastic collisions. New experiments are underway, in which the pulsed saturation is performed with sub-Doppler velocity selection. The time evolution of the spectral hole bleached in the initially thermal CN absorption spectrum can characterize speed-dependent inelastic collisions along with competing elastic velocity-changing collisions, all as a function of the initially bleached velocity group and rotational state. The initial time evolution of the depletion recovery spectrum can be compared to a stochastic model, using differential cross sections for elastic scattering as well as speed-dependent total inelastic cross sections, derived from ab initio scattering calculations. Progress to date will be reported. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  11. Adaptive management of large aquatic ecosystem recovery programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thom, Ronald; St Clair, Tom; Burns, Rebecca; Anderson, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive management (AM) is being employed in a number of programs in the United States to guide actions to restore aquatic ecosystems because these programs are both expensive and are faced with significant uncertainties. Many of these uncertainties are associated with prioritizing when, where, and what kind of actions are needed to meet the objectives of enhancing ecosystem services and recovering threatened and endangered species. We interviewed nine large-scale aquatic ecosystem restoration programs across the United States to document the lessons learned from implementing AM. In addition, we recorded information on ecological drivers (e.g., endangered fish species) for the program, and inferred how these drivers reflected more generic ecosystem services. Ecosystem services (e.g., genetic diversity, cultural heritage), albeit not explicit drivers, were either important to the recovery or enhancement of the drivers, or were additional benefits associated with actions to recover or enhance the program drivers. Implementing programs using AM lessons learned has apparently helped achieve better results regarding enhancing ecosystem services and restoring target species populations. The interviews yielded several recommendations. The science and AM program must be integrated into how the overall restoration program operates in order to gain understanding and support, and effectively inform management decision-making. Governance and decision-making varied based on its particular circumstances. Open communication within and among agency and stakeholder groups and extensive vetting lead up to decisions. It was important to have an internal agency staff member to implement the AM plan, and a clear designation of roles and responsibilities, and long-term commitment of other involved parties. The most important management questions and information needs must be identified up front. It was imperative to clearly identify, link and continually reinforce the essential

  12. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability—inherent to their nanoporosity—are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery. PMID:27327254

  13. Market potential of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery-a techno-economic model for Issaran oil field in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sunay; Guédez, Rafael; Laumert, Björn

    2017-06-01

    Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (S-EOR) is an advanced technique of using concentrated solar power (CSP) technology to generate steam and recover oil from maturing oil reservoirs. The generated steam is injected at high pressure and temperature into the reservoir wells to facilitate oil production. There are three common methods of steam injection in enhanced oil recovery - continuous steam injection, cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD). Conventionally, this steam is generated through natural gas (NG) fired boilers with associated greenhouse gas emissions. However, pilot projects in the USA (Coalinga, California) and Oman (Miraah, Amal) demonstrated the use of S-EOR to meet their steam requirements despite the intermittent nature of solar irradiation. Hence, conventional steam based EOR projects under the Sunbelt region can benefit from S-EOR with reduced operational expenditure (OPEX) and increased profitability in the long term, even with the initial investment required for solar equipment. S-EOR can be realized as an opportunity for countries not owning any natural gas resources to make them less energy dependent and less sensible to gas price fluctuations, and for countries owning natural gas resources to reduce their gas consumption and export it for a higher margin. In this study, firstly, the market potential of S-EOR was investigated worldwide by covering some of the major ongoing steam based EOR projects as well as future projects in pipeline. A multi-criteria analysis was performed to compare local conditions and requirements of all the oil fields based on a defined set of parameters. Secondly, a modelling approach for S-EOR was designed to identify cost reduction opportunities and optimum solar integration techniques, and the Issaran oil field in Egypt was selected for a case study to substantiate the approach. This modelling approach can be consulted to develop S-EOR projects for any steam flooding based oil

  14. Revisiting the thermal effect on shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qianhong, E-mail: zhou-qianhong@iapcm.ac.cn; Dong, Zhiwei; Yang, Wei

    2016-07-15

    Many researchers have investigated shock propagation in weakly ionized plasmas and observed the following anomalous effects: shock acceleration, shock recovery, shock weakening, shock spreading, and splitting. It was generally accepted that the thermal effect can explain most of the experimental results. However, little attention was paid to the shock recovery. In this paper, the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas is studied by fluid simulation. It is found that the shock acceleration, weakening, and splitting appear after it enters the plasma (thermal) region. The shock splits into two parts right after it leaves the thermal region. The distance betweenmore » the splitted shocks keeps decreasing until they recover to one. This paper can explain a whole set of features of the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas. It is also found that both the shock curvature and the splitting present the same photoacoustic deflection (PAD) signals, so they cannot be distinguished by the PAD experiments.« less

  15. Metallurgical recovery of metals from electronic waste: a review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jirang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2008-10-30

    Waste electric and electronic equipment, or electronic waste, has been taken into consideration not only by the government but also by the public due to their hazardous material contents. In the detailed literature survey, value distributions for different electronic waste samples were calculated. It is showed that the major economic driver for recycling of electronic waste is from the recovery of precious metals. The state of the art in recovery of precious metals from electronic waste by pyrometallurgical processing, hydrometallurgical processing, and biometallurgical processing are highlighted in the paper. Pyrometallurgical processing has been a traditional technology for recovery of precious metals from waste electronic equipment. However, state-of-the-art smelters are highly depended on investments. Recent research on recovery of energy from PC waste gives an example for using plastics in this waste stream. It indicates that thermal processing provides a feasible approach for recovery of energy from electronic waste if a comprehensive emission control system is installed. In the last decade, attentions have been removed from pyrometallurgical process to hydrometallurgical process for recovery of metals from electronic waste. In the paper, hydrometallurgical processing techniques including cyanide leaching, halide leaching, thiourea leaching, and thiosulfate leaching of precious metals are detailed. In order to develop an environmentally friendly technique for recovery of precious metals from electronic scrap, a critical comparison of main leaching methods is analyzed for both economic feasibility and environmental impact. It is believed that biotechnology has been one of the most promising technologies in metallurgical processing. Bioleaching has been used for recovery of precious metals and copper from ores for many years. However, limited research was carried out on the bioleaching of metals from electronic waste. In the review, initial researches on the

  16. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 82, quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This document consists of a list of projects supporting work on oil recovery programs. A publications list and index of companies and institutions is provided. The remaining portion of the document provides brief descriptions on projects in chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, resource assessment, and reservoir class field demonstrations.

  17. Uncertainty in Population Estimates for Endangered Animals and Improving the Recovery Process.

    PubMed

    Haines, Aaron M; Zak, Matthew; Hammond, Katie; Scott, J Michael; Goble, Dale D; Rachlow, Janet L

    2013-08-13

    United States recovery plans contain biological information for a species listed under the Endangered Species Act and specify recovery criteria to provide basis for species recovery. The objective of our study was to evaluate whether recovery plans provide uncertainty (e.g., variance) with estimates of population size. We reviewed all finalized recovery plans for listed terrestrial vertebrate species to record the following data: (1) if a current population size was given, (2) if a measure of uncertainty or variance was associated with current estimates of population size and (3) if population size was stipulated for recovery. We found that 59% of completed recovery plans specified a current population size, 14.5% specified a variance for the current population size estimate and 43% specified population size as a recovery criterion. More recent recovery plans reported more estimates of current population size, uncertainty and population size as a recovery criterion. Also, bird and mammal recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty compared to reptiles and amphibians. We suggest the use of calculating minimum detectable differences to improve confidence when delisting endangered animals and we identified incentives for individuals to get involved in recovery planning to improve access to quantitative data.

  18. New filtration system for efficient recovery of waterborne Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, M N S; Gad, J A; Riber, U; Kurtzhals, J A L; Enemark, H L

    2015-09-01

    To develop a filtration unit for efficient recovery of waterborne Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts ((oo-)cysts) in drinking water. This unit utilizes a metallic filter and an ultrasound transducer for eluting (oo-)cysts, with a fixed retentate backwash volume; approx. 400 μl. Changes in the viability was evaluated by seeding wild type (oo-)cysts (1 × 10(4)) followed by sonication for 5, 10, 20 or 40 s (five replicates for each period). Flow cytometry analysis showed negligible increase in the mortality of (oo-)cysts exposed to 5-10 s of sonication. Recovery rate was assessed by seeding ColorSeed(™) (10 replicates) into the filter unit followed by air backwash to a glass slide and counting of (oo-)cysts by epifluorescent microscopy. High recovery rates (mean ± SD) were found: 84·9% ± 4·8 for Giardia cysts and 70% ± 6·5 for Cryptosporidium oocysts. DNA of seeded wild type (oo-)cysts (1 × 10(2); 10 replicates) was successfully amplified using real-time PCR. The use of a metallic filter, sonication and 'air backwash' were key factors for creating a highly efficient system for recovery of apparently undamaged protozoa. This reagent-less system can be used for monitoring of parasite contamination in drinking water. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Weldability and Strength Recovery of NUCu-140 Advanced Naval Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Jason T.

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper-precipitation strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom-probe tomography (APT) analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT. The experimental naval steel known as NUCu-140 and an established naval steel HSLA-100 were subjected to stress-relief cracking (SRC) and hot-ductility testing to assess their relative cracking susceptibilities during the welding process and post weld heat treatment. NUCu-140 exhibited a longer time-to-failure (TTF) and a lower temperature of minimum TTF during SRC testing when compared to HSLA-100, indicating better resistance to SRC for the NUCu-140 steel. The

  20. Analysis of integrated photovoltaic-thermal systems using solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Yusoff, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    An integrated photovoltaic-thermal system using solar concentrators utilizes the solar radiation spectrum in the production of electrical and thermal energy. The electrical conversion efficiency of this system decreases with increasing solar cell temperature. Since a high operating temperature is desirable to maximize the quality of thermal output of the planned integrated system, a proper choice of the operating temperature for the unit cell is of vital importance. The analysis predicts performance characteristics of the unit cell by considering the dependence of the heat generation, the heat absorption and the heat transmission on the material properties of the unit cell structure.more » An analytical model has been developed to describe the heat transport phenomena occurring in the unit cell structure. The range of applicability of the one-dimensional and the two-dimensional models, which have closed-form solutions, has been demonstrated. Parametric and design studies point out the requirements for necessary good electrical and thermal performance. A procedure utilizing functional forms of component characteristics in the form of partial coefficients of the dependent variable has been developed to design and operate the integrated system to have a desirable value of the thermal to electrical output ratio both at design and operating modes.« less

  1. Analysis of the heavy oil production technology effectiveness using natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation method in reservoirs with varying initial water saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osnos, V. B.; Kuneevsky, V. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Saifullin, E. R.; Gainetdinov, A. V.; Vankov, Yu V.; Larionova, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The method of natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation (NTC HAR) in oil reservoirs is described. The analysis of the effectiveness of this method for oil reservoir heating with the values of water saturation from 0 to 0.5 units is conducted. As the test element Ashalchinskoye oil field is taken. CMG STARS software was used for calculations. Dynamics of cumulative production, recovery factor and specific energy consumption per 1 m3 of crude oil produced in the application of the heat exchanger with heat agent in cases of different initial water saturation are defined and presented as graphs.

  2. From Free to Free Market: Cost Recovery in Federally Funded Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, Margaret G.; Fogg, Thomas T.; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  3. Anaerobic digestion of stillage fractions - estimation of the potential for energy recovery in bioethanol plants.

    PubMed

    Drosg, B; Fuchs, W; Meixner, K; Waltenberger, R; Kirchmayr, R; Braun, R; Bochmann, G

    2013-01-01

    Stillage processing can require more than one third of the thermal energy demand of a dry-grind bioethanol production plant. Therefore, for every stillage fraction occurring in stillage processing the potential of energy recovery by anaerobic digestion (AD) was estimated. In the case of whole stillage up to 128% of the thermal energy demand in the process can be provided, so even an energetically self-sufficient bioethanol production process is possible. For wet cake the recovery potential of thermal energy is 57%, for thin stillage 41%, for syrup 40% and for the evaporation condensate 2.5%. Specific issues for establishing AD of stillage fractions are evaluated in detail; these are high nitrogen concentrations, digestate treatment and trace element supply. If animal feed is co-produced at the bioethanol plant and digestate fractions are to be reused as process water, a sufficient quality is necessary. Most interesting stillage fractions as substrates for AD are whole stillage, thin stillage and the evaporation condensate. For these fractions process details are presented.

  4. Potable water recovery for spacecraft application by electrolytic pretreatment/air evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    A process for the recovery of potable water from urine using electrolytic pretreatment followed by distillation in a closed-cycle air evaporator has been developed and tested. Both the electrolytic pretreatment unit and the air evaporation unit are six-person, flight-concept prototype, automated units. Significantly extended wick lifetimes have been achieved in the air evaporation unit using electrolytically pretreated, as opposed to chemically pretreated, urine feed. Parametric test data are presented on product water quality, wick life, process power, maintenance requirements, and expendable requirements.

  5. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Experimentally Shocked Anorthosite and Pyroxenite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Hoerz, F.; Christensen, P.; Lucey, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    We performed shock recovery experiments at JSC (17-63 GPa) on samples of Stillwater pyroxenite and anorthosite and acquired their thermal infrared spectra (3-50 micron) to investigate the degradation of spectral features at high pressures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Recovery from simulated sawn logs with sweep.

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Monserud; Dean L. Parry; Christine L. Todoroki

    2004-01-01

    A sawing simulator, AUTOSAW, was used to examine the effect of increasing sweep on lumber recovery. Sample material consisted of 51 logs from 22 western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. ) trees in western Oregon, United States. All knots on the 4.9-m logs were measured, mapped, and converted into 3-dimensional digital formats. The digital...

  7. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  8. Morphology of Thermally Degraded PU and Irradiated PE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Douglas; Gillen, Kenneth; Celina, Mathias; Assink, Roger

    2001-03-01

    Several 1H and 13C NMR techniques have been applied to study the morphology and chemical structure of thermally degraded polyurethane rubber and irradiated polyethylene cable insulation. The combination of heat and presence of air results in oxidation of the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene/isophorone diisocyanate polyurethane and the gel content increases. The oxidation is inhomogeneous: pristine regions remain with a length scale of approximately 20 nm. The morphology and oxidation products were characterized by 1H spin diffusion with 13C detection. In addition, dynamics were probed with 1H and 2D WISE experiments. Radiation of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation obeys anomalous aging behavior where lower temperature can result in a greater loss in ultimate tensile elongation. Annealing of the irradiated polyethylene allows significant recovery of mechanical properties. Analysis of 13C NMR data was used to study this "Lazarus effect" and the inverse temperature relationship. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  9. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States. Appendix, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Overview of improved oil recovery methods (enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods); Benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and List of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

  10. Recovery capital pathways: Modelling the components of recovery wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Cano, Ivan; Best, David; Edwards, Michael; Lehman, John

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, there has been recognition that recovery is a journey that involves the growth of recovery capital. Thus, recovery capital has become a commonly used term in addiction treatment and research yet its operationalization and measurement has been limited. Due to these limitations, there is little understanding of long-term recovery pathways and their clinical application. We used the data of 546 participants from eight different recovery residences spread across Florida, USA. We calculated internal consistency for recovery capital and wellbeing, then assessed their factor structure via confirmatory factor analysis. The relationships between time, recovery barriers and strengths, wellbeing and recovery capital, as well as the moderating effect of gender, were estimated using structural equations modelling. The proposed model obtained an acceptable fit (χ 2 (141, N=546)=533.642, p<0.001; CMIN/DF=3.785; CFI=0.915; TLI=0.896; RMSEA=0.071). Findings indicate a pathway to recovery capital that involves greater time in residence ('retention'), linked to an increase in meaningful activities and a reduction in barriers to recovery and unmet needs that, in turn, promote recovery capital and positive wellbeing. Gender differences were observed. We tested the pathways to recovery for residents in the recovery housing population. Our results have implications not only for retention as a predictor of sustained recovery and wellbeing but also for the importance of meaningful activities in promoting recovery capital and wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovery in soccer : part ii-recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, Mathieu; McCall, Alan; Carling, Chris; Legall, Franck; Berthoin, Serge; Dupont, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In the formerly published part I of this two-part review, we examined fatigue after soccer matchplay and recovery kinetics of physical performance, and cognitive, subjective and biological markers. To reduce the magnitude of fatigue and to accelerate the time to fully recover after completion, several recovery strategies are now used in professional soccer teams. During congested fixture schedules, recovery strategies are highly required to alleviate post-match fatigue, and then to regain performance faster and reduce the risk of injury. Fatigue following competition is multifactorial and mainly related to dehydration, glycogen depletion, muscle damage and mental fatigue. Recovery strategies should consequently be targeted against the major causes of fatigue. Strategies reviewed in part II of this article were nutritional intake, cold water immersion, sleeping, active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. Some strategies such as hydration, diet and sleep are effective in their ability to counteract the fatigue mechanisms. Providing milk drinks to players at the end of competition and a meal containing high-glycaemic index carbohydrate and protein within the hour following the match are effective in replenishing substrate stores and optimizing muscle-damage repair. Sleep is an essential part of recovery management. Sleep disturbance after a match is common and can negatively impact on the recovery process. Cold water immersion is effective during acute periods of match congestion in order to regain performance levels faster and repress the acute inflammatory process. Scientific evidence for other strategies reviewed in their ability to accelerate the return to the initial level of performance is still lacking. These include active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. While this does not mean that these strategies do not aid the recovery process, the protocols implemented up until

  12. Reestablishment of ion homeostasis during chill-coma recovery in the cricket Gryllus pennsylvanicus

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Williams, Caroline M.; Staples, James F.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    The time required to recover from cold-induced paralysis (chill-coma) is a common measure of insect cold tolerance used to test central questions in thermal biology and predict the effects of climate change on insect populations. The onset of chill-coma in the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus, Orthoptera: Gryllidae) is accompanied by a progressive drift of Na+ and water from the hemolymph to the gut, but the physiological mechanisms underlying recovery from chill-coma are not understood for any insect. Using a combination of gravimetric methods and atomic absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that recovery from chill-coma involves a reestablishment of hemolymph ion content and volume driven by removal of Na+ and water from the gut. Recovery is associated with a transient elevation of metabolic rate, the time span of which increases with increasing cold exposure duration and closely matches the duration of complete osmotic recovery. Thus, complete recovery from chill-coma is metabolically costly and encompasses a longer period than is required for the recovery of muscle potentials and movement. These findings provide evidence that physiological mechanisms of hemolymph ion content and volume regulation, such as ion-motive ATPase activity, are instrumental in chill-coma recovery and may underlie natural variation in insect cold tolerance. PMID:23184963

  13. Size Dependence of Residual Thermal Stresses in Micro Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors by Using Finite Element Unit Cell Model Including Strain Gradient Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W. G.; Xiong, C. A.; Wu, X. G.

    2013-11-01

    The residual thermal stresses induced by the high-temperature sintering process in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) are investigated by using a finite-element unit cell model, in which the strain gradient effect is considered. The numerical results show that the residual thermal stresses depend on the lateral margin length, the thickness ratio of the dielectrics layer to the electrode layer, and the MLCC size. At a given thickness ratio, as the MLCC size is scaled down, the peak shear stress reduces significantly and the normal stresses along the length and thickness directions change slightly with the decrease in the ceramic layer thickness t d as t d > 1 μm, but as t d < 1 μm, the normal stress components increase sharply with the increase in t d. Thus, the residual thermal stresses induced by the sintering process exhibit strong size effects and, therefore, the strain gradient effect should be taken into account in the design and evaluation of MLCC devices

  14. The Anexo in Northern California: An Alcoholics Anonymous-Based Recovery Residence in Latino Communities.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Victor; Pagano, Anna; Recarte, Carlos; Lee, Juliet P

    2017-01-01

    Our ethnographic study on help-seeking pathways of Latino immigrants in northern California reveals that they turn to anexos in their treatment and recovery quest. Anexos are linguistically- and culturally-specific recovery houses with origins in Mexico and Alcoholics Anonymous and a long history in Latino communities across the United States. Drawing on the findings of our study, we characterize the anexos and compare them to other recovery residences using National Alliance for Recovery Residences (NARR) criteria. The description and comparison reveal that anexos cannot be placed into a single NARR residence category. We discuss why this is the case.

  15. Acid Tar Lagoons: Management and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohers, Anna; Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    liquid state et sim. Because of lack of geological research caused by fragile limestone bedrock under the lagoon in combination with aggressive substance in the lagoon, waste management of this contaminated site became even more complicated. The main aim of this work is to present by analysis a new possibility of acid tarry-waste management thanks to the technique of thermal desorption as a method for acid tar processing, through which it is possible to gain only organic part; and a technology of Blowing Decomposition as a method for its consequent recovery. Thermal desorption process is an effective separation process through which is possible to split acid tarry material into matrix (soil, sediments) and organic contaminants (PCB and POPs compounds). The process is carried out through a mobile unit which is relocatable. The work also presents a relation between volume of de-contaminated matrix and organic compounds. In order to boost the efficiency in processing of acid tar waste through thermal desorption, the work will present possibility of application of innovative technology - method of Blowing Decomposition for recovering of organic matter into technological lubricating oil.

  16. Osmotic Heat Engine Using Thermally Responsive Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujiang; Wang, Xinbo; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Telalovic, Selvedin; Gnanou, Yves; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Hu, Xiao; Lai, Zhiping

    2017-08-15

    The osmotic heat engine (OHE) is a promising technology for converting low grade heat to electricity. Most of the existing studies have focused on thermolytic salt systems. Herein, for the first time, we proposed to use thermally responsive ionic liquids (TRIL) that have either an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) type of phase behavior as novel thermolytic osmotic agents. Closed-loop TRIL-OHEs were designed based on these unique phase behaviors to convert low grade heat to work or electricity. Experimental studies using two UCST-type TRILs, protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf 2 N]) and choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([choline][Tf 2 N]) showed that (1) the specific energy of the TRIL-OHE system could reach as high as 4.0 times that of the seawater and river water system, (2) the power density measured from a commercial FO membrane reached up to 2.3 W/m 2 , and (3) the overall energy efficiency reached up to 2.6% or 18% of the Carnot efficiency at no heat recovery and up to 10.5% or 71% of the Carnet efficiency at 70% heat recovery. All of these results clearly demonstrated the great potential of using TRILs as novel osmotic agents to design high efficient OHEs for recovery of low grade thermal energy to work or electricity.

  17. Variation in thermal tolerance and routine metabolism among spring- and stream-dwelling freshwater sculpins (Teleostei: Cottidae) of the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, S.J.; Haney, D.C.; Timmerman, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that some aquatic organisms may adapt by directional selection to limiting physical environmental conditions, yet empirical data are conflicting. We sought to test the assumption that sculpins (family Cottidae) inhabiting thermally stable springs of the southeastern United States differ in temperature tolerance and metabolism from populations inhabiting more thermally labile stream habitats. Spring populations of pygmy sculpins (Coitus pygmaeus) and Ozark sculpins (C. hypselurus) differed interspecifically in thermal tolerance from populations of stream-dwelling mottled (C. bairdi) and Tallapoosa sculpins (C. tallapoosae), and both stream and spring populations of banded sculpins (C. carolinae). No intra- or interspecific differences in thermal tolerance were found among populations of C. bairdi, C. tallapoosae, or C. carolinae. Coitus pygmaeus acclimated to 15??C differed intraspecifically in routine metabolism from fish acclimated to 20?? and 25??C. Cottus pygmaeus and stream-dwelling C. bairdi and C. carolinae acclimated to temperatures of 20?? and 25??C showed no interspecific differences in routine metabolism. Our results suggest that some spring-adapted populations or species may be more stenothermal than stream-dwelling congeners, but a greater understanding of the interactions of other physical and biological factors is required to better explain micro- and macrohabitat distributions of eastern North American sculpins.

  18. Economic Implementation and Optimization of Secondary Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Cary D. Brock

    The St Mary West Barker Sand Unit (SMWBSU or Unit) located in Lafayette County, Arkansas was unitized for secondary recovery operations in 2002 followed by installation of a pilot injection system in the fall of 2003. A second downdip water injection well was added to the pilot project in 2005 and 450,000 barrels of saltwater has been injected into the reservoir sand to date. Daily injection rates have been improved over initial volumes by hydraulic fracture stimulation of the reservoir sand in the injection wells. Modifications to the injection facilities are currently being designed to increase water injection rates formore » the pilot flood. A fracture treatment on one of the production wells resulted in a seven-fold increase of oil production. Recent water production and increased oil production in a producer closest to the pilot project indicates possible response to the water injection. The reservoir and wellbore injection performance data obtained during the pilot project will be important to the secondary recovery optimization study for which the DOE grant was awarded. The reservoir characterization portion of the modeling and simulation study is in progress by Strand Energy project staff under the guidance of University of Houston Department of Geosciences professor Dr. Janok Bhattacharya and University of Texas at Austin Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering professor Dr. Larry W. Lake. A geologic and petrophysical model of the reservoir is being constructed from geophysical data acquired from core, well log and production performance histories. Possible use of an outcrop analog to aid in three dimensional, geostatistical distribution of the flow unit model developed from the wellbore data will be investigated. The reservoir model will be used for full-field history matching and subsequent fluid flow simulation based on various injection schemes including patterned water flooding, addition of alkaline surfactant-polymer (ASP) to the

  19. Passive Heating Attenuates Post-exercise Cardiac Autonomic Recovery in Healthy Young Males.

    PubMed

    Peçanha, Tiago; Forjaz, Cláudia L de Moraes; Low, David A

    2017-01-01

    Post-exercise heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) presents a biphasic pattern, which is mediated by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic withdrawal. Several mechanisms regulate these post-exercise autonomic responses and thermoregulation has been proposed to play an important role. The aim of this study was to test the effects of heat stress on HRR and HR variability (HRV) after aerobic exercise in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy males (25 ± 1 years, 23.8 ± 0.5 kg/m 2 ) performed 14 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise (40-60% HR reserve ) followed by 5 min of loadless active recovery in two conditions: heat stress (HS) and normothermia (NT). In HS, subjects dressed in a whole-body water-perfused tube-lined suit to increase internal temperature (T c ) by ~1°C. In NT, subjects did not wear the suit. HR, core and skin temperatures (T c and T sk ), mean arterial pressure (MAP) skin blood flow (SKBF), and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were measured throughout and analyzed during post-exercise recovery. HRR was assessed through calculations of HR decay after 60 and 300 s of recovery (HRR60s and HRR300s), and the short- and long-term time constants of HRR (T30 and HRRt). Post-exercise HRV was examined via calculations of RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR intervals) and RMS (root mean square residual of RR intervals). The HS protocol promoted significant thermal stress and hemodynamic adjustments during the recovery (HS-NT differences: T c = +0.7 ± 0.3°C; T sk = +3.2 ± 1.5°C; MAP = -12 ± 14 mmHg; SKBF = +90 ± 80 a.u; CVC = +1.5 ± 1.3 a.u./mmHg). HRR and post-exercise HRV were significantly delayed in HS (e.g., HRR60s = 27 ± 9 vs. 44 ± 12 bpm, P < 0.01; HRR300s = 39 ± 12 vs. 59 ± 16 bpm, P < 0.01). The effects of heat stress (e.g., the HS-NT differences) on HRR were associated with its effects on thermal and hemodynamic responses. In conclusion, heat stress delays HRR, and this effect seems to be mediated by an attenuated

  20. Passive Heating Attenuates Post-exercise Cardiac Autonomic Recovery in Healthy Young Males

    PubMed Central

    Peçanha, Tiago; Forjaz, Cláudia L. de Moraes; Low, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Post-exercise heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) presents a biphasic pattern, which is mediated by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic withdrawal. Several mechanisms regulate these post-exercise autonomic responses and thermoregulation has been proposed to play an important role. The aim of this study was to test the effects of heat stress on HRR and HR variability (HRV) after aerobic exercise in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy males (25 ± 1 years, 23.8 ± 0.5 kg/m2) performed 14 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise (40–60% HRreserve) followed by 5 min of loadless active recovery in two conditions: heat stress (HS) and normothermia (NT). In HS, subjects dressed in a whole-body water-perfused tube-lined suit to increase internal temperature (Tc) by ~1°C. In NT, subjects did not wear the suit. HR, core and skin temperatures (Tc and Tsk), mean arterial pressure (MAP) skin blood flow (SKBF), and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were measured throughout and analyzed during post-exercise recovery. HRR was assessed through calculations of HR decay after 60 and 300 s of recovery (HRR60s and HRR300s), and the short- and long-term time constants of HRR (T30 and HRRt). Post-exercise HRV was examined via calculations of RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR intervals) and RMS (root mean square residual of RR intervals). The HS protocol promoted significant thermal stress and hemodynamic adjustments during the recovery (HS-NT differences: Tc = +0.7 ± 0.3°C; Tsk = +3.2 ± 1.5°C; MAP = −12 ± 14 mmHg; SKBF = +90 ± 80 a.u; CVC = +1.5 ± 1.3 a.u./mmHg). HRR and post-exercise HRV were significantly delayed in HS (e.g., HRR60s = 27 ± 9 vs. 44 ± 12 bpm, P < 0.01; HRR300s = 39 ± 12 vs. 59 ± 16 bpm, P < 0.01). The effects of heat stress (e.g., the HS-NT differences) on HRR were associated with its effects on thermal and hemodynamic responses. In conclusion, heat stress delays HRR, and this effect seems to be mediated by an attenuated parasympathetic

  1. Systems and applications analysis for concentrating photovoltaic-thermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwinkendorf, W. E.

    Numerical simulations were carried out of the performance, costs, and land use requirements of five commercial and six residential applications of combined photovoltaic-thermal (PVT) power plants. Line focus Fresnel concentrators (LFF) systems were selected after a simulated comparison of different PVT systems. Load profiles were configured from industrial data and ASHRAE and building codes. Assumptions included costs of $1/Wp, 0.15 efficiency, and a cost of $275/sq m, as well as a 25 percent solar tax credit. The calculations showed that a significant low temperature thermal load must be available, but no heat recovery system. Industrial situations were identified which favor solar thermal energy alone rather than a combined system. The thermal energy displacement was determined to be the critical factor in assessing the economics of the PVT systems.

  2. A Thermally-Regenerative Ammonia-Based Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Recovery from Waste Heat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce

    2016-04-21

    Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures <130 °C) are released during many industrial, geothermal, and solar-based processes. Using thermally-regenerative ammonia solutions, low-grade thermal energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m(-2) (15 kW m(-3) ) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte (-3) , with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Estimation of lifespan and economy parameters of steam-turbine power units in thermal power plants using varying regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Shkret, A. F.; Garievskii, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    The use of potent power units in thermal and nuclear power plants in order to regulate the loads results in intense wear of power generating equipment and reduction in cost efficiency of their operation. We review the methodology of a quantitative assessment of the lifespan and wear of steam-turbine power units and estimate the effect of various operation regimes upon their efficiency. To assess the power units' equipment wear, we suggest using the concept of a turbine's equivalent lifespan. We give calculation formulae and an example of calculation of the lifespan of a steam-turbine power unit for supercritical parameters of steam for different options of its loading. The equivalent lifespan exceeds the turbine's assigned lifespan only provided daily shutdown of the power unit during the night off-peak time. We obtained the engineering and economical indices of the power unit operation for different loading regulation options in daily and weekly diagrams. We proved the change in the prime cost of electric power depending on the operation regimes and annual daily number of unloading (non-use) of the power unit's installed capacity. According to the calculation results, the prime cost of electric power for the assumed initial data varies from 11.3 cents/(kW h) in the basic regime of power unit operation (with an equivalent operation time of 166700 hours) to 15.5 cents/(kW h) in the regime with night and holiday shutdowns. The reduction of using the installed capacity of power unit at varying regimes from 3.5 to 11.9 hours per day can increase the prime cost of energy from 4.2 to 37.4%. Furthermore, repair and maintenance costs grow by 4.5% and by 3 times, respectively, in comparison with the basic regime. These results indicate the need to create special maneuverable equipment for working in the varying section of the electric load diagram.

  4. Thermal Analysis of a Power Conditioning Unit for a Howitzer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    contact resistance Interface ( mA2 -K / W) AL-PCB 0.000389 AL-AL (thermal grease) 0.000083 AL-power chips 0.003891 AL-power chips (thermal grease...1120 W/ mA2 . Figure 3 shows the view of the box that the source of the solar radiation sees. The inside of the box is cluttered with cables, wiring, and...temperature (130°F) and a conservative convective heat transfer coefficient (5 W/ mA2 ) to all of the outer surfaces. These outer surfaces would

  5. Site-specific investigations on aquifer thermal energy storage for space and process cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R.

    1991-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed three preliminary site-specific feasibility studies that investigated aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for reducing space and process cooling costs. Chilled water stored in an ATES system could be used to meet all or part of the process and/or space cooling loads at the three facilities investigated. Seasonal or diurnal chill ATES systems could be significantly less expensive than a conventional electrically-driven, load-following chiller system at one of the three sites, depending on the cooling water loop return temperature and presumed future electricity escalation rate. For the other two sites investigated, a chill ATES system would be economically competitive with conventional chillers if onsite aquifer characteristics were improved. Well flow rates at one of the sites were adequate, but the expected thermal recovery efficiency was too low. The reverse of this situation was found at the other site, where the thermal recovery efficiency was expected to be adequate, but well flow rates were too low.

  6. Performance of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU): Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery (A/L CLR) Hardware - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Rector, tony; Gazda, Daniel; Lewis, John

    2009-01-01

    An EMU water processing kit (Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery A/L CLR) was developed as a corrective action to Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) coolant flow disruptions experienced on the International Space Station (ISS) in May of 2004 and thereafter. Conservative schedules for A/L CLR use and component life were initially developed and implemented based on prior analysis results and analytical modeling. The examination of postflight samples and EMU hardware in November of 2006 indicated that the A/L CLR kits were functioning well and had excess capacity that would allow a relaxation of the initially conservative schedules of use and component life. A relaxed use schedule and list of component lives was implemented thereafter. Since the adoption of the relaxed A/L CLR schedules of use and component lives, several A/L CLR kit components, transport loop water samples and sensitive EMU transport loop components have been examined to gage the impact of the relaxed requirements. The intent of this paper is to summarize the findings of that evaluation, and to outline updated schedules for A/L CLR use and component life.

  7. THE ROLE OF THERMAL REGIMEN IN TUNDRA PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral extraction activities in the Arctic regions of the world produce long-lasting ecological disturbances. Assisted recovery from such disturbances may require restoration of the tundra thermal regime. We transplanted plugs of entire root zone and live tundra plants to a dist...

  8. Thermal treatment of solid residues from WtE units: a review.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Daniel; Molin, Camilla; Hupa, Mikko

    2015-03-01

    Thermal treatment methods of bottom ash, fly ash and various types of APC (air pollution control) residues from waste-to-energy plants can be used to obtain environmentally stable material. The thermal treatment processes are meant to reduce the leachability of harmful residue constituents, destroy toxic organic compounds, reduce residue volume, and produce material suitable for utilization. Fly ash and APC residues often have high levels of soluble salts, particularly chlorides, metals such as cadmium, lead, copper and zinc, and trace levels of organic pollutants such as dioxins and furans. Different thermal treatment methods can be used to either decompose or stabilize harmful elements and compounds in the ash, or separate them from the ash to get a material that can be safely stored or used as products or raw materials. In the present paper, thermal treatment methods, such as sintering, vitrification, and melting have been reviewed. In addition to a review of the scientific literature, a survey has been made of the extensive patent literature in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ljungqvist, Olle; Scott, Michael; Fearon, Kenneth C

    2017-03-01

    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) is a paradigm shift in perioperative care, resulting in substantial improvements in clinical outcomes and cost savings. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery is a multimodal, multidisciplinary approach to the care of the surgical patient. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery process implementation involves a team consisting of surgeons, anesthetists, an ERAS coordinator (often a nurse or a physician assistant), and staff from units that care for the surgical patient. The care protocol is based on published evidence. The ERAS Society, an international nonprofit professional society that promotes, develops, and implements ERAS programs, publishes updated guidelines for many operations, such as evidence-based modern care changes from overnight fasting to carbohydrate drinks 2 hours before surgery, minimally invasive approaches instead of large incisions, management of fluids to seek balance rather than large volumes of intravenous fluids, avoidance of or early removal of drains and tubes, early mobilization, and serving of drinks and food the day of the operation. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery protocols have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay by 30% to 50% and similar reductions in complications, while readmissions and costs are reduced. The elements of the protocol reduce the stress of the operation to retain anabolic homeostasis. The ERAS Society conducts structured implementation programs that are currently in use in more than 20 countries. Local ERAS teams from hospitals are trained to implement ERAS processes. Audit of process compliance and patient outcomes are important features. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery started mainly with colorectal surgery but has been shown to improve outcomes in almost all major surgical specialties. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery is an evidence-based care improvement process for surgical patients. Implementation of ERAS programs results in major improvements in clinical outcomes and cost

  10. Evaluation of physiological strain in hot work areas using thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Holm, Clint A; Pahler, Leon; Thiese, Matthew S; Handy, Rodney

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring core body temperature to identify heat strain in workers engaged in hot work in heat stress environments is intrusive and expensive. Nonintrusive, inexpensive methods are needed to calculate individual Physiological Strain Index (PSI). Thermal imaging and heart rate monitoring were used in this study to calculate Physiological Strain Index (PSI) from thermal imaging temperatures of human subjects wearing thermal protective garments during recovery from hot work. Ten male subjects were evaluated for physiological strain while participating in hot work. Thermal images of the head and neck were captured with a high-resolution thermal imaging camera concomitant with measures of gastrointestinal and skin temperature. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (rho_c), Pearson's coefficient (r) and bias correction factor (C-b) were calculated to compare thermal imaging based temperatures to gastrointestinal temperatures. Calculations of PSI based thermal imaging recorded temperatures were compared to gastrointestinal based PSI. Participants reached a peak PSI of 5.2, indicating moderate heat strain. Sagittal measurements showed low correlation (rho_c=0.133), moderate precision (r=0.496) and low accuracy (C_b=0.269) with gastrointestinal temperature. Bland-Altman plots of imaging measurements showed increasing agreement as gastrointestinal temperature rose; however, the Limits of Agreement (LoA) fell outside the ±0.25C range of clinical significance. Bland-Altman plots of PSI calculated from imaging measurements showed increasing agreement as gastrointestinal temperature rose; however, the LoA fell outside the ±0.5 range of clinical significance. Results of this study confirmed previous research showing thermal imagery is not highly correlated to body core temperature during recovery from moderate heat strain in mild ambient conditions. Measurements display a trend toward increasing correlation at higher body core temperatures. Accuracy was not sufficient at

  11. The Exploration Water Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ORourke, Mary Jane E.; Carter, Layne; Holder, Donald W.; Tomes, Kristin M.

    2006-01-01

    The Exploration Water Recovery System is designed towards fulfillment of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration, which will require elevation of existing technologies to higher levels of optimization. This new system, designed for application to the Exploration infrastructure, presents a novel combination of proven air and water purification technologies. The integration of unit operations is modified from that of the current state-of-the-art water recovery system so as to optimize treatment of the various waste water streams, contaminant loads, and flow rates. Optimization is achieved primarily through the removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase prior to their absorption into the liquid phase. In the current state-of-the-art system, the water vapor in the cabin atmosphere is condensed, and the volatile organic contaminants present in that atmosphere are absorbed into the aqueous phase. Removal of contaminants the5 occurs via catalytic oxidation in the liquid phase. Oxidation kinetics, however, dictate that removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase can inherently be more efficient than their removal from the aqueous phase. Taking advantage of this efficiency reduces the complexity of the water recovery system. This reduction in system complexity is accompanied by reductions in the weight, volume, power, and resupply requirements of the system. Vapor compression distillation technology is used to treat the urine, condensate, and hygiene waste streams. This contributes to the reduction in resupply, as incorporation of vapor compression distillation technology at this point in the process reduces reliance on the expendable ion exchange and adsorption media used in the current state-of-the-art water recovery system. Other proven technologies that are incorporated into the Exploration Water Recovery System include the Trace Contaminant Control System and the Volatile Removal Assembly.

  12. Potential of resource recovery in UASB/trickling filter systems treating domestic sewage in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Bressani-Ribeiro, T; Brandt, E M F; Gutierrez, K G; Díaz, C A; Garcia, G B; Chernicharo, C A L

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to present perspectives for energy (thermal and electric) and nutrient (N and S) recovery in domestic sewage treatment systems comprised of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors followed by sponge-bed trickling filters (SBTF) in developing countries. The resource recovery potential was characterized, taking into account 114 countries and a corresponding population of 968.9 million inhabitants living in the tropical world, which were grouped into three desired ranges in terms of cities' size. For each of these clusters, a technological arrangement flow-sheet was proposed, depending on their technical and economic viability from our best experience. Considering the population living in cities over 100, 000 inhabitants, the potential of energy and nutrient recovery via the sewage treatment scheme would be sufficient to generate electricity for approximately 3.2 million residents, as well as thermal energy for drying purposes that could result in a 24% volume reduction of sludge to be transported and disposed of in landfills. The results show that UASB/SBTF systems can play a very important role in the sanitation and environmental sector towards more sustainable sewage treatment plants.

  13. Thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, William John; Kratochvil, Adam Michal

    2014-03-04

    The various embodiments of the present disclosure relate generally to thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a composition comprising: a first polymer comprising a first repeat unit, the first repeat unit comprising a carboxyl group, wherein the first polymer crosslinks to a second polymer formed from a second repeat unit, and wherein the first polymer crosslinks to the second polymer without formation of an ester group.

  14. Recovery and concordance in a secure forensic psychiatry hospital - the self rated DUNDRUM-3 programme completion and DUNDRUM-4 recovery scales.

    PubMed

    Davoren, Mary; Hennessy, Sarah; Conway, Catherine; Marrinan, Seamus; Gill, Pauline; Kennedy, Harry G

    2015-03-28

    Detention in a secure forensic psychiatric hospital may inhibit engagement and recovery. Having validated the clinician rated DUNDRUM-3 (programme completion) and DUNDRUM-4 (recovery) in a forensic hospital, we set out to draft and validate scales measuring the same programme completion and recovery items that patients could use to self-rate. Based on previous work, we hypothesised that self-rating scores might be predictors of objective progress including conditional discharge. We hypothesised also that the difference between patients' and clinicians' ratings of progress in treatment and other factors relevant to readiness for discharge (concordance) would diminish as patients neared discharge. We hypothesised also that this difference in matched scores would predict objective progress including conditional discharge. In a prospective naturalistic observational cohort study in a forensic hospital, we examined whether scores on the self-rated DUNDRUM-3 programme completion and DUNDRUM-4 recovery scales or differences between clinician and patient ratings on the same scales (concordance) would predict moves between levels of therapeutic security and conditional discharge over the next twelve months. Both scales stratified along the recovery pathway of the hospital, but clinician ratings matched the level of therapeutic security more accurately than self ratings. The clinician rated scales predicted moves to less secure units and to more secure units and predicted conditional discharge but the self-rated scores did not. The difference between clinician and self-rated scores (concordance) predicted positive and negative moves and conditional discharge, but this was not always an independent predictor as shown by regression analysis. In regression analysis the DUNDRUM-3 predicted moves to less secure places though the HCR-20 C & R score dominated the model. Moves back to more secure places were predicted by lack of concordance on the DUNDRUM-4. Conditional discharge

  15. A preliminary study on shape recovery speed of a styrene-based shape memory polymer composite actuated by different heating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuelian; Zhang, Wuyi; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2007-07-01

    Thermally activated shape memory polymers (SMPs) receive increasing attention in recent years. Different from those reported in the literature, in this paper we propose a new approach, i.e., using infrared light, for heating SMPs for shape recovery. We compare this approach with the traditional water bath method in terms of shape recovery speed in bending at both vacuum and no vacuum conditions. The results reveal that the shape recovery speed in infrared heating at vacuum condition is about eight times slower than that by hot water. However, the recovery time is more than doubled if without vacuum.

  16. A Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS) development overview - AI-based control of a Space Station prototype thermal bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Hack, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge-based control system for real-time control and fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) of a prototype two-phase Space Station Freedom external thermal control system (TCS) is discussed in this paper. The Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS) has been demonstrated in recent tests to be capable of both fault anticipation and detection and real-time control of the thermal bus. Performance requirements were achieved by using a symbolic control approach, layering model-based expert system software on a conventional numerical data acquisition and control system. The model-based capabilities of TEXSYS were shown to be advantageous during software development and testing. One representative example is given from on-line TCS tests of TEXSYS. The integration and testing of TEXSYS with a live TCS testbed provides some insight on the use of formal software design, development and documentation methodologies to qualify knowledge-based systems for on-line or flight applications.

  17. Examining Pharmacy Workforce Issues in the United States and the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Covvey, Jordan R.; Cohron, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine available data and actions surrounding current pharmacy workforce issues in the United States and United Kingdom. Methods. Published pharmacy workforce data from the United States and United Kingdom were gathered from various sources, including PUBMED, Internet search engines, and pharmacy organization websites. Data was collated from additional sources including scientific literature, internal documents, news releases, and policy positions. Results. The number of colleges and schools of pharmacy has expanded by approximately 50% in both the United States and United Kingdom over the previous decade. In the United States, continued demand for the pharmacy workforce has been forecasted, but this need is based on outdated supply figures and assumptions for economic recovery. In the United Kingdom, workforce modeling has predicted a significant future oversupply of pharmacists, and action within the profession has attempted to address the situation through educational planning and regulation. Conclusion. Workforce planning is an essential task for sustaining a healthy profession. Recent workforce planning mechanisms in the United Kingdom may provide guidance for renewed efforts within the profession in the United States. PMID:25861098

  18. Thermal control design of the Lightning Mapper Sensor narrow-band spectral filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannery, Martin R.; Potter, John; Raab, Jeff R.; Manlief, Scott K.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the Lightning Mapper Sensor is dependent on the temperature shifts of its narrowband spectral filter. To perform over a 10 degree FOV with an 0.8 nm bandwidth, the filter must be 15 cm in diameter and mounted externally to the telescope optics. The filter thermal control required a filter design optimized for minimum bandpass shift with temperature, a thermal analysis of substrate materials for maximum temperature uniformity, and a thermal radiation analysis to determine the parameter sensitivity of the radiation shield for the filter, the filter thermal recovery time after occultation, and heater power to maintain filter performance in the earth-staring geosynchronous environment.

  19. Temperature dependence of negative bias under illumination stress and recovery in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain Chowdhury, Md Delwar; Migliorato, Piero; Jang, Jin

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of negative bias under illumination stress and recovery. The transfer characteristics exhibits a non-rigid shift towards negative gate voltages. For both stress and recovery, the voltage shift in deep depletion is twice that in accumulation. The results support the mechanism we previously proposed, which is creation and annealing of a double donor, likely to be an oxygen vacancy. The time dependence of stress and recovery can be fitted to stretched exponentials. Both processes are thermally activated with activation energies 1.06 eV and 1.25 eV for stress and recovery, respectively. A potential energy diagram is proposed to explain the results.

  20. Recovery of Ecosystem Carbon and Energy Fluxes From the 2003 Drought in Europe and the 2012 Drought in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Liu, Junjie; Guo, Lanlan; Wu, Xiuchen; Xie, Xaoming; Zhang, Yafeng; Chen, Chen; Zhong, Ziqian; Chen, Ziyue

    2018-05-01

    Recovery of an ecosystem from drought is an important indicator of ecosystem resilience. However, few investigations have heretofore focused on the recovery of ecosystem carbon and energy fluxes but have mainly focused on the drought recovery of plant growth and ecosystem productions. Therefore, the present study uses in situ observations from FLUXNET 2015 to examine the recovery of carbon flux and energy flux of ecosystems from the 2003 European drought and the 2012 U.S. drought on the daily scale. The results reveal the strong impact of these two extreme droughts on ecosystem gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange, and latent heat flux. In addition, the recovery time of these indicators differ significantly. At the regional scale, the recovery of gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange, and latent heat flux took 44, 23, 63, and 27 days after the 2003 European drought, and the recovery for corresponding indicators for the 2012 U.S. drought took 42, 63, 15, and 33 days, respectively. Further investigations suggest that indicator background conditions and drought-damage magnitudes played an important role in regulating drought recovery in the 2003 European drought, with lower background value and greater damage leading to a longer recovery time. The ecosystem recovery from the 2012 U.S. drought, however, was dominated by the precipitation condition during the recovery period, with more precipitation associated with a shorter recovery time. These results provide crucial insight into the divergent recovery trajectories for different carbon-water processes among diverse bioclimatic regions.

  1. Measuring Outcomes of an Intensive Care Unit Family Diary Program.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Truong-Giang; Covalesky, Miranda; Sinclair, Samantha; Gunter, Heather; Norton, Tamara; Chen, Alice; Yi, Cassia

    2017-01-01

    Patients discharged from intensive care units are at risk of short- and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome. Family members of intensive care unit patients are at risk of similar symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome-family. Both syndromes are common, and strategies to reduce risk factors should be employed. An intensive care unit diary project to help reduce these syndromes was implemented in 2 intensive care units using an evidence-based framework. The effects of these diaries were studied using the Family Satisfaction with Care in the Intensive Care Unit survey. Rates of referrals to a postintensive care unit recovery clinic were also observed in relation to the diaries. Although preliminary data did not reveal a significant increase in family satisfaction, the surveys provided important staff feedback. The diaries fostered feelings of compassion and caring as well as built trust between staff and family members of intensive care unit patients. The diaries increased referrals to the postintensive care unit recovery clinic. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Natural bodybuilding competition preparation and recovery: a 12-month case study.

    PubMed

    Rossow, Lindy M; Fukuda, David H; Fahs, Christopher A; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Bodybuilding is a sport in which competitors are judged on muscular appearance. This case study tracked a drug-free male bodybuilder (age 26-27 y) for the 6 mo before and after a competition. The aim of this study was to provide the most comprehensive physiological profile of bodybuilding competition preparation and recovery ever compiled. Cardiovascular parameters, body composition, strength, aerobic capacity, critical power, mood state, resting energy expenditure, and hormonal and other blood parameters were evaluated. Heart rate decreased from 53 to 27 beats/min during preparation and increased to 46 beats/min within 1 mo after competition. Brachial blood pressure dropped from 132/69 to 104/56 mmHg during preparation and returned to 116/64 mmHg at 6 mo after competition. Percent body fat declined from 14.8% to 4.5% during preparation and returned to 14.6% during recovery. Strength decreased during preparation and did not fully recover during 6 months of recovery. Testosterone declined from 9.22 to 2.27 ng/mL during preparation and returned back to the baseline level, 9.91 ng/mL, after competition. Total mood disturbance increased from 6 to 43 units during preparation and recovered to 4 units 6 mo after competition. This case study provides a thorough documentation of the physiological changes that occurred during natural bodybuilding competition and recovery.

  3. Phylogeography of the American woodcock (Scolopax minor): Are management units based on band recovery data reflected in genetically based management units?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhymer, J.M.; McAuley, D.G.; Ziel, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    Information on population connectivity throughout the annual cycle has become more crucial, because populations of many migratory birds are in decline. One such species is the American Woodcock (Scolopax minor), which inhabits early-successional forests in eastern North America. Although band recoveries have proved useful for dividing populations of this game bird species into an Eastern Region and Central Region for management purposes, these data do not provide enough detail to determine the breeding population of origin of birds recovered on stopover and wintering areas. To obtain more fine-scale data, we undertook a phylogeographic study of American Woodcock populations throughout their primary breeding range in the eastern United States and Canada using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from the hypervariable control region I (CRI) and ND6 gene. Despite high haplotype diversity, nucleotide diversity was low and there was no phylogeographic structure among American Woodcock populations across the species range, with birds from many states and provinces in both management regions sharing identical haplotypes. Results suggest recent or ongoing gene flow among populations, with asymmetric movement of birds between migration flyways. As has been demonstrated for several other avian species in North America, American Woodcock appear to have undergone a rapid population expansion following the late Pleistocene glacial retreat. Thus, a combination of historical demographic factors and recent or ongoing gene flow mask any population structure based on mtDNA that might accrue from philopatry to breeding areas observed in studies of marked birds.

  4. Imposed Thermal Fatigue and Post-Thermal-Cycle Wear Resistance of Biomimetic Gray Cast Iron by Laser Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Deping; Chen, Zhikai; Zhang, Peng

    2017-08-01

    The present study aims to create coupling biomimetic units on gray cast iron substrate by laser surface treatment (LST). LSTs for single-step (LST1) and two-step (LST2) processes, were carried out on gray cast iron in different media (air and water). Their effects on microstructure, thermal fatigue, and post-thermal-cycle wear (PTW) resistance on the specimens were studied. The tests were carried out to examine the influence of crack-resistance behavior as well as the biomimetic surface on its post-thermal-cycle wear behavior and different units, with different laser treatments for comparison. Results showed that LST2 enhanced the PTW behaviors of gray cast iron, which then led to an increase in its crack resistance. Among the treated cast irons, the one treated by LST2 in air showed the lowest residual stress, due to the positive effect of the lower steepness of the thermal gradient. Moreover, the same specimen showed the best PTW performance, due to its superior crack resistance and higher hardness as a result of it.

  5. Evaluation of Immunomagnetic Separation for Recovery of Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts from Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rochelle, Paul A.; De Leon, Ricardo; Johnson, Anne; Stewart, Mic H.; Wolfe, Roy L.

    1999-01-01

    Two commercial immunomagnetic separation (IMS) kits for Cryptosporidium were compared for recovery of oocysts from environmental samples. Oocyst recovery efficiencies with the Dynal and Crypto-Scan kits ranged from 62 to 100% and 34 to 74%, respectively, for seeded environmental water concentrates (turbidity of 210 to 11,480 nephelometric turbidity units). Recovery efficiencies were dependent on the mechanism of agitation during the magnetic capture procedure. An assay combining in vitro cell culture and reverse transcriptase PCR demonstrated that oocysts recovered by IMS retained their infectivity. PMID:9925626

  6. Apollo 17 - Command Module (CM) - Pre-Recovery Operations - South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-19

    S72-56147 (19 Dec. 1972) --- A water-level view of the Apollo 17 Command Module (CM) floating in the Pacific Ocean following splashdown and prior to recovery. The prime recovery ship, the USS Ticonderoga, is in the background. When this picture was taken, the three-man crew of astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt, had already been picked up by helicopter and flown to the deck of the recovery ship. The spacecraft was later hoisted aboard the USS Ticonderoga. A United States Navy UDT swimmer stands on the flotation collar. Apollo 17 splashdown occurred at 1:24:59 p.m. (CST), Dec. 19, 1972, about 350 nautical miles southeast of Samoa.

  7. Teaching the design of thermal systems using equation solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, S.

    1999-07-01

    Teaching the design of thermal systems requires an integrated approach that treats subjects such as thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer as parts of one interconnected area, in which appropriate solutions to real-life design and analysis problems can be obtained only when all these aspects are considered simultaneously. This approach must be implemented through open-ended homework problems and design project-oriented teaching. Topics related to HVAC and other thermal systems that must be addressed include fluid flow networks, heat exchanger design, design and selection of pumps, fans and compressors, heat recovery systems, psychrometrics, air-conditioning systems, electronic cooling systems, fuels and combustion,more » solar thermal systems, and power plant design. A course that teaches the design of such systems and the wide array of thermal science applications is described in this paper.« less

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure report: Area 2 Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells, Correction Action Unit 90

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This Closure Report provides documentation of the activities conducted during the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Spring Quadrangle (USGS, 1986), Township 10 South, Range 53 East, Nye County, Nevada. This report discusses the Bitcutter Shop Inside Injection Well (CAU 90-A) closure-in-place and the Bitcutter Shop Outside Injection Well (CAU 90-B) and Postshot Containment Shop Injection Well (CAU 90-C) clean closures. This Closure Report provides background information about the unit, the results of the characterization activities and actions conductedmore » to determine the closure design. It also provides a discussion of the drainage analysis, preliminary closure activities, final closure activities, waste management activities, and the Post-Closure Care requirements.« less

  9. Finite element analysis on the thermoelectric generator for the waste heat recovery of solar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Muhammad Nubli; Ilias, Izzudin; Abas, Amir; Muhamad, Wan Mansor Wan

    2017-09-01

    Thermoelectric generator (TEG) is the solid state device that converts the thermal gradient into electrical energy. TEG is widely used as the renewable energy source especially for the electronic equipment that operates with the small amount of electrical power. In the present analysis, the finite element analysis (FEA) using ANSYS is conducted on a model of the TEG attached with the aluminium, Al plate on the hot side of the TEG. This simple construction of TEG model was built in order to be used in the waste heat recovery of solar application. It was shown that the changes of the area and thickness of the Al plate increased the temperature gradient between hot and cold sides of TEG. This directly increase the voltage produced by the TEG based on the Seeback effect. The increase of the thermal gradient due to the increment of thickness and width of Al plate might be because of the increase of thermal resistance of Al plate. This finding provides a valuable data in design process to build a good TEG attached with Al plate for the waste heat recovery of solar application.

  10. A model for improving endangered species recovery programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brian; Reading, Richard; Conway, Courtney; Jackson, Jerome A.; Hutchins, Michael; Snyder, Noel; Forrest, Steve; Frazier, Jack; Derrickson, Scott

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses common organizational problems that cause inadequate planning and implementation processes of endangered species recovery across biologically dissimilar species. If these problems occur, even proven biological conservation techniques are jeopardized. We propose a solution that requires accountability in all phases of the restoration process and is based on cooperative input among government agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, and the academic community. The first step is formation of a task-oriented recovery team that integrates the best expertise into the planning process. This interdisciplinary team should be composed of people whose skills directly address issues critical for recovery. Once goals and procedures are established, the responsible agency (for example, in the United States, the US Fish and Wildlife Service) could divest some or all of its obligation for implementing the plan, yet still maintain oversight by holding implementing entities contractually accountable. Regular, periodic outside review and public documentation of the recovery team, lead agency, and the accomplishments of implementing bodies would permit evaluation necessary to improve performance. Increased cooperation among agency and nongovernmental organizations provided by this model promises a more efficient use of limited resources toward the conservation of biodiversity.

  11. Remodeling of motor units after nerve regeneration studied by quantitative electromyography.

    PubMed

    Krarup, Christian; Boeckstyns, Michel; Ibsen, Allan; Moldovan, Mihai; Archibald, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve has the capacity to regenerate after nerve lesions; during reinnervation of muscle motor units are gradually reestablished. The aim of this study was to follow the time course of reestablishing and remodeling of motor units in relation to recovery of force after different types of nerve repair. Reinnervation of muscle was compared clinically and electrophysiologically in complete median or ulnar nerve lesions with short gap lengths in the distal forearm repaired with a collagen nerve conduit (11 nerves) or nerve suture (10 nerves). Reestablishment of motor units was studied by quantitative EMG and recording of evoked compound muscle action potential (CMAP) during a 24-month observation period after nerve repair. Force recovered partially to about 80% of normal. Denervation activity gradually decreased during reinnervation though it was still increased at 24 months. Nascent motor unit potentials (MUPs) at early reinnervation were prolonged and polyphasic. During longitudinal studies, MUPs remained prolonged and their amplitudes gradually increased markedly. Firing of MUPs was unstable throughout the study. CMAPs gradually increased and the number of motor units recovered to approximately 20% of normal. There was weak evidence of CMAP amplitude recovery after suture ahead of conduit repair but without treatment related differences at 2 years. Surgical repair of nerve lesions with a nerve conduit or suture supported recovery of force and of motor unit reinnervation to the same extent. Changes occurred at a higher rate during early regeneration and slower after 12 months but should be followed for at least 2 years to assess outcome. EMG changes reflected extensive remodeling of motor units from early nascent units to a mature state with greatly enlarged units due to axonal regeneration and collateral sprouting and maturation of regenerated nerve and reinnervated muscle fibers after both types of repair. Remodeling of motor units after peripheral nerve

  12. Integration of solar process heat into an existing thermal desalination plant in Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, S.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Aboumadi, M.; Pandian, Y.; Dersch, J.; Krüger, D.; Al-Rasheed, A. S.; Krüger, J.; Ottenburger, U.

    2016-05-01

    The water supply of many countries in the Middle East relies mainly on water desalination. In Qatar, the water network is completely fed with water from desalination plants. One of these power and desalination plants is located in Ras Abu Fontas, 20 km south of the capital Doha. The heat required for thermal desalination is provided by steam which is generated in waste heat recovery boilers (HRB) connected to gas turbines. Additionally, gas fired boilers or auxiliary firing in the HRBs are used in order to decouple the water generation from the electricity generation. In Ras Abu Fontas some auxiliary boilers run 24/7 because the HRB capacity does not match the demand of the desalination units. This paper contains the techno-economic analysis of two large-scale commercial solar field options, which could reduce the fuel consumption significantly. Both options employ parabolic trough technology with a nominal saturated steam output of 350 t/h at 15 bar (198°C, 240 MW). The first option uses direct steam generation without storage while the second relies on common thermal oil in combination with a molten salt thermal storage with 6 hours full-load capacity. The economic benefit of the integration of solar power depends mainly on the cost of the fossil alternative, and thus the price (respectively opportunity costs) of natural gas. At a natural gas price of 8 US-/MMBtu the internal rate of return on equity (IRR) is expected at about 5%.

  13. Introduction of enhanced recovery for elective caesarean section enabling next day discharge: a tertiary centre experience.

    PubMed

    Wrench, I J; Allison, A; Galimberti, A; Radley, S; Wilson, M J

    2015-05-01

    The widespread adoption of enhanced recovery programmes in various surgical specialties has resulted in patient benefits including reduced morbidity, reduced length of stay and an earlier return to normal activities. This evidence, along with the increased financial pressures in the UK National Health Service, has led many units to consider introducing such a programme for obstetric surgery. We report our experience in setting up an enhanced recovery programme for women undergoing elective caesarean section and a prospective analysis of factors that influence length of stay. An enhanced recovery pathway was designed by a multidisciplinary team and introduced in March 2012. Factors influencing length of stay were determined using a log normal model. The proportion of women discharged on Day 1 increased from 1.6% in the first quarter of 2012 to 25.2% in the first quarter of 2014. The 30-day readmission rate was 4.4% for those discharged on Day 1 and 5.6% for Day 2. Earlier gestation, multiple birth, intention to breast feed, longer surgery and more time in the post-anaesthesia recovery unit were all independently associated with a longer postoperative stay. Women presenting for obstetric surgery with the indication "one previous caesarean section" were more likely to leave hospital earlier compared to most other indications. An enhanced recovery programme was successfully introduced into our unit. Many of the interventions were straightforward and could be adopted easily elsewhere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of thermal imaging to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy: A systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Filipe; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Norte, Marco; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado; Vilaça-Alves, José

    2015-11-01

    Cryotherapy has been applied on clinical injuries and as a method for exercise recovery. It is aimed to reduce edema, nervous conduction velocity, and tissue metabolism, as well as to accelerate the recovery process of the muscle injury induced by exercise. Objective: This review aim to investigate the applicability of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy. Method: Search the Web of Science database using the terms "Cryotherapy", "Thermography", "Thermal Image" and "Cooling". Results: Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and pass the PEDro scale quality evaluation. Evidence support the use of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring the skin temperature during cryotherapy, and it is superior to other contact methods and subjective methods of assessing skin temperature. Conclusion: Thermography seems to be an efficient, trustworthy and secure method in order to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy application. Evidence supports the use of thermography in detriment of contact methods as well as other subjective ones.

  15. Field testing of aquifer thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, L. D.; Allen, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    Results of field and laboratory studies of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) indicate both the problems and promise of the concept. Geohydrothermal modeling and field testing demonstrated the ability to recover substantial quantities of aquifer stored energy. However, the local hydrologic conditions play an important role in determining the recovery temperature and storage efficiency. Geochemistry is also an important factor, particularly for higher temperature ATES systems.

  16. Combination of an electrolytic pretreatment unit with secondary water reclamation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.; Bonura, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a flight concept prototype electrolytic pretreatment unit (EPU) and of a contractor-furnished air evaporation unit (AEU) are described. The integrated EPU and AEU potable water recovery system is referred to as the Electrovap and is capable of processing the urine and flush water of a six-man crew. Results of a five-day performance verification test of the Electrovap system are presented and plans are included for the extended testing of the Electrovap to produce data applicable to the combination of electrolytic pretreatment with most final potable water recovery systems. Plans are also presented for a program to define the design requirements for combining the electrolytic pretreatment unit with a reverse osmosis final processing unit.

  17. Enhanced recovery after elective coronary revascularization surgery with minimal versus conventional extracorporeal circulation: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Kyriakos; Asteriou, Christos; Antonitsis, Polychronis; Argiriadou, Helena; Grosomanidis, Vassilios; Kyparissa, Magdalena; Deliopoulos, Apostolos; Konstantinou, Dimitrios; Tossios, Paschalis

    2013-10-01

    A minimal extracorporeal circulation (MECC) circuit integrates the advances in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) technology into a single circuit and is associated with improved short-term outcome. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate MECC compared with conventional CPB in facilitating fast-track recovery after elective coronary revascularization procedures. Prospective randomized study. All patients scheduled for elective coronary artery surgery were evaluated, excluding those considered particularly high risk for fast-track failure. The fast-track protocol included careful preoperative patient selection, a fast-track anesthetic technique based on minimal administration of fentanyl, surgery at normothermia, early postoperative extubation in the cardiac recovery unit, and admission to the cardiothoracic ward within the first 24 hours postoperatively. One hundred twenty patients were assigned randomly into 2 groups (60 in each group). Group A included patients who were operated on using the MECC circuit, whereas patients in Group B underwent surgery on conventional CPB. Incidence of fast-track recovery was significantly higher in patients undergoing MECC (25% v 6.7%, p = 0.006). MECC also was recognized as a strong independent predictor of early recovery, with an odds ratio of 3.8 (p = 0.011). Duration of mechanical ventilation and cardiac recovery unit stay were significantly lower in patients undergoing MECC together with the need for blood transfusion, duration of inotropic support, need for an intra-aortic balloon pump, and development of postoperative atrial fibrillation and renal failure. MECC promotes successful early recovery after elective coronary revascularization procedures, even in a nondedicated cardiac intensive care unit setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kuboňová, L., E-mail: lenka.kubonova@vsb.cz; Langová, Š.; Nowak, B.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • MSW fly ash was thermally and hydrometallurgically treated to remove heavy metals. • More than 90% of easy volatile heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were removed thermally. • More than 90% of Cd, Cr, Cu an Zn were removed by alkaline – acid leaching. • The best results were obtained for the solution of 3 M NaOH and 2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be amore » potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050 °C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200 °C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel.« less

  19. Uncertainty in Population Estimates for Endangered Animals and Improving the Recovery Process

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Aaron M.; Zak, Matthew; Hammond, Katie; Scott, J. Michael; Goble, Dale D.; Rachlow, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary The objective of our study was to evaluate the mention of uncertainty (i.e., variance) associated with population size estimates within U.S. recovery plans for endangered animals. To do this we reviewed all finalized recovery plans for listed terrestrial vertebrate species. We found that more recent recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty. Also, bird and mammal recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty. We recommend that updated recovery plans combine uncertainty of population size estimates with a minimum detectable difference to aid in successful recovery. Abstract United States recovery plans contain biological information for a species listed under the Endangered Species Act and specify recovery criteria to provide basis for species recovery. The objective of our study was to evaluate whether recovery plans provide uncertainty (e.g., variance) with estimates of population size. We reviewed all finalized recovery plans for listed terrestrial vertebrate species to record the following data: (1) if a current population size was given, (2) if a measure of uncertainty or variance was associated with current estimates of population size and (3) if population size was stipulated for recovery. We found that 59% of completed recovery plans specified a current population size, 14.5% specified a variance for the current population size estimate and 43% specified population size as a recovery criterion. More recent recovery plans reported more estimates of current population size, uncertainty and population size as a recovery criterion. Also, bird and mammal recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty compared to reptiles and amphibians. We suggest the use of calculating minimum detectable differences to improve confidence when delisting endangered animals and we identified incentives for individuals to get involved in recovery planning to improve access to

  20. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  1. Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep Prior to a Noxious Inflammatory Insult Influence Characteristics and Duration of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insufficient sleep and chronic pain are public health epidemics. Sleep loss worsens pain and predicts the development of chronic pain. Whether previous, acute sleep loss and recovery sleep determine pain levels and duration remains poorly understood. This study tested whether acute sleep deprivation and recovery sleep prior to formalin injection alter post-injection pain levels and duration. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48) underwent sleep deprivation or ad libitum sleep for 9 hours. Thereafter, rats received a subcutaneous injection of formalin or saline into a hind paw. In the recovery sleep group, rats were allowed 24 h between sleep deprivation and the injection of formalin. Mechanical and thermal nociception were assessed using the von Frey test and Hargreaves' method. Nociceptive measures were performed at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days post-injection. Results: Formalin caused bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that persisted for up to 21 days post-injection. Sleep deprivation significantly enhanced bilateral allodynia. There was a synergistic interaction when sleep deprivation preceded a formalin injection. Rats allowed a recovery sleep period prior to formalin injection developed allodynia only in the injected limb, with higher mechanical thresholds (less allodynia) and a shorter recovery period. There were no persistent changes in thermal nociception. Conclusion: The data suggest that acute sleep loss preceding an inflammatory insult enhances pain and can contribute to chronic pain. The results encourage studies in a model of surgical pain to test whether enhancing sleep reduces pain levels and duration. Citation: Vanini G. Sleep deprivation and recovery sleep prior to a noxious inflammatory insult influence characteristics and duration of pain. SLEEP 2016;39(1):133–142. PMID:26237772

  2. High temperature thermal energy storage in steel and sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic potential for high temperature (343 C, 650 F) thermal energy storage in hollow steel ingots, pipes embedded in concrete, and for pipes buried in sand was evaluated. Because it was determined that concrete would separate from pipes due to thermal stresses, concrete was replaced by sand, which is free from thermal stresses. Variations of the steel ingot concept were not cost effective compared to the sand-pipe approach, therefore, the sand-pipe thermal storage unit (TSU) was evaluated in depth to assess the approximate tube spacing requirements consistent with different system performance characteristics and also attendant system costs. For large TSUs which do not require fast response times, the sand-pipe approach offers attractive possibilities. A pipe diameter about 9 cm (3.5 in) and pipe spacing of approximately 25 cm (10 in), with sand filling the interspaces, appears appropriate. Such a TSU system designed for 8 hours charge/discharge cycle has an energy unit storage cost (CE) of $2.63/kWhr-t and a power unit storage cost (Cp) of $42/kW-t (in 1977 dollars).

  3. Recovery from schizophrenia and the recovery model.

    PubMed

    Warner, Richard

    2009-07-01

    The recovery model refers to subjective experiences of optimism, empowerment and interpersonal support, and to a focus on collaborative treatment approaches, finding productive roles for user/consumers, peer support and reducing stigma. The model is influencing service development around the world. This review will assess whether optimism about outcome from serious mental illness and other tenets of the recovery model are borne out by recent research. Remission of symptoms has been precisely defined, but the definition of 'recovery' is a more diffuse concept that includes such factors as being productive and functioning independently. Recent research and a large, earlier body of data suggest that optimism about outcome from schizophrenia is justified. A substantial proportion of people with the illness will recover completely and many more will regain good social functioning. Outcome is better for people in the developing world. Mortality for people with schizophrenia is increasing but is lower in the developing world. Working appears to help people recover from schizophrenia, and recent advances in vocational rehabilitation have been shown to be effective in countries with differing economies and labor markets. A growing body of research supports the concept that empowerment is an important component of the recovery process. Key tenets of the recovery model - optimism about recovery from schizophrenia, the importance of access to employment and the value of empowerment of user/consumers in the recovery process - are supported by the scientific research. Attempts to reduce the internalized stigma of mental illness should enhance the recovery process.

  4. Conceptualizing Social Recovery: Recovery Routes of Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Miriam; Gibson, David; Boshears, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our qualitative study was to gain a phenomenological understanding of routes to recovery from problematic drug use. In-depth interviews and drug histories were collected from 50 former methamphetamine users recruited from a U.S. metropolitan suburb who identified as having had problematic use of this drug in the past. Transcripts of the audio-recorded interviews were coded for common themes regarding types of recovery strategies or tools employed on the route to recovery. The common strategies used for recovery from problematic methamphetamine use in all routes were social in nature and did not necessarily include cessation of all substances. Based on our findings, we suggest a conceptualization of social recovery that focuses on reducing the social harms caused by problematic drug use rather than focusing primarily on cessation of all drug use. Social recovery may be employed as both a treatment strategy and analytical tool. More research is needed to advance the concept of social recovery for intervention, drug policy, and criminal justice implications. PMID:25574504

  5. Thermal gain of CHP steam generator plants and heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziganshina, S. K.; Kudinov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Heating calculation of the surface condensate heat recovery unit (HRU) installed behind the BKZ-420-140 NGM boiler resulting in determination of HRU heat output according to fire gas value parameters at the heat recovery unit inlet and its outlet, heated water quantity, combustion efficiency per boiler as a result of installation of HRU, and steam condensate discharge from combustion products at its cooling below condensing point and HRU heat exchange area has been performed. Inspection results of Samara CHP BKZ-420-140 NGM power boilers and field tests of the surface condensate heat recovery unit (HRU) made on the bimetal calorifier base KCk-4-11 (KSk-4-11) installed behind station no. 2 Ulyanovsk CHP-3 DE-10-14 GM boiler were the basis of calculation. Integration of the surface condensation heat recovery unit behind a steam boiler rendered it possible to increase combustion efficiency and simultaneously decrease nitrogen oxide content in exit gases. Influence of the blowing air moisture content, the excess-air coefficient in exit gases, and exit gases temperature at the HRU outlet on steam condensate amount discharge from combustion products at its cooling below condensing point has been analyzed. The steam condensate from HRU gases is offered as heat system make-up water after degasification. The cost-effectiveness analysis of HRU installation behind the Samara CHP BKZ-420-140 NGM steam boiler with consideration of heat energy and chemically purified water economy has been performed. Calculation data for boilers with different heat output has been generalized.

  6. ISS Ammonia Pump Failure, Recovery, and Lesson Learned A Hydrodynamic Bearing Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Manco, Richard A., II

    2014-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of long duration spaceflight hardware has become an evolutionary process in which meticulous attention to details and lessons learned from previous experiences play a critical role. Invaluable to this process is the ability to retrieve and examine spaceflight hardware that has experienced a premature failure. While these situations are rare and unfortunate, the failure investigation and recovery from the event serve a valuable purpose in advancing future space mechanism development. Such a scenario began on July 31, 2010 with the premature failure of an ammonia pump on the external active thermal control system of the International Space Station. The ground-based inspections of the returned pump and ensuing failure investigation revealed five potential bearing forces that were un-accounted for in the design phase and qualification testing of the pump. These forces could combine in a number of random orientations to overload the pump bearings leading to solid-surface contact, wear, and premature failure. The recovery plan identified one of these five forces as being related to the square of the operating speed of the pump and this fact was used to recover design life through a change in flight rules for the operation of the pump module. Through the course of the failure investigation, recovery, and follow-on assessment of pump wear life, design guidance has been developed to improve the life of future mechanically pumped thermal control systems for both human and robotic exploration missions.

  7. 40 CFR 74.47 - Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy-combustion sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... replacement of thermal energy-combustion sources. 74.47 Section 74.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—combustion sources. (a) Thermal energy plan—(1) General provisions. The designated representative of an opt... quarter the replacement unit(s) will replace thermal energy of the opt-in source; (ii) The name...

  8. The Paradoxical Roles of Climate Stressors on Disturbance and Recovery of Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfrino, C.; Foster, G.; Camp, E.

    2013-05-01

    The geographic isolation, absence of significant anthropogenic impacts, compressed spatial scale, and habitat diversity of Little Cayman combine to make it a natural laboratory for elucidating the dualistic impacts of various climatic events. These events both impart ecosystem disturbances and aid in the subsequent recovery of coral reef habitats. Within the isolated microcosm of Little Cayman the environmental factors commonly associated with coral stress, mortality, resilience and recovery hinted at by regional-scale observations can be more clearly observed. The primary thrust of this study is to reveal the under-pinning biophysical and hydrologic factors pertinent to reef resilience and to better understand the various roles played by climatic disturbances that have led to the rapid recovery of corals at Little Cayman following a spate of high temperature anomalies. Six closely-spaced high-temperature events were recorded in the Caribbean between the years of 1987 and 2009. Of these, only the 1998 global ENSO event, with well-documented levels of elevated SST, reduced cloud cover and surface water texture with concomittant increases in UV and irradiance and reduced water velocity, resulted in significant mortality at Little Cayman. Following this event, island-wide live coral cover decreased by 40%, from 26% to 14%. Annual monitoring of live coral cover following the 1998 ENSO event revealed no significant recovery of live coral cover until 2009, at which point there was a rapid rebound to pre-disturbance levels by 2011. Such a protracted step-change in coral recovery is indicative of one or more episodic events. The proposed scenario is that the numerous thermal stress events damaged the photo-system of the zooxanthellae, limiting the scope for growth and recovery as the metabolic budgets of corals were diverted to cellular repair. It is posited that the rapid cooling effect of frequent Tropical Storms and Hurricanes between 2002 - 2008, coupled with the

  9. Physics for the Technologies. Supplementary Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tim; And Others

    These supplemental units contain four laboratory exercises that can be used to enhance the labs in "Physics for the Technologies." The four units (one mechanical, two thermal, and one electrical) are designed to enhance labs in presenting specific concepts. Each unit can be used as an example of how the concepts behind the theory apply…

  10. Life cycle assessment of thermal waste-to-energy technologies: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Single well thermal tracer test, a new experimental set up for characterizing thermal transport in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Floriant; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Thermal transport in fractured media depends on the hydrological properties of fractures and thermal characteristics of rock. Tracer tests using heat as tracer can thus be a good alternative to characterize fractured media for shallow geothermal needs. This study investigates the possibility of implementing a new thermal tracer test set up, the single well thermal tracer test, to characterize hydraulic and thermal transport properties of fractured crystalline rock. The experimental setup is based on injecting hot water in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer in the borehole while pumping and monitoring the temperature in a fracture crossing the same borehole at greater elevation. One difficulty comes from the fact that injection and withdrawal are achieved in the same borehole involving thermal losses along the injection tube that may disturb the heat recovery signal. To be able to well localize the heat influx, we implemented a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS) which allows the temperature monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolution (29 centimeters and 30 seconds respectively). Several tests, at different pumping and injection rates, were performed in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). We show through signal processing how the thermal breakthrough may be extracted thanks to Fiber-Optic distributed temperature measurements. In particular, we demonstrate how detailed distributed temperature measurements were useful to identify different inflows and to estimate how much heat was transported and stored within the fractures network. Thermal breakthrough curves of single well thermal tracer tests were then interpreted with a simple analytical model to characterize hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the fractured media. We finally discuss the advantages of these tests compared to cross-borehole thermal tracer tests.

  12. Statistical Modeling Studies of Iron Recovery from Red Mud Using Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swagat, S. Rath; Archana, Pany; Jayasankar, K.; Ajit, K. Mitra; C. Satish, Kumar; Partha, S. Mukherjee; Barada, K. Mishra

    2013-05-01

    Optimization studies of plasma smelting of red mud were carried out. Reduction of the dried red mud fines was done in an extended arc plasma reactor to recover the pig iron. Lime grit and low ash metallurgical (LAM) coke were used as the flux and reductant, respectively. 2-level factorial design was used to study the influence of all parameters on the responses. Response surface modeling was done with the data obtained from statistically designed experiments. Metal recovery at optimum parameters was found to be 79.52%.

  13. Tensile deformation and recovery kinetics of Alloy 690. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.F.; Mayo, W.E.; Weissmann, S.

    1992-07-01

    The effect of carbon content, grain size and thermal history on the deformation behavior of nickel-base Alloy 690 has been investigated. Carbon content effects the yield strength of Mill Annealed (MA) material, but has no effect in Thermally Treated (TT) material. Also, no effect of carbon content on the workhardening rate was seen in either material. There was an effect of grain size as expected. An interesting aspect of this work showed that TT material consistently has a slightly higher Young`s modulus than the MA. As deformation moves into the plastic regime, the TT material displays a two stage hardeningmore » process. This consists of a low workhardening rate (n = 0.05), followed by a transition to the more normal workhardening rate (n=0.35). The MA material, on the other hand, does not exhibit the low n region. This unusual deformation behavior is attributable to the presence of planar slip which initiates at the grain boundary over the strain range of 0.2 to 0.7%. These observations are useful to explain the unexpectedly fast strain relaxation behavior seen in this alloy. The recovery kinetics of the alloy have also been studied. Rapid recovery with an activation energy of approximately 5.3 kj/mol occurs when the deformation level is low. This was attributed to a grain boundary self diffusion process. At higher strain levels, recovery is much slower with an activation energy of approximately 14 kJ/mol. This process was attributable to bulk diffusion. Based on TEM and X-ray rocking curve measurements, these results have been explained.« less

  14. Implementation Costs of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program in the United States: A Financial Model and Sensitivity Analysis Based on Experiences at a Quaternary Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Stone, Alexander B; Grant, Michael C; Pio Roda, Claro; Hobson, Deborah; Pawlik, Timothy; Wu, Christopher L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2016-03-01

    Despite positive results from several international Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocols, the United States has been slow to adopt ERAS protocols, in part due to concern regarding the expenses of such a program. We sought to evaluate the potential annual net cost savings of implementing a US-based ERAS program. Using data from existing publications and experience with an ERAS program, a model of net financial costs was developed for surgical groups of escalating numbers of annual cases. Our example scenario provided a financial analysis of the implementation of an ERAS program at a United States academic institution based on data from the ERAS Program for Colorectal Surgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Based on available data from the United States, ERAS programs lead to reductions in lengths of hospital stay that range from 0.7 to 2.7 days and substantial direct cost savings. Using example data from a quaternary hospital, the considerable cost of $552,783 associated with implementation of an ERAS program was offset by even greater savings in the first year of nearly $948,500, yielding a net savings of $395,717. Sensitivity analysis across several caseload and direct cost scenarios yielded similar savings in 20 of the 27 projections. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery protocols have repeatedly led to reduction in length of hospital stay and improved surgical outcomes. A financial model, based on published data and experience, projects that investment in an ERAS program can also lead to net financial savings for US hospitals. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Recovery of TOMS-EP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Sabelhaus, Phil; Mendenhall, Todd; Fesq, Lorraine

    1998-01-01

    On December 13th 1998, the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer - Earth Probe (TOMS-EP) spacecraft experienced a Single Event Upset which caused the system to reconfigure and enter a Safe Mode. This incident occurred two and a half years after the launch of the spacecraft which was designed for a two year life. A combination of factors, including changes in component behavior due to age and extended use, very unfortunate initial conditions and the safe mode processing logic prevented the spacecraft from entering its nominal long term storage mode. The spacecraft remained in a high fuel consumption mode designed for temporary use. By the time the onboard fuel was exhausted, the spacecraft was Sun pointing in a high rate flat spin. Although the uncontrolled spacecraft was initially in a power and thermal safe orientation, it would not stay in this state indefinitely due to a slow precession of its momentum vector. A recovery team was immediately assembled to determine if there was time to develop a method of despinning the vehicle and return it to normal science data collection. A three stage plan was developed that used the onboard magnetic torque rods as actuators. The first stage was designed to reduce the high spin rate to within the linear range of the gyros. The second stage transitioned the spacecraft from sun pointing to orbit reference pointing. The final stage returned the spacecraft to normal science operation. The entire recovery scenario was simulated with a wide range of initial conditions to establish the expected behavior. The recovery sequence was started on December 28th 1998 and completed by December 31st. TOMS-EP was successfully returned to science operations by the beginning of 1999. This paper describes the TOMS-EP Safe Mode design and the factors which led to the spacecraft anomaly and loss of fuel. The recovery and simulation efforts are described. Flight data are presented which show the performance of the spacecraft during its return to science

  16. Microwave Plasma Hydrogen Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Wheeler, Richard, Jr.; Dahl, Roger; Hadley, Neal

    2010-01-01

    A microwave plasma reactor was developed for the recovery of hydrogen contained within waste methane produced by Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), which reclaims oxygen from CO2. Since half of the H2 reductant used by the CRA is lost as CH4, the ability to reclaim this valuable resource will simplify supply logistics for longterm manned missions. Microwave plasmas provide an extreme thermal environment within a very small and precisely controlled region of space, resulting in very high energy densities at low overall power, and thus can drive high-temperature reactions using equipment that is smaller, lighter, and less power-consuming than traditional fixed-bed and fluidized-bed catalytic reactors. The high energy density provides an economical means to conduct endothermic reactions that become thermodynamically favorable only at very high temperatures. Microwave plasma methods were developed for the effective recovery of H2 using two primary reaction schemes: (1) methane pyrolysis to H2 and solid-phase carbon, and (2) methane oligomerization to H2 and acetylene. While the carbon problem is substantially reduced using plasma methods, it is not completely eliminated. For this reason, advanced methods were developed to promote CH4 oligomerization, which recovers a maximum of 75 percent of the H2 content of methane in a single reactor pass, and virtually eliminates the carbon problem. These methods were embodied in a prototype H2 recovery system capable of sustained high-efficiency operation. NASA can incorporate the innovation into flight hardware systems for deployment in support of future long-duration exploration objectives such as a Space Station retrofit, Lunar outpost, Mars transit, or Mars base. The primary application will be for the recovery of hydrogen lost in the Sabatier process for CO2 reduction to produce water in Exploration Life Support systems. Secondarily, this process may also be used in conjunction with a Sabatier reactor employed to

  17. Art Therapy on a Hospital Burn Unit: A Step towards Healing and Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, Johanna

    1995-01-01

    Describes how art therapy can benefit patients hospitalized due to severe burns, who suffer psychological as well as physical trauma. Outlines the psychological phases, identifies how burn patients typically experience their healing process, and discusses how art therapy can assist the patient at each stage of the recovery process. (JPS)

  18. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  19. DOE tallies Class III oil recovery field projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    Here are details from midterm proposals submitted as part of the US Department of Energy's Class 3 oil recovery field demonstration candidate projects. All of the proposals emphasize dissemination of project details so that the results, if successful, can be applied widely in similar reservoirs. Project results will also be fed into a national petroleum technology transfer network. The proposals include: Gulf of Mexico, Gulf coast, offshore California, a California thermal, immiscible CO[sub 2], produced/potable water, microbial EOR, California diatomite, West Texas Spraberry field, and other Permian Basin fields.

  20. A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Krishnan, V. B.; Singh, J. D.; Woodruff, T. R.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) can produce large strains when deformed (e.g., up to 8%). Heating results in a phase transformation and associated recovery of all the accumulated strain. This strain recovery can occur against large forces, resulting in their use as actuators. Thus an SMA element can integrate both sensory and actuation functions, by inherently sensing a change in temperature and actuating by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. Two aspects of our work on cryogenic SMAs are addressed here. First - a shape memory alloy based cryogenic thermal conduction switch for operation between dewars of liquid methane and liquid oxygen in a common bulkhead arrangement is discussed. Such a switch integrates the sensor element and the actuator element and can be used to create a variable thermal sink to other cryogenic tanks for liquefaction, densification, and zero boil-off systems for advanced spaceport applications. Second - fabrication via arc-melting and subsequent materials testing of SMAs with cryogenic transformation temperatures for use in the aforementioned switch is discussed.

  1. 78 FR 14358 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York in the lawsuit entitled United...; and Mountain Mart 108, LLC. The proposed Consent Decree resolves claims of the United States under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by various laws including the Resource Conservation and Recovery...

  2. Waste heat recovery with ultra high-speed turbomachinery

    SciTech Connect

    Vakkilainen, E.; Larjola, J.; Lindgren, O.

    1984-08-01

    A new ORC heat recovery system which converts waste heat to electricity has been developed in Lappeenranta University of Technology with support from Department of Energy in Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry. Use of ultra high-speed turbomachinery (10 000 rpm - 200 000 rpm) promises lower unit costs, higher efficiencies and fast amortization rate, 2,4 - 3,0 years.

  3. Solar-thermal jet pumping for irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, L. D.; Dellenback, P. A.; Bell, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a novel concept in solar powered irrigation pumping, gives measured performance data for the pump unit, and projected system performance. The solar-thermal jet pumping concept is centered around a conventional jet eductor pump which is commercially available at low cost. The jet eductor pump is powered by moderate temperature, moderate pressure Refrigerant-113 vapor supplied by a concentrating solar collector field. The R-113 vapor is direct condensed by the produced water and the two fluids are separated at the surface. The water goes on to use and the R-113 is repressurized and returned to the solar field. The key issue in the solar-thermal jet eductor concept is the efficiency of pump operation. Performance data from a small scale experimental unit which utilizes an electrically heated boiler in place of the solar field is presented. The solar-thermal jet eductor concept is compared with other solar irrigation concepts and optimal application situations are identified. Though having lower efficiencies than existing Rankine cycle solar-thermal irrigation systems, the mechanical and operational simplicity of this concept make it competitive with other solar powered irrigation schemes.

  4. Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep Prior to a Noxious Inflammatory Insult Influence Characteristics and Duration of Pain.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient sleep and chronic pain are public health epidemics. Sleep loss worsens pain and predicts the development of chronic pain. Whether previous, acute sleep loss and recovery sleep determine pain levels and duration remains poorly understood. This study tested whether acute sleep deprivation and recovery sleep prior to formalin injection alter post-injection pain levels and duration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48) underwent sleep deprivation or ad libitum sleep for 9 hours. Thereafter, rats received a subcutaneous injection of formalin or saline into a hind paw. In the recovery sleep group, rats were allowed 24 h between sleep deprivation and the injection of formalin. Mechanical and thermal nociception were assessed using the von Frey test and Hargreaves' method. Nociceptive measures were performed at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days post-injection. Formalin caused bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that persisted for up to 21 days post-injection. Sleep deprivation significantly enhanced bilateral allodynia. There was a synergistic interaction when sleep deprivation preceded a formalin injection. Rats allowed a recovery sleep period prior to formalin injection developed allodynia only in the injected limb, with higher mechanical thresholds (less allodynia) and a shorter recovery period. There were no persistent changes in thermal nociception. The data suggest that acute sleep loss preceding an inflammatory insult enhances pain and can contribute to chronic pain. The results encourage studies in a model of surgical pain to test whether enhancing sleep reduces pain levels and duration. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. 15 CFR 971.209 - Processing outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing outside the United States... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Applications Contents § 971.209 Processing outside the United States. (a) Except as provided in this section...

  6. 15 CFR 971.427 - Processing outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing outside the United States... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Issuance... outside the United States. If appropriate TCRs will incorporate provisions to implement the decision of...

  7. Effects of nutrient and water restriction on thermal tolerance: A test of mechanisms and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katherine A; Boardman, Leigh; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Terblanche, John S

    2017-10-01

    Nutritional deprivation or desiccation can influence thermal tolerance by impacting the insects' ability to evaporatively cool, maintain cell membrane integrity and conduct protective or repair processes. Recovery from chilling is also linked to the re-establishment of iono- and osmo-regulatory homeostasis. Here, using Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata, Diptera: Tephritidae), we manipulated water and nutrient availability to test the mechanistic expectation that changes in whole organism lipid and water content can elicit variation in cold or heat tolerance (scored as chill coma recovery time and heat knockdown time). We measured body condition (body water and lipid content) as well as heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70) and protein (HSP70) levels. A significant reduction in body water content with water restriction did not translate into differences in chill coma recovery. When nutrient restriction was coupled with water deprivation, this resulted in a significant reduction (-54%) of heat knockdown time in females but male flies were unaffected. There was no evidence for an hsp70 or HSP70 response under any of the stress treatments and therefore no correlation with heat or cold tolerance. Heat hardening decreased all hsp levels. Therefore, although body water and total body lipid content differed between the treatment groups, the contribution of these factors to thermal tolerance was inconsistent with mechanistic expectations in heat knockdown time and insignificant for chill coma recovery. These results therefore highlight that the effects of resource restriction on thermal limits in insects are mechanistically more complex than previous models of stress resistance have suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within themore » range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  9. Potential uranium supply from phosphoric acid: A U.S. analysis comparing solvent extraction and Ion exchange recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haeyeon; G. Eggert, Roderick; W. Carlsen, Brett

    Phosphate rock contains significant amounts of uranium, although in low concentrations. Recovery of uranium as a by-product from phosphoric acid, an intermediate product produced during the recovery of phosphorus from phosphate rock, is not unprecedented. Phosphoric acid plants ceased to produce uranium as a by-product in the early 1990s with the fall of uranium prices. In the last decade, this topic has regained attention due to higher uranium prices and expected increase in demand for uranium. Our study revisits the topic and estimates how much uranium might be recoverable from current phosphoric acid production in the United States and whatmore » the associated costs might be considering two different recovery processes: solvent extraction and ion exchange. Based on U.S. phosphoric acid production in 2014, 5.5 million pounds of U 3O 8 could have been recovered, more than domestic U.S. mine production of uranium in the same year. Annualized costs for a hypothetical uranium recovery plant are US$48-66 per pound U 3O 8 for solvent extraction, the process used historically in the United States to recover uranium from phosphoric acid. For ion exchange, not yet proven at a commercial scale for uranium recovery, the estimated costs are US$33-54 per pound U 3O 8. Our results suggest that it is technically possible for the United States to recover significant quantities of uranium from current phosphoric acid production. And for this type of uranium production to be economically attractive on a large scale, either recovery costs must fall or uranium prices rise.« less

  10. Potential uranium supply from phosphoric acid: A U.S. analysis comparing solvent extraction and Ion exchange recovery

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Haeyeon; G. Eggert, Roderick; W. Carlsen, Brett; ...

    2016-06-16

    Phosphate rock contains significant amounts of uranium, although in low concentrations. Recovery of uranium as a by-product from phosphoric acid, an intermediate product produced during the recovery of phosphorus from phosphate rock, is not unprecedented. Phosphoric acid plants ceased to produce uranium as a by-product in the early 1990s with the fall of uranium prices. In the last decade, this topic has regained attention due to higher uranium prices and expected increase in demand for uranium. Our study revisits the topic and estimates how much uranium might be recoverable from current phosphoric acid production in the United States and whatmore » the associated costs might be considering two different recovery processes: solvent extraction and ion exchange. Based on U.S. phosphoric acid production in 2014, 5.5 million pounds of U 3O 8 could have been recovered, more than domestic U.S. mine production of uranium in the same year. Annualized costs for a hypothetical uranium recovery plant are US$48-66 per pound U 3O 8 for solvent extraction, the process used historically in the United States to recover uranium from phosphoric acid. For ion exchange, not yet proven at a commercial scale for uranium recovery, the estimated costs are US$33-54 per pound U 3O 8. Our results suggest that it is technically possible for the United States to recover significant quantities of uranium from current phosphoric acid production. And for this type of uranium production to be economically attractive on a large scale, either recovery costs must fall or uranium prices rise.« less

  11. Dynamical maps, quantum detailed balance, and the Petz recovery map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhambra, Álvaro M.; Woods, Mischa P.

    2017-08-01

    Markovian master equations (formally known as quantum dynamical semigroups) can be used to describe the evolution of a quantum state ρ when in contact with a memoryless thermal bath. This approach has had much success in describing the dynamics of real-life open quantum systems in the laboratory. Such dynamics increase the entropy of the state ρ and the bath until both systems reach thermal equilibrium, at which point entropy production stops. Our main result is to show that the entropy production at time t is bounded by the relative entropy between the original state and the state at time 2 t . The bound puts strong constraints on how quickly a state can thermalize, and we prove that the factor of 2 is tight. The proof makes use of a key physically relevant property of these dynamical semigroups, detailed balance, showing that this property is intimately connected with the field of recovery maps from quantum information theory. We envisage that the connections made here between the two fields will have further applications. We also use this connection to show that a similar relation can be derived when the fixed point is not thermal.

  12. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzillo, Anita T.; Mertig, Angela G.; Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict.

  13. Radiation Induced Degradation of White Thermal Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Zwiener, J. M.; Wertz, G. E.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, M. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper details a comparison analysis of the zinc-oxide pigmented white thermal control paints Z-93 and Z-93P. Both paints were simultaneously exposed to combined space environmental effects and analyzed using an in-vacuo reflectance technique. The dose applied to the paints was approximately equivalent to 5 yr in a geosynchronous orbit. This comparison analysis showed that Z-93P is an acceptable substitute for Z-93. Irradiated samples of Z-93 and Z-93P were subjected to additional exposures of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and analyzed using the in-vacuo reflectance technique to investigate UV activated reflectance recovery. Both samples showed minimal UV activated reflectance recovery after an additional 190 equivalent Sun hour (ESH) exposure. Reflectance response utilizing nitrogen as a repressurizing gas instead of air was also investigated. This investigation found the rates of reflectance recovery when repressurized with nitrogen are slower than when repressurized with air.

  14. 78 FR 38011 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Recovery Plan for Oregon Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... and Threatened Species; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Recovery Plan for Oregon Coast Coho Salmon... Oregon Coast coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) (OC coho) and... which can be accessed at http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/protected_species/salmon_steelhead/recovery_planning...

  15. Thermal integration of Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. C.; Hopson, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    The method of thermally integrating the experiments for Spacelab is discussed. The scientific payload consists of a combination of European and United States sponsored experiments located in the module as well as on a single Spacelab pallet. The thermal integration must result in accomodating the individual experiment requirements as well as ensuring that the total payload is within the Spacelab Environmental Control System (ECS) resource capability. An integrated thermal/ECS analysis of the module and pallet is performed in concert with the mission timeline to ensure that the agreed upon experiment requirements are accommodated and to ensure the total payload is within the Spacelab ECS resources.

  16. Recovery from cannabis use disorders: Abstinence versus moderation and treatment-assisted recovery versus natural recovery.

    PubMed

    Stea, Jonathan N; Yakovenko, Igor; Hodgins, David C

    2015-09-01

    The present study of recovery from cannabis use disorders was undertaken with 2 primary objectives that address gaps in the literature. The first objective was to provide an exploratory portrait of the recovery process from cannabis use disorders, comparing individuals who recovered naturally with those who were involved in treatment. The second objective was to explore systematically the similarities and differences between abstinence and moderation recoveries. Adults who have recovered from a cannabis use disorder were recruited in the community (N = 119). The abstinence and treatment-assisted participants exhibited higher levels of lifetime cannabis problem severity than the moderation and natural recovery participants, respectively. As well, cognitive factors were identified as the most useful strategies for recovery (e.g., thinking about benefits and negative consequences of cannabis), followed by behavioral factors (e.g., avoidance of triggers for use and high-risk situations). Findings lend further support to the effectiveness of cognitive, motivational, and behavioral strategies as helpful actions and maintenance factors involved in the recovery process. The findings also generally support the idea that cannabis use disorders lie on a continuum of problem severity, with moderation and natural recoveries more likely to occur at the lower end of the continuum and abstinence and treatment-assisted recoveries more likely to occur at the upper end. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. A database and probabilistic assessment methodology for carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery and associated carbon dioxide retention in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Attanasi, Emil; Olea, Ricardo A.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, Philip; Brennan, Sean T.; Merrill, Matthew; Jahediesfanjani, Hossein; Roueche, Jacqueline; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed an assessment methodology for estimating the potential incremental technically recoverable oil resources resulting from carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) in reservoirs with appropriate depth, pressure, and oil composition. The methodology also includes a procedure for estimating the CO2 that remains in the reservoir after the CO2-EOR process is complete. The methodology relies on a reservoir-level database that incorporates commercially available geologic and engineering data. The mathematical calculations of this assessment methodology were tested and produced realistic results for the Permian Basin Horseshoe Atoll, Upper Pennsylvanian-Wolfcampian Play (Texas, USA). The USGS plans to use the new methodology to conduct an assessment of technically recoverable hydrocarbons and associated CO2 sequestration resulting from CO2-EOR in the United States.

  18. Effect of Aging Treatment on the Compressibility and Recovery of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys as Static Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Li, Gang; Liu, Luwei; Zhu, Xiaolei; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-07-01

    The improvement of the compressibility and recovery of the gaskets can decrease the leakage occurrence in bolted flange connections. In this study, the effect of aging treatment on the compressibility and recovery of NiTi shape memory alloys is investigated as static seals together with thermal analysis. The experimental results indicate that different phase transformations of NiTi alloys are exhibited in the DSC curves during aging treatment. The recovery coefficient of NiTi alloys aged at 500 °C for 2 h is quite low accompanied with a large residual strain. With increasing aging time at the aging temperature of 400 °C, the residual strain and area of hysteresis loop of NiTi alloys are both increased, whereas the recovery coefficient is decreased. Since the deformation associates the phase transformation behavior, aging treatment could improve the compressibility and recovery of NiTi alloys as static seals.

  19. Thermal coefficients of technology assimilation by natural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Estimates of thermal coefficients of the rates of technology assimilation processes was made. Consideration of such processes as vegetation and soil recovery and pollution assimilation indicates that these processes proceed ten to several hundred times more slowly in earth's cold regions than in temperate regions. It was suggested that these differential assimilation rates are important data in planning for technological expansion in Arctic regions.

  20. Self-paced cycling performance and recovery under a hot and highly humid environment after cooling.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, B R; Hagin, V; Guillot, R; Placet, V; Monnier-Benoit, P; Groslambert, A

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of pre- and post-cooling on self-paced time-trial cycling performance and recovery of cyclists exercising under a hot and highly humid environment (29.92 °C-78.52% RH). Ten male cyclists performed a self-paced 20-min time trial test (TT20) on a cyclo-ergometer while being cooled by a cooling vest and a refrigerating headband during the warm-up and the recovery period. Heart rate, power output, perceived exertion, thermal comfort, skin and rectal temperatures were recorded. Compared to control condition (222.78 ± 47 W), a significant increase (P<0.05) in the mean power output during the TT20 (239.07 ± 45 W; +7.31%) was recorded with a significant (P<0.05) decrease in skin temperature without affecting perceived exertion, heart rate, or rectal temperature at the end of the TT20. However, pace changes occurred independently of skin or rectal temperatures variations but a significant difference (P<0.05) in the body's heat storage was observed between both conditions. This result suggests that a central programmer using body's heat storage as an input may influence self-paced time-trial performance. During the recovery period, post-cooling significantly decreased heart rate, skin and rectal temperatures, and improved significantly (P<0.05) thermal comfort. Therefore, in hot and humid environments, wearing a cooling vest and a refrigerating headband during warm-up improves self-paced performance, and appears to be an effective mean of reaching skin rest temperatures more rapidly during recovery.